Monthly Archives: December 2018

A wonderful Christmas meal at Grace Community Bible Church

The Winkelman family and their relatives and friends served a wonderful Christmas meal to more than 50 members of the Burney community at the Grace Community Bible Church from noon to 2 p.m. on Christmas Day.

More than 50 meals served at the church

Another two dozen meals were delivered to house-bound residents or provided for take-out. The meal consisted of roast turkey, baked ham, mashed potatoes and gravy, sweet potatoes and greens. For dessert, guests had a choice of apple, pecan, or pumpkin pie. Each guest also received a Christmas present.

A scrumptious buffet

The dinner is an act of love performed by the entire Winkelman family. Reverend Henry Winkelman has been the pastor of Grace Bible Community Church for three decades. He and his wife Penny have nine children. One of their adult sons Jeremy, had the idea six years ago to host a dinner for people in the community that had no place to go for Christmas. The family and their in-laws have been performing this service since then.

Working hard in the kitchen

Diners were grateful for the opportunity to share a joyful Christmas meal in company with others.

One guest told Mrs. Winkelman, “I am so grateful. If you didn’t do this, we would be home alone.”

Jesus said, “Let your light so shine before men, that they may see your good works and give glory to your Father who is in heaven..”

Amen! Praise God!

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Trouble at Ogiba’s Restaurant

Richard Koras and Andrea Ogiba are a hard-working young couple pursuing a dream. On November 21 they opened a diner and bakery in Johnson Park where the Frosty’s used to be. They named it Ogiba’s after Andrea’s family name.

Andrea Ogiba pursuing a dream

“My dad, Andrew Ogiba was the start of my inspiration for loving to bake. When he passed away my Nana Pat helped expand the horizon. They are a big part of all of this.”

Richard, soon to turn 30, and Andrea, 25, were married in April. They have two children, Andrew, 5, and Natalia, 2. Richard is a former Marine. He was stationed at Camp Pendleton where he worked as a Avionics Technician doing electrical work on the Huey and Cobra AH1-W and UH1-N helicopters. Both Richard and Andrea are seeking to further their education. Andrea is pursuing online studies with Escoffier School of Culinary Arts to receive a pastry certificate. Richard is working toward a degree in computer information systems. Richard is also working three days a week at Ray’s market.

The couple’s goals for the restaurant are to “support our family, give back to the community, and expand.” Currently the restaurant is open from 4 a.m. to 2 p.m. In the future they hope to serve dinner also.

The couple worked hard for six months to prepare the building for their opening. Beginning in June, they replaced the water main, painted the walls, installed tiling in the floor, put in new sinks, improved fire prevention, repaired gas leaks and did a lot of cleaning. They had hoped to open by August 1, but completing the work and going through the regulatory process prolonged the opening till late November.

Two weeks before opening someone stole Andrea’s cell phone. Shortly after, one panel of the to-go window was broken. The perpetrator did not climb through the window but reached through and grabbed some valves off of the counter. Ogiba suspects that the thief was hoping to steal some tools but couldn’t get in because of the jagged broken glass.

After the business opened, word began to spread that there was a new restaurant and bakery in the area. Business began to pick up.

Ogiba said, “People were excited and eager to try the food. The response was good.  Sometimes it is breakfast and sometime it is lunch, But the fresh baked goods always sell out. The demand for baked goods is more that my two hands can handle. I do all the baking and no one else knows my recipes.”

Then in the wee hours of the morning of Monday, December 17, a thief removed the plastic covering from the to-go window and stole $200 worth of bacon, plus five pounds of sausage, and a loaf of banana bread. Richard recovered the window and reinforced it with boarding.

Inside view of broken window

That did not deter the thief however. The next night he struck again forcing the board back and shattering the other panel of glass so that he could slide the window open and climb in again. This time he stole shredded cheese, bacon bits, Crisco, three more loaves of banana bread, and some Pam. Then he got out through the back door.

Outside view of Broken window

“It was as though he had a grocery list, and he wanted more banana bread. He had to search for it because I had hidden it but he found it.” said Andrea.

She was particularly aggravated that the crook had stolen the Crisco because it was her son Andrew’s fifth birthday and she needed it to prepare the cake.

Richard and Andrea come in every evening to prepare and bake for the next morning. They work through the evening into the night. Then they go home to rest and return the next morning at 3:30 to open up. They estimate that the thief comes between 1:30 a.m. when the last patrol passes through Johnson Park and the time of their return. Ogiba estimates that the combined cost for repair to the window and the stolen goods is over $500.

The response of the people living in the community to the burglaries has been overwhelmingly supportive.

“People want to help. They are angry that this has happened. They are afraid that we may close the business and leave,” Ogiba said.

Many have come to express their support and desire to help. The incidents have been reported to the Sheriff’s Department.

The couple remains firm in their determination to succeed.

Andrea declared, “This is something that I’ve dreamed about for a long time. We’re not going to let it get taken away so easily. We’re not going anywhere!”

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Traveling in the Mainstream of Love: The Life and Music of Alex Colvin

An essay by Catherine Morton

Alex in Baltimore ca. 2005

Local folk musician Alex Colvin has been drawn to music since he was a young boy growing up in Montana in the 1960’s. I met Alex six years ago, in my small town of Fall River Mills, CA when he was performing at our local pub. From there, I was fortunate enough to be able to watch him perform several times, often late at night, after all the other patrons went home. He would pick up his guitar and start strumming before settling in for a variety show of folk music, blues, tin-pan alley, and my personal favorite, cowboy poetry. He is an unassuming, kindly looking gentleman with an easy smile. With just a guitar, harmonica, and a folksy-blues style of vocals, Alex’s music emanates a comfortable sincerity with every note. He is mostly self-taught but well-educated on his musical roots and a natural storyteller. John Alexander Colvin, 68, of Burney, CA is man with passion, soul, and depth. We sat down to talk about his musical background, influences, and philosophy.

Alex grew up listening to his mom’s favorite music which included her favorite jazz albums. “Louis Armstrong and the Hot Five as well as other jazz musicians from the hot jazz era have always been a favorite. That style of music (carried on through Louis Prima and Brian Seltzer) has a recurring timelessness. I also like the old tin-pan alley songwriters who, by the way, were also an influence on Paul McCartney and the Beatles. My mom and aunt’s also used to sing a lot of the songs from the thirties and forties kind of like the Andrews Sisters. It was a lot of fun and laid a foundation for me that music was fun.” (Colvin)

As a child, Alex discovered a love for singing through his mother’s example and through participating in church and school choirs. He particularly loved singing old hymns and began to study piano. The piano lessons gave him a brief introduction to reading sheet music and music theory. The piano lessons did not stick, but when he was 15 years old, Alex picked up a guitar so he could accompany himself singing. After briefly studying music theory at the University of Montana in the 1970’s, Alex became a lay missionary. “In my early 20’s I was writing a lot of songs and wanted to play to influence the world, convey a message of love and peace and make enough money to survive. When I was 23, I became a missionary and for years played primarily to accompany worship or uplift although I continued to write songs for self-expression.” (Colvin)

When asked about his musical favorites and inspirations, Alex can list such a wide range of artists that it is easy to understand why his musical talent has so much depth. Like, I suspect, most young people with a guitar, Alex challenged himself to learn and play as many songs as he could. He told me at one point, he knew over 300 cover songs. His goal was to learn songs he liked, try to make them his own, and play them from the heart.

The concept of playing from the heart has been a cornerstone of Alex’s musical philosophy all along. Almost 20 years ago, he experienced a type of rebirth as a musician and found that he still had a passion for performing. “About the age of 50, I began playing music publicly again as a singer-songwriter. I went through a new period of songwriting and interacting with other artists, poets, and songwriters. I hoped to make a living doing it and hoped that my songs would become known. I also wanted to help encourage and foster other musicians so I participated in and hosted open mics. Then I spent a period of time when I concentrated more on art and painting than music. Subsequently, I have focused on just gaining wisdom and using my talents to uplift, unify and edify people.” (Colvin)

Alex at Hat Creek Beer and Wine Fest 2017

Today, Alex can be found living a peaceful life in a rural mountain community where he routinely plays at the local senior center. He performs at small, local festivals, fundraisers, and hosts a monthly sing-along at a local mental health facility. Through his music, he embodies his philosophy of always trying to lift people up. However, he is not without wit or humor as can be found in his repertoire of music. His original songs include titles like; Traveling in the Mainstream of Love, Don’t Think About It, No Reason for this Conversation, Pink Underwear, and Sitting by the Lake, and he lists Get Together by Jesse Colin Young; Just Like A Woman by Dylan; Be My Baby by the Rondelles, Me and Bobby McGee by Kris Kristofferson as some of his favorite oldies to play. The rest of his selected playlist was broken down for me by genre. In jazz: St. James Infirmary by Cab Calloway; Blues: Nobody Knows You When You’re Down and Out by Eric Clapton, Stormy Monday by Allman Brothers; Western: Don’t Fence Me In and Back in the Saddle Again by Gene Autry; Rock: Sultans of Swing by Dire Straits; and Gospel: Just a Closer Walk With Thee, Sweet Sweet Spirit, and It is No Secret.

When he performs, Alex’s musical influence and eclectic tastes are apparent. He mainly plays guitar and will sometimes accompany himself on harmonica. In the past, he has played mandolin and a little slide guitar but not so much anymore. “Sometimes,” he says, “I like to play bongos for fun.” Alex’s performances can be described as simple in that he doesn’t have a big set up and requires very little introduction. A singer-songwriter Yamaha Stagepass 300 system for guitar and microphone is all he needs to fill a room with his music. I asked Alex about how he approaches his performances because, as I have seen firsthand, he moves so seamlessly from one song to the next that it feels like a conversation with a friend. The stories in between and the transitions feel organic and always fit the mood and event. On the subject of planning he said, “I usually have a prepared set list that I have worked on but I always go with the flow. I like to combine conversation, story-telling, and even philosophical speculation with the musical performance.” (Colvin)

The influences in Alex’s musical journey have blended together to give him what I would consider to be a unique style all his own. “The first songs I remember hearing on the radio were Travelling Man by Ricky Nelson and I’ve Told Every Little Star by Linda Scott. I also liked Hey Hey Paula by Paul and Paula. And then of course I was a baby boomer of the sixties so I was strongly influenced by surfer music, the Beatles and British Invasion, early Bee Gees, Donovan, Barry McGuire and folk music. Folk music lead me into Woody Guthrie and also into blues artists like John Lee Hooker, Leadbelly, and Mississippi John Hurt. Other primary influences were Bob Dylan, Van Morrison, Jesse Colin Young, Neil Young, and Quicksilver Messenger Service. Early county influences were Hank Williams, Patsy Cline, Buck Owens, and Kris Kristofferson. All of these musicians and singers have inspired me and shaped my own music.”(Colvin) Alex said he would label his style of music as American Folk, New Orleans Jazz, and Blues, so it’s a combination of music derived from European and African American sources (Titon, 2009).

Alex is passionate about spreading his message of love, peace, and hope in his community. He may lack formal musical education but has more than made up for that with his desire to fulfill himself and the lives of others with a positive message. He said that nowadays he loves to simply play with and for friends in homes and small get-togethers. He is a talented artist with no discernible hubris who believes in using gifts to serve. Our interview ended with me asking him about what impact he hopes his music has on the community. I will close with his answer because I honestly cannot sum up what this man and musician is about better than he does.

It was truly a pleasure to spend time with him for this project. ” I think that there has always been a meaningful aspect to my music that people have related to, combined with an element of humor and fun. Some of my songs are a bit goofy but there is always a message that has the potential to change people’s lives: to help them introspect, discover themselves, come closer to God, and live better lives. I hope that some of my songs live on and help to create a better world.”

References:
Colvin, Alex. Personal interview. 8 Dec. 2018.
Titon, J.T. Worlds of Music: An Introduction to the Music of the World’s Peoples.     Schirmer/Thomson Learning, 2009.

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Laura Williams gives “Christmas in Burney” concert at Life Hope Center

On Saturday evening December 22, Christian singer/songwriter and recording artist Laura Williams gave a wonderful concert at the Life Hope Center on Main Street in Burney. The program was titled “Christmas in Burney: God With Us.”

Laura Williams Sings All That I Need

Laura began by introducing John 3:16,”For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten son, that whosever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life,” as the central theme of Christmas.

Then she combined message, testimony, and song to make for a meaningful and delightful evening of inspirational entertainment. In her clear soulful voice, she sang a variety of Christian songs and carols. She led everyone present in singing “Silent Night.” She shared an original song “All That I  Need.” She also sang a version of Leonard Cohen’s beautiful song “Hallelujah!” with new lyrics she had written herself to reflect her personal testimony of faith.

The audience responded to her music with resounding applause and a chorus of “Amen!”, “Hallelujah!” and “Praise the Lord!”

After her performance, host Pastor Jerrod Boling shared a 10 minute homily exploring the meaning of the words “Merry Christmas” and “Emmanuel.” We experience the joy of Christmas when we realize and experience that Jesus made it possible for God to live with us in a deeply personal relationship. He encouraged us to read our Bibles daily and affirmed his belief that Jesus is returning soon.

Boling is an Iraq War veteran. He shared about his experience of Christmas during the war, how much he cherished the opportunities that he had to talk with his wife on the phone, and how she wrote to him every day. This is the kind of longing and intimacy that we should have for God in our lives.

After his brief talk, Ms. Williams sang a final song. Then Boling invited everyone to stay for refreshments and closed the program in prayer.

Most of the people stayed to enjoy conversation over a meal of veggies, humus, healthy baked goods, cookies, and kale chips (amazingly delicious).

The Life Hope Center will be offering a number of Bible studies including the Book of Revelation. In addition they will offer several classes including a cooking class by RN Health Educator Coral Parrish.

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Parks in Burney – Looking Forward

Winter season has arrived. The snow and cold weather may be coming over the next few month. During these months, the preponderance of social and recreational activities are indoors.

However, soon it will be Spring and, like the bears, we will be emerging from our dens to enjoy the fresh air and sunshine. That’s why we have parks.

Burney has several parks and recreational areas. These include but are not limited to Washburn Park, Lions Civic Park, Bailey Park and areas along Burney Creek.

For several months now, a group including representatives from several organizations related to park maintenance and use has been meeting to discuss the needs and the future of parks in Burney. The group plans to continue meeting on a regular basis, perhaps once a month. Lisa Barry, Community Organizer for Shasta County Health & Human Services, has been helping to facilitate these ad hoc meetings.

Wouldn’t it be wonderful to have a common vision, suitable to the times and reflecting the needs and desires of the community, for future use, improvement, beautification, and maintenance of park properties in Burney?

In order to shape such a vision, creative input from the community is essential!

Currently, children play in the parks, little league holds, games, families go there for celebrations and outings, Kid Fit holds events in the summer, etc. The Chamber has hosted a Meet the Candidates for Mayor event in the park.

What ideas do you have for new or additional activities – Art in the parks? Music in the parks? Theater in the park? Storytelling or nature talks? Additional youth fitness activities? Community exercise or yoga in the parks? Educational or inspirational events. Games? Pot lucks? Whatever!

What activities would you, your children, or your organization enjoy? What improvements or additional equipment?

Parents, civic leaders, teenagers, teachers, counselors, youth leaders, fitness advocates, church leaders, citizens of Burney! Put your thinking caps on. If you have an idea or request, please send it to Lisa Barry at lbarry@co.shasta.ca.us

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2 Wheels 2 Mobility awards bike to Chris Herrrera

Bill Campbell presented a bicycle to Chris Herrera at the Alternate School, just outside the IM Fairgrounds, on Wednesday morning December 19.

The bicycle was awarded on behalf of 2 Wheels 2 Mobility, a project of the Burney-Fall River Bicycle Association that provides refurbished bikes to local citizens in need of transportation in the area.

Bill Campbell presents a bicycle to Chris Herrera Photo courtesy of Lisa Barry

Mr. Campbell said, “Chris came to my attention with Mr. Estes Letter to the Editor (Mt Echo) describing how Chris ran from his Fall River Mills home to the Intermountain Fairgrounds, four miles, to return keys he had inadvertently taken home.  Important fact is Chris ran after midnight.”

Describing Chris, Hummer Estes, one of his employers, said “Ethics and integrity, two words that fit hand in hand with this kid.”

This is the fourth bicycle awarded by the “2 Wheels 2 Mobility” program.

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Mt. View students give out Christmas presents at Burney Annex

Three students from Mt. View High School, Elias Avelar, Danell Brumbaugh, and Jordan Potts, gave out presents to 55 patients at the Burney Annex on Wednesday afternoon December 19.

Danell Brumbaugh, Teacher Becky Mock, patient Sally Schmidt, Elias Avelar, Superintendent Greg Hawkins, and Vice Principal Becky Torgrimson

The presents, hand-handmade by students, included pinecone-peanut butter-bird seed bird feeders, homemade snowflake decorations with glitter, and water bottles and bags filled with sugar-free candy and gum.

The activity was part of the students’ empathy unit. School Nurse Karen Van Cleave comes to the school once a week to teach a class on empathy.

According to teacher Becky Mock, the purpose of the unit is to “help students to put themselves in the shoes of others and serve people in need.”

Teacher Lori Carlson suggested the idea of giving gifts to patients at the Annex. The visit to the Annex also helps to fulfill the students’ community service requirement for graduation.

Teacher Becky Mock, FRJUSD Superintendent Greg Hawkins, BHS Vice Principal Becky Torgrimson, and MVHS Secretary Shaun Davis accompanied the students as they delivered the presents.

 

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