Category Archives: Burney

Veterans Honored on Armed Services Day at Burney Cemetery

Bugler Gearge Matthews playing taps

Veterans from the American Legion and Veterans of Foreign Wars gathered at the Burney Cemetery on Bailey Street on Armed Forces Day, Saturday May 19, to hold an “Echo Taps” ceremony and rifle salute as a special tribute to men and women in the U.S. military.

Armed Forces Day was instituted on August 21, 1949, by Secretary of Defense Louis Johnson who served under President Harry Truman. Previously there had been separate single day celebrations for each branch of the military. The Truman administration unified all branches of the military under the Department of Defense.

Armed Forced Day is celebrated annually on the third Saturday of May. The first official celebration was held on May 20, 1950. B-36 Bombers flew over state capitals, a march was led by more than 10,000 veterans and troops in Washington, D.C., and over 33,000 people participated in a New York City parade. President John F. Kennedy declared Armed Forces Day a national holiday in 1961.

Commander Arveson explains the meaning and history of Echo Taps and Armistice Day as Scout Chapman and Honor Guard member Larry Martin hold flags

Elizabeth Luck singing the National Anthem

Commander Jim Arveson welcomed several dozen people to the ceremony and acted as master of ceremonies. After the Pledge of Allegiance, Elizabeth Luck sang the National Anthem. Public Safety Chaplain Reverend Henry Winkelman led the invocation.

Commander Arveson then explained the meaning and history of Armed Services Day and “Taps.” “Taps” is a bugle call played at dusk, during flag ceremonies, and at military funerals. The official military version is played by a single bugle or trumpet. “Echo Taps” is a cascading antiphonal taps played by multiple buglers for special memorial ceremonies. Arveson also read some of the lyrics that have been written to accompany the “Taps” melody. Bugler George Matthews was present to play “Taps” at the end of the program.

After his talk, Pastor Winkelman offered a closing prayer.

Pastor Winkelmand offering prayer

Honor Guard members, Martin McAbee, Steve Powell, Jim Ellis, Jimmy Cusick, Bob Van De Weerd, Herbert McKinney, and Dennis Lopez came to attention and fired a rifle salute.

Honor Guard rifle salute

Bugler George Matthews concluded the ceremony by playing “Taps.”

Boy Scout Leaders George Chapman, Cheri Chapman, and James Chapman and Scouts Thomas Chapman and Dedric Ugbinada from Burney Troop 38 also attended and participated in the celebration.

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Suicide Prevention Training May 18 at Circle of Friends

Suicide Prevention Training May 18 at Circle of Friends

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Special Presentation of bicycle to Sammy Nalton at Rotary

Bill Campbell presented a restored bicycle to Ms. Sammy Nalton at the Rotary Club meeting at Gepetto’s Pizza in Burney on May 3. The presentation was part of 2 Wheels 2 Mobility, a project of the Burney-Fall River Bicycle Association that will provide refurbished bikes to local citizens in need of transportation in the area.

Bill Campbell, Sammy Nalton, and Shaylene Herndon holding Sammy’s Baby Aiyana with bike for Sammy

Shaylene Herndon holding 10 month old Aiyana Nalton

As well as being a past president of the Rotary Club of Burney-Fall River, Campbell is also president of the Burney-Fall River Bicycle Association. In the course of his activities, some people began to donate bicycles that they no longer had use for.

Bill got the idea of refurbishing the bikes and making them available to people in need. He discussed the idea with Cindy Dodds from Tri County Community Network. She liked the idea and referred him to Shaylene Herndon who works at the Community Center in Burney with First 5 Shasta and Bright Futures. Shaylene recommended Sammy as a worthy recipient for the first bicycle.

The Rotary Club of Burney-Fall River Foundation approved a $1000 grant to the Burney-Fall River Bicycle Association for the project. Bill then contacted Redding Sports Ltd with whom he has done business. They agreed to refurbish the bikes at a discount. The cost of repairing Sammy’s bicycle was $104. The result of this collaborative community effort was Thursday’s presentation.

Bill helping to adjust the bike for Sammy with the help of Cindy Dodds

Ms. Herndon introduced Sammy and her ten-month old daughter Aiyana at the Rotary meeting and announced that because Sammy has a little one she has also applied for and received a grant to purchase a trailer in which Aiyana will be able to enjoy a safe ride.

Mr. Campbell also presented Sammy with a nice bicycle helmet and lock that were paid for by a donation from Henry and Fran Patterson.

The Burney-Fall River Bicycle Association was formed to identify and promote bicycle routes and events to attract an infusion of new money into the region. They will continue to offer community service projects related to cycling.

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Filed under Burney, Cycling, Rotary Club of Burney-Fall River, Tri-Counties Community Center

Burney Presbyterian Church celebrates Grand Opening of new internet library

Numerous educational, civic, and religious leaders from the Burney and Intermountain community gathered at the Meeting Place at Burney Presbyterian Church to celebrate the Grand Opening of a new Internet Library.

Rev. Penni Elaine Scarbrough cuts the ribbon as Rev. Watkins, Rev. Scarbrough, and Superintendent Hawkins look on

The Internet Library will be open to the public on Monday, Wednesday and Friday from 3 PM to 6 PM, with priority given to local students doing homework and research for school projects. Job seekers will also be encouraged to utilize the library’s services for creating resumes and researching employment opportunities.

Rev. Penni explaining the purpose of the internet library to Cindy Dodds and Laurie Jacobs

The program began at 3 p.m. with a reception and refreshments. The ribbon cutting ceremony was held at 4 p.m.

The Grand Opening was hosted by Rev. Penni Elaine Scarbrough, pastor of the Burney Presbyterian Church and her husband Rev. Tim Scarbrough who serves as Administrative Director. Rev. Rob Watkins, Presbyter of the Presbytery of Sacramento came to speak. Rev. Leon Thompson, retired Presbyterian minister from Weed, also attended with his wife Betty.

Community leaders listening to speakers

Amongst educational leaders who came for the opening were Greg Hawkins, Superintendent for the Fall River Joint Unified School District, Burney Junior-Senior High Principal Ray Guerrero, Burney Elementary Principal Marcy Schmidt, elementary teacher Shelly Myers and her husband Rev. Bill Myers from Glen Burn Church. Rev. Myers also serves as a volunteer in the Fall River and Burney elementary schools. Former Superintendent of Schools Larry Snelling and his wife Peggy also attended.

Other civic leaders who came included Cindy Dodds and Laurie Jacobs from the Tri Counties Community Center; Burney Chamber of Commerce President Sandra McCullar; former President of the Burney-Fall River Rotary Club Bill Campbell, and Michael Kerns. Several community volunteers including Lou Hawk also attended.

Rev. Tim Scarbrough welcomed the people and began the ribbon cutting ceremony with a prayer.

Rev. Penni Scarbrough gave a brief talk in which she said the mission of the new internet library is “to enable, enlighten, and encourage people to grow through learning.”

She emphasized that the library is not just for the congregation of the Burney Presbyterian Church but is open for all students and job seekers in the community.

Superintendent Hawkins spoke of the changes that had taken place in education since he began teaching in the 1980’s. He emphasized the increasing importance of technology and told the audience that all junior and senior high school students now have Google Chrome notebooks as also do elementary school students from the second grade up.

He also said that many of the students do not have internet access in their homes and therefore stressed the value of a facility such as this where they can not only use the available computers, but also access the Internet with their notebooks using the library’s Wi-Fi.

The final speaker was Rev. Watkins. He gave a touching talk stressing two points. The first was that the Meeting Place was there to serve the whole community. The Burney Presbyterian Church is the most northern church in the Sacramento Presbytery which consists of 7,000 members throughout Northern California. Those churches that are most effective are those that are engaged in serving their communities. The Presbytery is happy that the church in Burney is striving to serve as a Meeting Place and supports that effort.

In the second point, he said that Jesus may never have talked about the Internet, but he did talk a lot of about the importance of children. Quoting from the Book of Proverbs he stressed the importance of children seeking wisdom and understanding. He spoke of these in terms of understanding oneself and the world. Rev. Watkins told how his son has now worked on five continents and hopes to work in all seven. He said that the Internet Library would be a “safe place” where children can use the Internet to “awaken to the wonders of the world” in a healthy educational environment.

Reverend Watkins affirmed his conviction that “every person is an unique act of God’s creative will.”

God is good and gracious and every child is precious. Every child, indeed every person, deserves the opportunity to develop their talents and abilities in a healthy loving environment in order to improve themselves and make a better world, perhaps even to help create the Kingdom of Heaven on Earth.

The Meeting Place is located at 20435 Marquette St. in Burney, CA. For more information about the Internet Library call (530) 335-2271.

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Filed under Burney, Burney Presbyterian Church, Chamber of Commerce, Churches, Schools, Tri-Counties Community Center, youth

Indoor Yard Sale for Senior Nutrition Center May 4-5

There will be an indoor yard sale at the Community Center Friday May 4th and Saturday May 5th. The sale will begin at 8:30 a.m. both mornings.

Donations for the yard sale are still being accepted. Call 335-4979. If you have items you would like to donate, somebody from the center can come to pick them up.

The Community Center is located at 37477 Hwy 299. Proceeds from the sale will go to benefit the Senior Nutrition Program.

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Intermountain Preparedness Group holds interagency exercise to prepare for mass causality events

On Thursday April 26 from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m., about two dozen representatives from emergency response units, healthcare facilities, and support services met at the Burney Fire Hall to conduct a “Mass Casualty Table Top Exercise.”

Burney Fire District Chief Monte Keady facilitating the discussion

The meeting was a function of the Intermountain Preparedness Group that was formed to “attain shared preparedness and bring stability during crisis.” Agencies attending the meeting included CAL FIRE, Shasta County Fire Service, McArthur Fire Protection District, Burney Fire Protection District, Mayers Memorial Hospital District, Mountain Valley Health Centers, Pit River Health Service, Sierra Emergency Medical Services Alliance, Southern Cascades EMS District, Shasta County OEM, Shasta County Health and Human Services, and the American Red Cross,  .

The exercise was facilitated by Burney Fire Protection District Chief Monte Keady. Participants were organized into three groups according to their mission and function. The three groups were: 1) Fire, Hazmat, and Emergency Services; 2) Health Care Facilities; and 3) Support Services.

Chief Keady began the exercise by presenting a scenario of a mass causality event. The scenario involved a 40 vehicle fire on Hwy 299 in which 40 vehicles were involved. It included injuries and fatalities, a fire that began to spread, and a hazardous waste spill.

After briefing the audience on the situation, Keady asked each group to engage in a fifteen minute discussion about how they would respond to this emergency in the first 60-90 minutes.

Group discussions in progress

Afterward, a representative from each group presented a summary of their discussion. In their summaries they discussed how they would plan, organize and staff each of their operations, set up a command structure and communications, organize relief efforts and transportation, provide services, set up shelters, etc. After each presentation there was an opportunity for question and answer and open discussion.

Mayers Hosptial CEO Louis Ward reporting for the Health Services discussion group

The rest of the agenda had two more scenario updates followed by group, intergroup, and open discussions. The last scenario update involved the close of the incident. The final event of the exercise was “Lessons learned,” a thirty minute period of shared reflection during which participants could share “Aha moments.”

The meeting also included breaks during which participants could share refreshments and talk on a less formal basis.

For more information about the Intermountain Preparedness Group, citizens can contact any of the participating agencies.

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Filed under Burney, Fire Departments, health, Law enforcement, Mayers Memorial Hospital, Mountain Valleys Health Cliinic, Pit River Tribe, Public Safety

Texas School Girl does National History Day project on “Radium Girl” cases

In late March, I received a phone call from a high school student in Texas named Nirvana Khan. She told that she was preparing a website for National History Day 2018.

More that half a million middle and high school students and over 30,000 teachers nationwide participate in National History Day each year. This year’s theme is Conflict and Compromise.

Ms. Khan told me that for her project she had chosen the legal battles that took place from the  1920’s to the 1940’s involving young women who had suffered disastrous illnesses from radium poisoning resulting from their employment painting watch dials.

Because my grandfather, Ray Berry, had represented Grace Fryer and some other New Jersey girls in their case against US Radium Corporation beginning in 1927, she asked if we could do an interview for her project. I agreed and we had a very nice talk.

Her website Legion Of The Doomed: How The Radium Girls’ Compromise Changed Public Safety is now completed and online. Ms. Khan succinctly and fluently provides the background of the radium craze in the early part of the 20th century, covers the conflict with the corporations, describes the compromise and settlement of the case, and discusses the aftermath and effect that the cases had on subsequent labor and worker safety law. Each section is full of fascinating newspaper articles and quotes.

In her process paper for the project, Ms. Khan describes her work,

I started by reading modern news articles about their case and gradually went further to gain a sense of the historical context; this included finding pictures, quotes, and news articles from the time about World War I and the radium craze. While doing so I also stumbled on several scholarly sources such as law reviews and scientific studies on the radium girls, which helped me understand their historical significance. I was able to purchase several books, including Kate Moore’s “The Radium Girls,” which helped me gain a thorough knowledge of the women and feel like I knew them personally. From there I found many newspaper articles and photographs from their case, as well as a documentary “Radium City” where one can see interviews of the living radium girls and the families of the dead. Finally, I circled back again to modern news articles in order to properly define their legacy.

Ms. Khan also said

The lawsuit filed against the corporations is very interesting because of the  lack of regard the corporations had for their female employees, the fact that the dial painters triumphed against such stacked odds, and the revolutionary nature of the case. The compromise reached at the end of the case by both parties following the girls’ victory cleared the way for workers’ rights and compensation cases, as well as changed America’s view of radium and knowledge of radium necrosis. This led to safety measures for the public that survived through World War II and beyond.

Her website also has a 16 page bibliography that is a wonderful resource for further investigation.

Currently, she is participating in the state level History Day competition in Texas. Competition in Texas is fierce so she is not sure if she will make it to the national competition. The National History Day Competition will be held June 10-14 at the University of Maryland in College Park Maryland.

Best wishes, Nirvana Khan! I hope you win it all. You have performed a great service

See also

Case argued by Raymond H. Berry featured in new book by British author

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Filed under Burney, youth