Category Archives: Fall River Mills

Pictures of Heritage Day 2017

Heritage Day 2017 on Sunday October 8 was wonderful. The weather was beautiful. Great music! Cider and dutch oven goodies! Wagon rides! Folks dressed up in period costumes. Lots of fun activities from the 1800’s. I’ll let some pictures speak for themselves.

Nicki Carlisle, the Zuilleger family and the Shooting Stars

 

The Shooting Stars – Natalie, Katie, Tahlia, and Helaina

Here’s a link to music by the Shooting Stars at Heritage Day 2017.

North State Fiddlers

 

Meg with Jack and Jill

 

Nina Kammener, Diana Sophia Green, and Kayla Oilar

 

Beading

 

Candle making

 

Candle making

Making a pine doll

 

These girls made some fine pine dolls

 

Craig Harrington at Heritage Days

 

Manning the cider press

 

Veronica Sloan and Dutch Oven Cooking

 

Pit River Pioneer Thom Sloger with Linda Colvin at an 1840’s tent site

 

Pit River Pioneers

 

Walt Libal displaying old guns

 

Sawbucking

 

Tug O War

 

Cub Scouts from Pack 38

 

Leos at Heritage Day

For more on Heritage Days see:

Heritage Day At Burney Falls Park 2016
Heritage Day shares the past

 

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Filed under Burney, Burney Falls, Burney Lions Club, Fall River Mills, Music, Pit River Country Events, Rotary Club of Burney-Fall River, youth

Intermountain Parade 2017

I went to the Intermountain Parade in McArthur on September 3. It was a fine tribute to the spirit of the people of the Intermountain area. I admired the fine horses, riders, and the wagons. tractors, and vintage cars that reminded us of our history and heritage. It was encouraging to see the various organizations who serve the community participate. Above all, it was inspiring to see the young people from Girls Scouts, 4-H, the Interact Club, gymnastics, and others who participated in the joyful occasion.

Here are some pictures:

4H Sharing flag etiquette

American Legion Honor Guard

Grand Marshall

Blue Ribbon Award Winner

Intermountain Royalty

A family event

Happy birthday from the Girl Scouts

Intermountain Heritage Foundation

Blue Ribbon Horse

FFA

Peterson Ranch

Interact Club

More Interact Club

Rawhide Cowboys

Young Cowgirl

1957 Fire Truck

Burney 4-H

An old wagon and horses

Caballeros from Burney

Gymnasts

Here come the demolition derby cars

Lots of candy for the kids

 

 

Mustangs pulling an old freight wagon

It goes 80 mph and gets 100 miles to the gallon

A happy crew

A glimpse of the past

Shriners

Meyers Memorial

The Buckhorn

 

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Filed under 4H, Big Valley, Burney, Fall River, Fall River Mills, Intermountain Fair, McArthur, Pit River Country Events

Fort Crook Lodge 250 give backpacks to second graders

Over the past week, Masons Jim Crockett and George Whitfield from Fort Crook Lodge 250 F&AM  delivered more than 100 backpacks to second graders in the Intermountain area.

George Whitfield and Jim Crockett passing out backpacks at Burney Elementary as teacher Michael von Schalscha and school psychologist Brent Beyer look on

On Friday, August 18 they delivered 12 backpacks to students in Montgomery Creek.

Montgomery Creek (Photo courtesy of Jim Crockett)

On Tuesday August 22, they gave out about 40 backpacks at Fall River Elementary School

and another 40 at Burney Elementary School.

Burney Elementary (Photo courtesy of Jim Crockett)

Then on Thursday August 24, they drove to Big Valley to deliver another 17 back packs to grateful children.

Big Valley (Photo courtesy of Jim Crockett)

This is the 16th year that Fort Crook Lodge 250 has done this program. Each backpack contained a ruler, a composition book, pencils, crayons, and erasers.

At each school, Crockett and Whitfield gave a short presentation before presenting the backpacks.

Crockett and Whitfield explain about the Masons

For instance, at Burney Elementary, the children listened attentively as Master Mason Jim Crockett spoke about the history of the Masons. He told them that this year is the 300th anniversary of Freemasonry.

George Whitfield asked if any of the children had heard of George Washington and explained that George Washington and Benjamin Franklin were both Masons.

To help the children understand the Masons in their own terms, second grade teacher Joy Ford told the children that “the Masons are a club like the Boy Scouts, only for adults.”

Joy Ford helped the students to understand the Masons

The children appreciated the explanation and nodded and smiled.

The three core principles of Freemasonry are brotherly love, relief, and truth.

Mason George Whitfield shakes hands with a young student as he hands him a backpack

After hearing that the Masons were 300 years old, one young boy raised his hand and asked Mr. Crockett, “How old are you.”

“Older than George,” he replied.

“And I’m too old to be asked that question,” Mr. Whitfield quipped as the children laughed.

When questions were finished, all the children lined up in two orderly rows and advanced to share a friendly handshake and receive their pack.

Master Mason Crockett said, “We truly enjoy the kids and their expressions and gratitude in receiving the backpacks with the school supplies inside.”

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Filed under Bieber, Big Valley, Burney, Fall River, Fall River Mills, Montgomery Creek, Schools, youth

Community Meeting on Crime and Homelessness

The Veterans Hall was full on July 11, as hundreds turned out for the community meeting organized by Jen Luck and Mary Rickert. People came not only from Burney but also from Fall River Valley and Montgomery Creek in hope of finding positive solutions to problems of crime and the increase of homelessness in the area.

Jen Luck, Office Manager of the Burney Chamber of Commerce, began the meeting promptly at 6 p.m. and introduced County Supervisor Mary Rickert.

Community meeting on crime and homelessness

Supervisor Rickert gave brief opening remarks. She has been attending similar town meetings throughout our district in the county. She said that the subject is complex and that crime has deep underlying root causes. She said that where there has been the most success dealing with the problem is when people in the community work together and form local groups such as Neighborhood Watch where they monitor their neighborhood and address issues on the local level as they arise.

Mary Rickert addresses the audience

She also mentioned a community-building program called Meet The Neighbors. Meet the Neighbors does not focus only on crime. It’s mission is to give “you and your neighbors powerful tools to communicate, meet, organize, get important local stuff done…”

After sharing her opening remarks, members of the panel introduced themselves. Officials attending included Shasta County Sheriff Tom Bosenko, Lieutenant Tyler Thompson from the Burney Sheriff’s station, Lieutenant Scott Frederick from California Highway Patrol, Nick Truax from Cal Fire, Monte Keady from Burney Fire Protection District, and Rod Armstrong from the Burney Citizen Volunteer Patrol.

The first and main speaker of the evening was Sheriff Bosenko. He spoke for a half hour about the effect of several public safety bills and propositions.  Because the US Supreme Court mandated a reduction in California’s overcrowded prisons, Assembly Bill 109 on Public Safety Realignment was passed in 2011. According to Bosenko, this resulted in the release of 30,000 inmates.

In addition, Proposition 47 reduced penalties for certain crimes and Proposition 57 altered sentencing rules. Many crimes have been reduced from felonies to misdemeanors. As the state prison population has decreased the county jails have filled up. With shorter sentences, recidivism has increased.

Sherriff Tom Bosenko addresses the crowd

Bosenko said that the problems have been compounded by limited resources to maintain facilities and manpower. Officers have to prioritize calls and they are limited as to what they can do by state regulation.

At the same time, Sheriff Bosenko cited statistics indicating that crime is down overall for the Burney, Fall River, and Montgomery Creek area.

He said that panhandling is not against the law, but that if business owners post “no soliciting” or “no trespassing” signs then they can be asked to move on or be prosecuted for trespassing if they don’t comply.

Concerning homelessness, Bosenko said, “All homeless people are not criminals and all criminals are not homeless.”

If people are camped or squatting on private land, they can not be removed unless it is posted “No trespassing.”

He then opened the floor to questions, of which there were many.

Generally speaking the questions and comments fell into three categories: 1) people who wanted to know what the Sheriff’s Department and other law enforcement could do to deal with burglaries, squatting, trash in the woods. etc. 2) People asking what they themselves could do, and 3) people recounting personal stories of problems they had encountered with theft, unruly, or indecent behavior.

One man said, “I came here to find out what you can do for me!”

Another said, “Are you telling us that Sacramento has handcuffed you?” To which Bosenko answered in the affirmative.

There was some advice in regard to burglary and suspicious behavior concerning getting license plate numbers and descriptions, but a lot of the responses concerned regulations and lack of manpower and resources that impeded action.

Cal Fire and Burney Fire Department advised people to notify them if there were any fires in the woods.

The representative from CHP said that their work was mainly in the area of traffic law enforcement and safety, but that they and other law enforcement agencies were also there to back up and work together with local law enforcement.

Monte Keady said that while we are facing current problems we should also be taking action that would address underlying issues and ensure a better future such as mentoring our youth.

When people asked what they could do generally, they were advised to communicate with appropriate law enforcement officers. If violations occurred on US Forest Service Land, people should contact the Forest Service and they would take action. If there were encampments or trash on private land, people should notify the landowners such as Sierra Pacific, PG&E, or United Fruit Growers.

The most sound advice seemed to be that of Mary Rickert to form community associations and work together with their neighbors in cooperation with local public services.

Someone asked about citizen’s arrests. Bosenko said that people could make arrests but they needed to be careful in apprehending people because they may be on drugs, armed or dangerous. Also, if the charges were not successfully prosecuted they could be sued for false arrest.

One lady who had military experience asked about carrying a gun. Bosenko advised her that she had a right for her and her family to walk in public areas and trails, and if they had a concealed weapons permit and felt that there was a need to protect themselves they could carry a weapon.

There were also questions and discussions regarding the Windmill Fund and the Fire Protection Tax. Cal Fire said that most of the money spent from the tax in Shasta County had been to build the fire break near Burney after the fire two years ago.

The room was hot and many left early but a lot of people stayed until the end.

When one attendee said that he felt that more town meetings were necessary not only on these issues but on other issues such as the condition of the parks in Burney, Mary Rickert committed that she would be willing to come up and host a town meeting once a month.

Rod Armstrong from Burney Citizen Patrol

One bright spot towards the end was when a request was made for specific activities volunteers could be involved in, Rickert asked Rod Armstrong from the Citizens Patrol to speak. He described the activities of the patrol and how people could get involved. Several people signed up as volunteers after the meeting. More volunteers are still needed.

There was broad representation of the meeting. Not only were many business people, homeowners and concerned parents present, but also several ministers who would like to address these problems. Tri Counties Community Network was present. Representatives of Circle of Friends also attended. They have had considerable success helping some people to get out of homelessness, and many others overcome substance abuse and addiction.

The meeting ended after 8 p.m. Many stayed until 8:45 to talk with officials and each other.

The next day, Jen Luck said that she is already working on ideas for future meetings. She has researched and joined Meet the Neighbors and hopes that others will do so to create local community groups dedicated to community improvement and practical problem solving.

Since the meeting there has been a lot of conversation on social media, amongst friends, family and neighbors and in several meetings. Some are frustrated but others are determined to find constructive ways to address the situation.

See Wikipedia article on Neighborhood Watch

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Filed under Burney, Chamber of Commerce, Fall River Mills, Johnson Park, Montgomery Creek

Burney Mayor’s Race competes in Hunger Games at Mountain Jubilee

Each year, residents, businesses, and organizations of the Fall River Valley and surrounding areas join together to create a wonderful Mountain Jubilee. It is a delightful display of Inter-Mountain culture and activities organized by the Inter-Mountain Fair Heritage Foundation.

One of the events this year was the Hunger Games. A few weeks ago, Linda and I got a message that Delbert Howard Building was sponsoring a Honorary Burney Mayor’s Race team.

We sent out the challenge to the mayors candidates. We needed four candidates to compete on the team. Ralph Freitas, who is running for Honorary Mayor raising funds for Make A Wish Foundation (Shasta County) said that he would be willing to run. Beth Allison was organizing the race, so Linda called her and she invited Linda and I to participate. She got a fourth volunteer, a young man named Kyle, to be our fourth participant.

Kyle, Linda, Ralph, and Alex

So, in the 100 degree heat on Saturday, June 24, Linda and I headed over to the Inter-Mountain fairgrounds in McArthur. People were socializing, music was playing and a group of young ladies were playing egg roulette on the lawn. The girls were breaking eggs on their heads. Some of the eggs were raw, some were hard boiled.

We didn’t see Beth right away so we headed into the Ingram Hall where it was cooler. Shortly, Ralph joined us.

While we waited we watched some wonderful dancing by the youth of Fall River.

Jazz dancing

 

Color Dance

 

Young ballerinas

 

Tap dancing

 

Song and dance from the Newsies

 

Young couples dancing

It was a really great performance.

Dance ensemble

After the show we went outside to the lawn. The egg-smashing was finished and the Hunger Games were about to begin. Four teams competed. Beth gave each of the competitors a t-shirt: red, yellow, blue, and pink. Judges were chosen.

We competed in a variety of events combining physical activity and food. The first was a board race in which three of us had to walk together on two boards. We did pretty well in the first race and only fell off the boards a few times. Ralph performed well gulping down a fruit salad.

However, when it came my turn to eat a dry burrito our team began to slip. My mouth was dry and it took me eons to chew and swallow the burrito. By the time I finished the other teams were already well ahead. Next Kyle built a lego construction while Linda aced down a pizza. Next, I blew bubbles though a hoop and once again, very slowly, chewed up a maple bar and then blew up a balloon than that I had to pop on another contestant. Then we boarded our way back to the finish line where Ralph finished off a spicy cup of Bloody Mary mix.

Our team came in last, primarily because I am the slowest chewer in Pit River Country. Still it was lots of fun. The emcee invited Ralph to say a few words and he talked about his race for Mayor and invited everyone to come to the opening event of Burney Basin Days for the ice cream social on Thursday night.

Free ice cream. I think I can eat ice cream a lot faster than I can a burrito.

Every year the Mountain Jubilee has been a fun action filled event leading up to the Inter-Mountain Fair.

Thank you so much to the organizers and Delbert Howard Building for giving me a taste of the Mountain Jubilee.

See also:

Mountain Jubilee was lots of fun (2015)

 

 

 

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Filed under Burney, Fall River, Fall River Mills, McArthur, Pit River Country Events

“100 Years of Broadway” at the Mt Burney Theatre

The Fall River Valley Community Choir performed “One Hundred Years of Broadway” at the Mt Burney Theatre on Saturday May 6. Eighteen choir members performed a medley of 50 Broadway hits ranging from the early days of Tin Pan Alley to state-of-the-art contemporary Broadway.

Rev. Bill Myers soloing “If Ever I Would Leave You”

Don Smith directed the choir for the 45 minute review arranged by Mac Huff.

Don Smith directing the choir

Narrator Michael Kerns guided the audience through the history as he introduced each of the six sections of the review.

The performance began with an Opening featuring songs such as “Give My Regards to Broadway,” and “There’s No Business Like Show Business.”

Beautiful voices

The Early Years featured music from Tin Pan Alley greats such as Irving Berlin and Cole Porter.

Setting the Standards included some of the all time great hits by Rogers and Hammerstein. The Golden Years featured classics such as “Hello Dolly,” Try to Remember,” and “Seventy Six Trombones.”

Breaking New Ground rocked the hall with Stu Stoore’s soulful interpretation of “Jesus Christ Superstar.” Melanie Kerns moved the audience to tears as she sang Memory written for the 1981 musical Cats by Andrew Lloyd Webber and Trevor Nunn.

Stu Stoore doing a solo

The historical journey concluded with State of the Art leading us into the new millennium with rousing songs such as “Prepare Ye the Way of the Lord,” and “Broadway Baby.”

Then the choir concluded with a finale of more classic show tunes.

The Finale

Under the direction of Director Smith, the choir did a masterful mix of choral blending and individual performance. Laura Beyer, Melanie Kerns, Alison Maki, Candee Parker, Michael Martin, Penny Rogers, Lynn Stoore, Maggie Torres, Bill Myers, Stu Stoore, Brian Baddeley, Jean Rogers, and Tom Jones all sang solos.

What a treat! The spirit of Broadway definitely descended. Special thanks to Donna Sylvester, owner of Mt Burney Theatre, for hosting the event.

The Spirit of Broadway descends

The Fall River Valley Community Choir will give another performance of the review on May 7 at Ingram Hall in McArthur at 4 p.m. and a shortened version at the Fall River Library on May 20.

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Filed under Art, Burney, Entertainment, Fall River Community Choir, Fall River Mills, McArthur

Bioenergy Cluster Project for the Intermountain Area

On April 11, Garrett Costello and Kayla Trotter, gave a presentation to the Burney Chamber of Commerce on the status of development of the Bioenergy Cluster Project in the Intermountain area.

The project plans include the development of 3 small-scale community based energy facilities. The three proposed facilities are Burney-Hat Creek Bioenergy, Tubit Enterprises, and McArthur Bioenergy.

The activity is supported by California Senate Bill 1122 that establishes a feed-in tariff contract (BioMAT) for small renewable electricity producers  to sell power to Investor Owned Utilities (PG&E)  at higher rates than are offered to larger utility scale power producers. The bill also mandates state-wide procurement of renewable biomass from small facilities that utilize low emission technologies.

Bioenergy is considered carbon neutral and has been recognized by the California Forest Carbon Plan as having a vital role in combating the effects of climate change.

Cal Fire, public and private land owners, and the U.S. Forest Service (via the Wood Innovation Grant), are committed to harvesting downed and diseased material to prevent catastrophic wildfire, and preserve forest health,.

It is hoped that bioenergy facilities will spur economic development, create jobs, strengthen our forest, and bring energy independence to rural mountain communities.

Sponsors of the project include the U.S. Forest Service  and the Fall River Resource Conservation District in cooperation with public and private land owners.

Burney Hat Creek has already completed several critical predevelopment steps. Tubit Enterprises and McArthur Bioenergy are in early stages of development

For more information contact: FRRCD Project Manager Todd Sloat

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Filed under Burney, Fall River Mills, Hat Creek