Monthly Archives: June 2018

Pit River Health Service holds appreciation barbecue

Pit River Health Service, Inc. (PRHS) held an appreciation barbecue at the Veterans Hall in Burney on Friday, June 29 to recognize and thank all who were involved in helping achieve accreditation from the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care (AAAHC). About 50 people, including board members, administrators, staff and health care providers attended.

Glenna Moore gives a slide show reviewing the process and congratulating all involved

The program began with a slide presentation by Glenna Moore, Executive Director of PRHS. Ms. Moore explained the detailed process they had gone through to meet all of the high standards required for accreditation.

The journey involved extensive self-assessment and on-site survey by AAAHC expert surveyors – physicians, nurses, and administrators who are actively involved in ambulatory health care. The survey is consultative and educational, designed to help clinics achieve the highest standard of care for their patients. Ms. Moore thanked and congratulated everyone present for their hard work.

Executive Director Glenna Moore recounting the journey to excellence

Following the slide show, Laurie Hayward, Health Board Chairperson, spoke of the compassion and commitment that contributed to success.

“I am so proud of you,” she said. “We worked together as a team, a clinic, and a community. We would not be here if you did not have compassion for your job.”

Certificates of appreciation had been prepared for all who participated. Executive Director Moore presented Betty George, Treasurer of the Board, with a beautiful blanket in appreciation of her work. Other members of the Board are: Denise Winn Wright, Vice Chairperson; Louise Davis, Board Secretary; and Lester ‘Wayne’ Gibbs.

Betty George thanked for her service

Chairperson Hayward then presented Glenna Moore with a certificate and a purse.

Laurie Hayward, Denise Petersen, and Glenna Moore

After the presentation of certificates, there was a cake cutting ceremony.

Celebrating excellence and achievement

Board members posed for a commemorative picture,

Board members standing by motto and cake

and Chairperson Hayward cut the cake.

Board members standing by motto and cake

Tribal elder Jessica Jim and Administrative Assistant Denise Petersen also shared in the celebration of compassion, commitment, and community.

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Filed under Burney, health, Pit River Tribe

BWD approves Solar Electric Installation Contract

On June 28, the Burney Water District approved a contract with Top Hat Energy, Inc. for the installation of a solar system at the Raymond H. Berry Pool to generate electricity. The Board also authorized BWD District Manager Willie Rodriguez to accept a 50,000 grant from the McConnell Foundation to help pay for the project.

Board President Fred Ryness, and Board Members Jim Hamlin and Britta Rogers were present at the meeting and voted unanimously to approve both agenda items.

The system will be installed by the pool where the horseshoe pits presently are. To install the system will cost $87,450. The grant from McConnell Foundation will cover $50,000. The remaining $37,450 will be paid from reserve funds. Reserve funds will be paid back as savings accrue.

The annual PG&E bill for pool operation, including both gas and electric, is currently about $10,000. Most of that cost is for electricity to run the pool pumps.  To insure that the water is clean and safe, the pumps at the pool run 24 hours a day 7 days a week from pool opening in May until closing ins September.

Electricity generated by the solar panels is returned to the grid and will be credited to BWD’s account. It is expected that the electricity generated will offset most of the electric cost resulting in thousands of dollars of savings per year. Thus, funds from the reserve should be reimbursed within four years.

The McConnell grant came with several conditions. One of the conditions is that the savings provide benefit to the community. One of the benefits is that the pool will be able to maintain and increase activities without increasing rates.

Labor costs are expected to rise in 2020 when the minimum wage is raised to $15 per hour. Increased labor costs could result in cutting hours of employees or limiting hours of operation of the pool. Savings on electricity will help to offset these rising labor expenses.

Pool manager Stephanie McQuade said that she hopes that rather than decreasing activities, the pool will now be able to add new programs.

The grant also stipulated that the project include some volunteerism. Before installation can occur, the horseshoe pits need to be removed and several trees need to be cleared. Several people have expressed interest in the pits. McQuade is looking for a tree faller who will volunteer services to take down the trees.

In addition, she is planning to have volunteers split, chop, and sell the wood as a fundraiser for the Swim Club.

Now, that the contract is approved, installation of the grid will begin as soon as the area is cleared. Top Hat Energy will be responsible for obtaining permits, installation, and providing interface with the PG&E grid.

Rodriguez said the new system could be operational as soon as August this summer. The life of the panels are 20 to 25 years and will be under warranty. Cameras will be installed to deter vandalism to the solar panels.

 

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Mountain Valleys Health Centers Breaks Ground On New Facility In McArthur

Dozens of healthcare providers, staff, board members, and community leaders came out on June 28 to celebrate the ground breaking ceremony for Mountain Valleys Health Centers (MVHC) new Fall River Valley Health Center at 43658 HWY 299 E, McArthur, CA.

MVHC improving health care in the Intermountain area

MHVC CEO Dave Jones and Shasta County Supervisor Mary Rickert each spoke briefly.

MVHC CEO Dave Jones addressing the gathering

Dave Jones said, “We look forward to serving the residents of the Fall River Valley by providing quality patient care and are very excited about the new clinic. The much needed larger building will allow for us to better meet the needs of our patients. We are committed to making the transition into the new facility as streamlined as possible.”

Supervisor Rickert said, “Rural areas face challenges for successful health care and this facility will be a very welcome addition for this community. As a resident of Fall River Valley for 30 years, this project is particularly exciting for me.”

Then Jones, Rickert, and MVHC Board Chairman Dan Bouse each took a shovel and broke ground.

Breaking Ground

Chairman Bouse said, “We want to provide the best health care environment that we can for the area. Fall River Valley deserves this.”

The new facility will boast 10 exam rooms with enough room for telehealth and behavioral health services in addition to providing basic primary care.  Construction on the project is expected to be completed around February 2019.

MVHC expressed thanks the McConnell Foundation for their generous donation to the project.

Krystina Uribes, Project Manager for Aspen Street Architects who provided the design, was present to represent the company. The architect of record is Nate Morgan. Architect Ezra Ivey also worked on the design.,

Kristina Uribes from Aspen Street Architects and Kerry Foster of Trent Construction

Construction is being done by Trent Construction. Kerry Foster was present at the ceremony and took every one on a tour of the site.

Examining the future conference room

Mountain Valleys Health Centers, Inc., (MVHC) is a not-for-profit community health center organization offering quality health, behavioral, and dental care to rural communities in northeastern California for over 30 years. Mountain Valleys Health Centers operates facilities in Bieber, Burney, Dorris, Fall River, Mt. Shasta, Tulelake, and Weed.

To find out more about Mountain Valleys Health Centers please visit them on their website www.mountainvalleyhc.org or visit them on their Facebook page at www.Facebook.com/MVHCenters.

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Filed under Fall River, Fall River Mills, health, McArthur, Mountain Valleys Health Cliinic

Pit River Health Service Achieves Accreditation

Press release from Pit River Health Services, Inc. June 6:

Burney, CA—Pit River Health Service, Inc. (PRHS) announced today that it has achieved full accreditation from the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care (AAAHC).  Accreditation distinguishes this community health clinic from many other outpatient facilities by providing the highest quality of care to its patients as determined by an independent, external process of evaluation.

Status as an accredited organization means that PRHS has met nationally recognized standards for the provision of quality health care set by AAAHC. More than 6,000 ambulatory health care organizations across the United States are accredited by AAAHC. Not all ambulatory health care organizations seek accreditation; not all that undergo the rigorous on-site survey process are granted accreditation. The accreditation covers PRHS clinics in both Burney and Alturas, CA.

Ambulatory health care organizations seeking accreditation by AAAHC undergo an extensive self-assessment and on-site survey by AAAHC expert surveyors – physicians, nurses, and administrators who are actively involved in ambulatory health care. The survey is consultative and educational, presenting best practices to help an organization improve its care and services.

“Accreditation has been a longstanding goal for PRHS. It is nice to be recognized for these efforts, but more importantly, we want our patients to be assured they can expect quality care from our clinics.” stated Lauri Hayward, PRHS Board Chairperson.

About Pit River Health Service ( www.pitriverhealthservice.org ):

Pit River Health Service is the primary healthcare system for the Pit River Tribe of the Intermountain region, but also welcomes non-native patients. In rural northeast California, where primary care services can be few and far between, PRHS clinics provide an important access point for the community. This is especially true because PRHS gladly accepts Medi-Cal, Medicare, and a wide variety of other healthcare coverage plans.

PRHS is a non-profit 501(c)(3) ambulatory health clinic first established in 1979. The purpose of PRHS is to serve the entire community with special focus on the American Indian population. Services offered include medical, dental, and behavioral health services, transportation, outreach, and senior nutrition. PRHS has two clinics, one is located at the base of the Burney Mountain in Burney, Ca and the other is located on the Pit River XL reservation near Alturas, Ca. PRHS will soon be opening a third location for behavioral health and outreach services in downtown Alturas. We are open to Native and non-Native patients and accept Medi-Cal, Partnership, Medicare, and most private insurances. We value all our patients and as our mission statement says, we provide the highest quality healthcare services to them.

About AAAHC ( www.aaahc.org ):

The Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care (AAAHC) is a private, non-profit organization formed in 1979. AAAHC is a nationally recognized leader in developing standards to advance and promote patient safety, quality care, and value for ambulatory health care through peer-based accreditation processes, education, and research. A certificate of accreditation is awarded to organizations that are found to be in compliance with AAAHC Standards.

AAAHC currently accredits more than 6,000 organizations in a wide variety of ambulatory health care settings including ambulatory surgery centers, community health centers, medical and dental group practices, medical home practices, and managed care organizations, as well as Indian and student health centers, among others. They are also the official accrediting organization for the US Coast Guard.

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Filed under Burney, health, Pit River Tribe

Burney Basin Days Book Sale to support library – $5 for a bag of books

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June 25, 2018 · 8:57 pm

Haven Humane Society Vaccination Clinic Tuesday, June 26

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June 25, 2018 · 8:48 pm

Weaver and Avocado on the PCT

When my daughter Hana Lyn, who is visiting from Maryland, found out that there is a lady in Burney who sells Mary Kay, she was so happy. She had run out of foundation. So Linda messaged Bobbi Frazier and we arranged to meet at 11 a.m. on Tuesday at the Word of Live Assembly of God (WOLA) for resupply.

When we arrived, the WOLA coffee shop and lobby were buzzing with activity. Bobbi was there and so also were two members of a 4K for Cancer Team running from San Francisco to New York. So while Hana Lyn transacted with Bobbik and got a latte, I spoke briefly with one of the team leaders for the 4K Run, Cheyenne Greenside. Kathy Newton who was organizing hospitality for the runners during their rest stop in Burney, told me that they would be having a barbecue at WOLA that evening and invited me to come take pictures for an article. (See 4K Runners Grateful for Burney Hospitality).

Bon preparing a drink for Weaver at the coffee shop

In the meantime, I noticed several PCT hikers in the coffee shop. Five more hikers were enjoying the hospitality of WOLA. Two of them were heading back to the trail that day and three of them were planning to rest, resupply, and stay for the night.

I managed to chat with the two who were planning to trek on that day.

Rebekah Archer is a charming, thoughtful young lady from Melbourne Australia who is flip-flopping (skip-hiking) the trail. Her trail name is Weaver. She began solo hiking in Campo on April 9. As she hiked through the Southern California desert she made several friends with whom she hiked. Rebekah said she saw a lot of rattlesnakes in the south.

When they reached Lone Pine (Mile 788.8), she chose to skip the Sierras and hike north from Chester. Hiking from Chester to Burney she has seen a lot of deer but no bear yet. I told her she may well see one in this area.

After she passes through the Northern Cascades to Canada she plans to return and hike south through the high Sierras after the snow has melted.

In the midst of her journey north, Rebekah will take two weeks off from the trail to spend time with friends from Australia who are coming for a two week visit in San Francisco. Then she will rejoin the hikers she met earlier in the desert and hike to Canada with them. Rebekah has planned her hike so she can enjoy, the “best of all worlds.”

Avocado from Frankfurt Germany

The second PCT hiker I talked with in the coffee shop was a young thru-hiker from Frankfurt Germany. His trail name is Avocado. He started from Campo on March 28. This is the first time that he has done such a long hike. He has hiked the mountains of Europe but never longer than two weeks.

Avocado said that what impresses him about the PCT is the “diversity of beauty full of extreme contrast” that he has experienced on his journey through the desert, the High Sierras, the Southern Cascades, Hat Creek Ridge, and then descending into the forests of Burney Basin. He is looking forward to seeing Burney Falls, and then passing through Mt. Shasta, into the forests of Oregon and the Northern Cascades in Washington.

Just before leaving Germany for his adventure, Avocado completed his undergraduate degree in sociology from Frankfurt University. As he is walking north through the wilderness, he is pondering whether he should continue his studies or begin his career.

From the point of view of a sociologist, Avocado said that the PCT culture is a “tiny special society.” It is international. There are people of all ages and backgrounds making the journey for varied reasons. There are day hikers, section hikers, through hikers, and hip hoppers. Trail angels support and encourage the hikers and businesses in small rural towns cater to their needs. Rugged outdoor adventure interfaces with hi-tech social media and special PCT apps to facilitate the journey. There is a fluid blending of individualism and group formation that enriches the PCT family. Avacado said that he may write a short paper on it in the future.

He said that he met only one person hiking through the snow in the Sierras without a cell phone. Avocado considers his phone to be not just a means of communication but a safety device insuring location and rescue in case of mishap in a treacherous area.

Weaver relaxes at Burney Falls Park

After talking with Avocado, Hana Lyn, my wife Linda, and I headed to Burney Falls to hike the Loop. While there, we ran into Weaver again, sitting at a picnic table writing in her journal. She was planning to have an ice cream before visiting the falls and heading north.

Hana Lyn, with her new Mary Kay foundation, had several opportunities to snap selfies by the falls and on the bridge over Burney Creek.

 

Hana Lyn by the lynn at Burney Falls

Selfie on the bridge over Burney Creek

Ah! The best of all worlds!

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Filed under Burney, Burney Falls, Pacific Crest Trail, Word of Life Assembly of God