Monthly Archives: April 2018

Fort Crook Masonic Lodge #250 presents plaque to Burney High Teachers

As part of the Masons long-time effort to support public education, Grand Master Jim Crockett and Mason George Whitfield from Fort Crook Masonic Lodge #250 presented a plaque to Principal Ray Guerrero at a student assembly at Burney Junior-Senior High School.

Masons Jim Crockett and George Whitfield with BHS teachers and Principal Ray Guerrero

Jim Crockett said, “Fort Crook Masonic Lodge #250 in Fall River Mills has for years supported the schools in the Intermountain Area. This year we are presenting plaques to the Staff and teachers of Fall River, Burney and Big Valley schools in recognition of their efforts and achievements furthering the education of the students.”

Clique on image to enlarge

The plaque says, “We hereby proclaim our sincere thanks to the teachers and staff of Burney Junior Senior High School and extend our congratulations for their provision of outstanding academic instruction, leading in turn to exemplary achievement by all enrolled students.”

Bruce R. Galloway, Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons of the State of California proclaimed April Public Education Month for 2018. On April 1, the California Department of Education also issued a statement encouraging people to recognize April as Public Education Month.

Before presenting the plaque to Principal Guerrero, Crockett gave a brief history of Masonic support for public education.

Crockett and Whitfield address the student body

In his talk he said,

Because Freemasonry places such great importance on education, we have become steadfast supporters of the Public Schools. Horace Mann, the father of our present system of public schools, wrote that the object of a free public schools system is “to give every child a free, straight, solid pathway by which he can walk directly up from the ignorance of an infant to a knowledge of the primary duties of a man.”

The California State public school system was started in the 1850’s, and the first State Superintendent of Public Instruction was John Swett, a transplanted Mason who had come west in the years following the Gold Rush.

The public schools have always been a special concern of California Masons. Charles Albert Adams, Grand Master in 1920, wrote that as Masons “we subscribe to the belief that an enlightened citizenship is the first great care of a progressive State:’ He believed that the future of our free democracy depended on the quality of our public schools.

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Intermountain Preparedness Group holds interagency exercise to prepare for mass causality events

On Thursday April 26 from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m., about two dozen representatives from emergency response units, healthcare facilities, and support services met at the Burney Fire Hall to conduct a “Mass Casualty Table Top Exercise.”

Burney Fire District Chief Monte Keady facilitating the discussion

The meeting was a function of the Intermountain Preparedness Group that was formed to “attain shared preparedness and bring stability during crisis.” Agencies attending the meeting included CAL FIRE, Shasta County Fire Service, McArthur Fire Protection District, Burney Fire Protection District, Mayers Memorial Hospital District, Mountain Valley Health Centers, Pit River Health Service, Sierra Emergency Medical Services Alliance, Southern Cascades EMS District, Shasta County OEM, Shasta County Health and Human Services, and the American Red Cross,  .

The exercise was facilitated by Burney Fire Protection District Chief Monte Keady. Participants were organized into three groups according to their mission and function. The three groups were: 1) Fire, Hazmat, and Emergency Services; 2) Health Care Facilities; and 3) Support Services.

Chief Keady began the exercise by presenting a scenario of a mass causality event. The scenario involved a 40 vehicle fire on Hwy 299 in which 40 vehicles were involved. It included injuries and fatalities, a fire that began to spread, and a hazardous waste spill.

After briefing the audience on the situation, Keady asked each group to engage in a fifteen minute discussion about how they would respond to this emergency in the first 60-90 minutes.

Group discussions in progress

Afterward, a representative from each group presented a summary of their discussion. In their summaries they discussed how they would plan, organize and staff each of their operations, set up a command structure and communications, organize relief efforts and transportation, provide services, set up shelters, etc. After each presentation there was an opportunity for question and answer and open discussion.

Mayers Hosptial CEO Louis Ward reporting for the Health Services discussion group

The rest of the agenda had two more scenario updates followed by group, intergroup, and open discussions. The last scenario update involved the close of the incident. The final event of the exercise was “Lessons learned,” a thirty minute period of shared reflection during which participants could share “Aha moments.”

The meeting also included breaks during which participants could share refreshments and talk on a less formal basis.

For more information about the Intermountain Preparedness Group, citizens can contact any of the participating agencies.

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Filed under Burney, Fire Departments, health, Law enforcement, Mayers Memorial Hospital, Mountain Valleys Health Cliinic, Pit River Tribe, Public Safety

INTERMOUNTAIN COMMUNITY YARD SALE SATURDAY, JUNE 9, 2018

Planning a yard sale soon??? Why not plan to join in with the entire Intermountain Community and advertise your yard sale not only in Burney, but in Fall River Mills, Redding, McCloud, Mt Shasta and Alturas too! Local businesses are welcome to advertise. After all, those garage sale junkies need to stop for food and refreshments! Own a second-hand store or gift shop? Add it into the mix! Submit your yard sale or business for just $7 and we’ll advertise locally in the Intermountain News, Mt Echo, and Record Searchlight as well as the local paper in the above surrounding communities. We’ll also print a map pinpointing your specific location!!

EARLY BIRD SPECIAL: Complete an entry form and return it to the Burney Chamber of Commerce before May 30th and be included in a SPECIAL LISTING provided by the Intermountain News!

FINAL DEADLINE: To be included on the FINAL MAP, entry forms must be received by 4:30 pm on Wednesday, June 6, 2018 for the map distribution on Friday afternoon.

Forms are available at: Novel T’s, High Country Real Estate, Tri Counties Bank (Fall River Mills & Burney), US Bank, Old Mill Grill, Klein Equipment, and Burney Chamber of Commerce

Questions? Call 530-335-2111 or 530-335-5535

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Community Foundation Announces Open Application Period

Shasta Regional Community Foundation is a resource building organization in Shasta and Siskiyou counties dedicated to promoting philanthropy by connecting people who care with causes that matter. Since inception in 2000, the Community Foundation has awarded over $21,000,000 in grants to area nonprofit organizations.

Applications are currently available to request project support from two field of interest funds managed by the Community Foundation. These opportunities are provided thanks to the efforts and investments made by many generous donors in our region. The Animal Welfare Endowment Fund was established in 2009 to benefit projects that will provide care for animals in Shasta and Siskiyou counties; the Community Arts Endowment Fund was established to support grants to nonprofits, public entities, and individual artists for the creation and presentation of new work in any media in the region. Grant review committee members from the areas served evaluate the proposals and make recommendations for funding.

The online application deadlines for these current grant requests are June 20, 2018 and June 27, 2018, respectively. Visit the grants page on the Community Foundation’s website at www.shastarcf.org/grants for additional application specifics and materials. For further information, contact Program Officer, Amanda Hutchings at amanda@shastarcf.org or call 530.244.1219.

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Texas School Girl does National History Day project on “Radium Girl” cases

In late March, I received a phone call from a high school student in Texas named Nirvana Khan. She told that she was preparing a website for National History Day 2018.

More that half a million middle and high school students and over 30,000 teachers nationwide participate in National History Day each year. This year’s theme is Conflict and Compromise.

Ms. Khan told me that for her project she had chosen the legal battles that took place from the  1920’s to the 1940’s involving young women who had suffered disastrous illnesses from radium poisoning resulting from their employment painting watch dials.

Because my grandfather, Ray Berry, had represented Grace Fryer and some other New Jersey girls in their case against US Radium Corporation beginning in 1927, she asked if we could do an interview for her project. I agreed and we had a very nice talk.

Her website Legion Of The Doomed: How The Radium Girls’ Compromise Changed Public Safety is now completed and online. Ms. Khan succinctly and fluently provides the background of the radium craze in the early part of the 20th century, covers the conflict with the corporations, describes the compromise and settlement of the case, and discusses the aftermath and effect that the cases had on subsequent labor and worker safety law. Each section is full of fascinating newspaper articles and quotes.

In her process paper for the project, Ms. Khan describes her work,

I started by reading modern news articles about their case and gradually went further to gain a sense of the historical context; this included finding pictures, quotes, and news articles from the time about World War I and the radium craze. While doing so I also stumbled on several scholarly sources such as law reviews and scientific studies on the radium girls, which helped me understand their historical significance. I was able to purchase several books, including Kate Moore’s “The Radium Girls,” which helped me gain a thorough knowledge of the women and feel like I knew them personally. From there I found many newspaper articles and photographs from their case, as well as a documentary “Radium City” where one can see interviews of the living radium girls and the families of the dead. Finally, I circled back again to modern news articles in order to properly define their legacy.

Ms. Khan also said

The lawsuit filed against the corporations is very interesting because of the  lack of regard the corporations had for their female employees, the fact that the dial painters triumphed against such stacked odds, and the revolutionary nature of the case. The compromise reached at the end of the case by both parties following the girls’ victory cleared the way for workers’ rights and compensation cases, as well as changed America’s view of radium and knowledge of radium necrosis. This led to safety measures for the public that survived through World War II and beyond.

Her website also has a 16 page bibliography that is a wonderful resource for further investigation.

Currently, she is participating in the state level History Day competition in Texas. Competition in Texas is fierce so she is not sure if she will make it to the national competition. The National History Day Competition will be held June 10-14 at the University of Maryland in College Park Maryland.

Best wishes, Nirvana Khan! I hope you win it all. You have performed a great service

See also

Case argued by Raymond H. Berry featured in new book by British author

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Burney Junior-Senior High Students Light up the Stage with “Princess Whatsername”

“The 2018 Spring musical was a smash hit! Burney Junior and Senior High School Students presented three marvelous performances of “Princess Whatsername” written by Brian B. Taylor with music by Bill Francoeur and lyrics by Scott de Turk at the Liz Polley Center for the Arts.

Opening number

The production was directed by Jill Reed Lights and Sound by Larry Goza and Alissa Tereba and Stage Direction by Carolyn Garrigua and her crew. About 400 people came to see the performances that took place on Wednesday, Thursday and Saturday nights.

Princess Whatsername

A talented cast of dozens  of students took the audience through a cleverly constructed fairy tale peopled with characters from a range of Grimm’s folk tales including Hansel and Gretel, Rumpelstiltskin, Goldilocks and the Three Bears, Snow White and the Seven Dwarves, Cinderella and the Fairy Godmother, Rapunzel, Hercules, princesses and princes, and good and bad fairies.

Hansel and Gretel find Princess Whatsername in the woods

The lead character, Princess Whatsername (played by Bailey Turner) turned out to be Princess Aurora, who had been pricked by a spinning wheel and lost her memory. In her quest to regain her true identity, she wandered through an enchanted forest as the characters enacted comic scenes and delightful musical numbers.

Hansel after eating a candy house

All the students performed excellently. The Seven Dwarves number was classic. Elie Urlie dazzled the audience with his performance as an intriguing hip-hop style Rumpelstiltskin. Paris Deaton-Geisler shone as a country-western style Snow White.

Princess Whatsername and Rumplestiltskin

After the performance a special plaque was presented from the Mountain Echo newspaper with a photo and news article of the first chorale performance at Liz Polley Center.

Jill Reed displays a special historical plaque

Ms. Reed then presented the students actors with gifts of appreciation for their hard work and excellent performance, and the students in turn presented gifts to Director Reed and Carolyn Garrigua expressing their love and gratitude.

Here are more pictures of the performance:

Prince Reveille and Rumplestiltskin

Snow White and Goldilocks in the house of the Three Bears

The Seven Dwarves

The Three Bears chase Princesses

The Queen of the West and Snow White

Goldilocks, Princess Whatsername and Rapunzel

Singing Princesses

Three Bears, Snow White, and Prince Reveille

Prince Hercules challenges Prince Reveille

Queen of the North

Three Bears, Snow White, and Prince Reveille

Princess Aurora reunited with her parents and her true love

Rumpleskiltskin performs the wedding

The final number

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Chelsea Davis and Joel Biles chosen as BHS April Students of the Month

Chelsea Davis and Joel Biles were honored as April Students of the Month at the Burney Lions Club on Thursday evening April 19. Davis was named 12th grade student of the month and Biles was named 8th grade student of the month.

Lion George Whitfield, Chelsea Davis, Joel Biles, and Principal Ray Guerrero,

The students were introduced by Burney High School Principal Ray Guerrero. Lion George Whitfield presented each of the students with a check. Chelsea Davis was awarded $100, and Joel Biles received $50.

Senior Chelsea Davis has an outstanding grade point average of 4.43. She is a member of the S-Club,  CSF, FNL, Leos Club, Leadership Club, and Mentoring. She also plays on the basketball and softball teams.

She enjoys reading, listening to music, watching movies and spending time with loved ones. She would like very much to go on a cruise and to travel to other countries to learn about other cultures.

After graduating from high school, Chelsea will attend Sacramento State University.

Chelsea’s mother and father, Nikki and Rich Davis attended to watch their daughter receive the award. Mr. Davis said “Chelsea worked very hard to become student of the month. Thank you very much to the Lions for the wonderful dinner and program and all that they do for the community.”

Eighth-grader Joel Biles also has a 3.13 grade point average. He is involved in activities at the Word of Life Church. He enjoys playing baseball, drawing, video games and watching television. Something that he hasn’t done but would like to do is “jump off a cliff into a lake.”

In the future Joel hopes to go to college and become and engineer.

Joel’s brother Ben and grandfather David Biles attended the ceremony. His grandfather praised Joel saying, “Congratulations on a good job! I hope that you come back many times.”

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