Category Archives: health

Dr. Daniel Dahle named 2019 “Country Doctor of the Year” by Staff Care

Press release from Staff Care, and AMN Healthcare company:

DALLAS, TX – Serving an area larger than five states and a community 45 miles from the nearest traffic light, Dr. Daniel Dahle is the medical version of a hero in a Clint Eastwood western, keeping the local citizens safe not with six shooters but with over three decades of medical expertise and an unflinching commitment to personalized care.

Dr. Dahle checking a heart

For his exceptional record of compassion and service, Dr. Dahle has been named 2019 Country Doctor of the Year.

Presented by Staff Care, an AMN Healthcare company, the Country Doctor of the Year Award recognizes the spirit, skill, and dedication of America’s rural medical practitioners. The leading temporary physician staffing firm in the United States, Staff Care has presented the national award since 1992 to exemplary physicians practicing in communities of 30,000 or less.

“Dr. Dahle is more than an outstanding primary care physician,” said Jeff Decker, President of Staff Care, “he is one of the pillars on which his community stands. The people, the health system, and the economy of his region simply could not do without him.”

Raised on a potato farm near the California/Oregon border, Daniel Dahle served as a medical corpsman in Vietnam before earning a Ph.D. in radiation biology and a medical degree at the University of Rochester in New York. In 1985, he elected to return to his home region and began practicing in Bieber, California, a frontier town of 300 people located in an isolated section of northeastern California, where he has continued to practice for 33 years.

The sole primary care physician in Bieber, Dr. Dahle is on staff at Big Valley Health Center, a Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC) that sees all patients, regardless of ability to pay. He draws patients from a service area that extends over 7,500 square miles, larger than Rhode Island, Delaware, Connecticut, Hawaii and New Jersey, and to a large extent has been personally responsible for maintaining health services in the region.

Dr. Dahle visiting a patient

In addition to seeing patients at the health center, Dr. Dahle drives 25 miles one way almost every day to see inpatients at Mayers Memorial Hospital in the town of Fall River Mills, where he also covers the emergency department and cares for long-term patients at the hospital’s nursing home. Over half the hospital’s inpatients are admitted by Dr. Dahle, and his presence in the community has been vital to the hospital’s continued viability.

“As a rural hospital goes, so goes the community,” Decker said. “Few people want to stay in or move to a place where there are no healthcare facilities. By supporting the local hospital, Dr. Dahle has done more than keep patients alive – he has kept the community alive.”

Dr. Dahle has delivered over 1,000 babies in his career, often under trying circumstances. Many of the residents in the local valleys, including much of the student body at Bieber’s high school where Dr. Dahle coached track for 25 years, were delivered by Dr. Dahle. His skills as a diagnostician are legendary, as one particularly telling incident illustrates. When a long-term patient and co-worker presented with pain and mental confusion, Dr. Dahle correctly diagnosed herpes encephalitis, despite encountering this rare condition only one previous time in approximately 350,000 patient encounters. The condition is commonly fatal, but by rushing the patient to a tertiary care center hours away and insisting on proper treatment, Dr. Dahle is credited with saving her life.

Not all of the duties that fall to a frontier doctor are strictly clinical. In one instance, Dr. Dahle was present when a knife wielding assailant attacked the local sheriff. Dr. Dahle was able to subdue the man with a forearm shiver. Most of his activities, however, are much more benign. One patient describes how Dr. Dahle was able to provide her dying husband with a last wish, personally escorting him on a scuba diving trip to Hawaii, while another relates how Dr. Dahle revived her newborn when the infant was not breathing. Virtually all of the town’s residents (including Clint Eastwood himself, who has a ranch in the area) have been positively impacted by him in one way or another.

Now aged 70 and contemplating retirement, Dr. Dahle has made educating future care givers part of his mission.   Each year he provides training to medical residents from the University of California, Davis as well as students from the physician assistant program at the University of Iowa. He is well known for sharing his “zebras” with students, medical slang for patients whose maladies are masked or otherwise difficult to diagnose.   Dr. Dahle is hoping to pass the torch on to a husband and wife duo who will soon be completing their medical training and who Dr. Dahle has been recruiting since the couple was in medical school.   Though he has seen rural practice evolve during his tenure, Dr. Dahle believes the essence remains the same.

“Much has changed in 30 years,” said Dr. Dahle, “but patients still respond to someone who really knows them and to someone who really cares.”

As the 2019 Country Doctor of the Year, Dr. Dahle will be able to enjoy two weeks of time off, as Staff Care will provide a temporary physician to fill in for him at no charge, a service valued at approximately $10,000. He also will receive the award’s signature plaque featuring a country doctor making his rounds on a horse and buggy, an engraved stethoscope, and a monogrammed lab coat. Additional information about the Country Doctor of the Year Award can be found at www.countrydoctoraward.com.

About Staff Care and AMN Healthcare
Staff Care is the nation’s leading temporary physician staffing firm and is a company of AMN Healthcare (NYSE: AMN) the largest healthcare workforce solutions company in the United States . For more information, visit www.staffcare.com or www.amnhealthcare.com.

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Pit River Health Opening Outreach Center in Alturas

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Pit River Health Service, Inc. (PRHS) will be holding a Grand Opening for a new behavioral health and outreach center in Alturas on Monday, November 26 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. The public is invited to attend. Refreshments will be served. For more information call Denise 335-5090.

Pit River Health Service, Inc.(PRHS) is a non-profit ambulatory health clinic established in 1979. The purpose of PRHS is to serve the community with a primary focus on the Native American population. PRHS offers medical, dental, and behavioral health services, as well as providing transportation, outreach, and senior nutrition services.

PRHS has two clinics, one is located at the base of the Burney Mountain in Burney and the other is located on the Pit River Tribal reservation in Alturas. The clinics are open to Native and non-Native patients and accept Medi-Cal, Partnership, Medicare, and most private insurances.

PRHS mission statement is:

“To provide the highest quality healthcare services to our patients making all possible efforts to raise the standards of healthcare for our tribal members and others we serve”

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“Christmas in November” benefits Happy Valley Women & Children’s Center

Mother and child testimony

Approximately 45 people attended a “Christmas in November” program at the Word of Life Assembly of God Church (WOLA)in Burney on Saturday, November 10 to support Happy Valley Women & Children’s Center in Anderson.

Happy Valley Women & Children’s Center is a part of Sacramento Valley Teen Challenge, a branch of Adult & Teen Challenge, a worldwide network of Christian faith-based corporations intended to help teenagers, adults, and families with problems such as substance abuse or self-destructive behavior.

Christmas in November

Eight churches from the Assemblies of God Mt. Shasta Section of the Northern California Nevada District participated in Saturday’s gathering at WOLA . $50 gift certificates were given for 23 women and gifts were given to 6 children. Each child received a present purchased specially for them.

The event included fellowship, testimonies from women participating in the Happy Valley program, and lunch. Anna’s Country Kitchen donated beef enchiladas to provide a delicious main course.

WOLA Church Secretary Kathy Newton said, “It was such a joyful experience to see the delight on the kids faces and to share a meal and get to know some of the women from Teen Challenge whose lives are really being changed!”

Teen Challenge traces its roots to the work of David Wilkerson with New York City teens in the late 1950’s. Wilkerson founded Teen Challenge in 1960. In 1962, he published his influential book, The Cross and the Switchblade.

Over the years the program expanded nationally and then internationally. It also expanded its work to include families and adults. In 2017, the organization officially changed its name to Adult & Teen Challenge to acknowledge that the organization works with both teenagers and adults in its addiction treatment centers.

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County officials encourage attention to air quality due to wildfire smoke

From  Shasta County Air Quality Management District:SHASTA COUNTY

It’s important residents take the appropriate measures to protect their health and lungs as wildfire smoke from the Camp Fire is entering Shasta County due to decreased northerly winds.

Officials from the Shasta County Air Quality Management District (AQMD) and Health and Human Services Agency encourage the public to check air quality levels when making daily plans. Conditions can change quickly and can also vary in different areas of the county based on elevation, topography and wind direction. These changing conditions will continue until the fires are under control, making the habit of checking air quality a practice that should be done frequently.

Based on current weather patterns, particulate matter levels within low lying areas on the eastern side of the Sacramento Valley and Anderson have reached UNHEALTHY for SENSITIVE GROUPS (AQI 101-150 range). Smoke is expected to be worse in the early morning hours, then improve in the afternoon as northerly winds materialize. This pattern is expected to remain in place for several days.

For other areas in Shasta County, particulate matter readings are predicted to be anywhere on the Air Quality Index from GOOD (AQI 0-50), MODERATE (AQI 51-100 range), UNHEALTHY for SENSITIVE GROUPS (AQI 101-150 range), and UNHEALTHY (AQI 151 to 200 range). All members of the public, especially those with respiratory or heart disease, the elderly, pregnant women, and children should remain alert. If necessary, reduce or avoid all outdoor exertion when wildfire smoke is present. When levels are not favorable, everyone else should limit prolonged exertion in areas of noticeable smoke accumulation. Individuals wishing to minimize their exposure should:
1) Limit exercise and outdoor activities.
2) Remain indoors with the windows and doors closed.
3)Turn on an air conditioner with a recirculation setting. (such as in a vehicle)

The AQI readings from the fixed monitor are updated hourly and are available at the following website: www.co.shasta.ca.us/index/drm_index/aq_index/aq_map.aspxAdditionally, the air district has deployed experimental particulate matter (smoke) sensors throughout Shasta County. These sensors are not official monitors but can be used to help gauge smoke levels in particular locations. When accessing this data, it is advisable to switch the Map Data Layer dialogue box in the lower left hand corner from “None” to “AQ and U”. This will apply a correction factor that will make the readings relate more closely to the official air quality data. They can be accessed at: For additional information and updates, you may visit the Air Quality Management District Wildfire Smoke Webpage at: https://www.co.shasta.ca.us/index/drm_index/aq_index/aq_wildfire.aspx or call 225-5674.

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Local civic groups provide tricycle for Johnson Park resident

Bill Campbell and Lisa Barry presented Johnson Park resident Shiree Hardman with a tricycle as part of “2 Wheels 2 Mobility,” at the September 13 meeting of Rotary Club of Burney-Fall River.

Lisa Barry, Community Organizer, Shasta County Health and Human Services and Bill Campbell present Shiree Hardman with a tricycle during a Rotary Club of Burney-Fall River meeting. Photo courtesy of Bill Campbell

“It was like Christmas,” Hardman said, describing her excitement and gratitude.

“2 Wheels 2 Mobility” is a program of the Burney-Fall River Bicycle Association that provides individuals without motorized transportation a refurbished bicycle.

Rotary Club of Burney-Fall River funds the project supplemented with private contributions. Dr. Henry and Fran Patterson donated three helmets and locks.

Hardman desperately needed personal motorized transportation. Her ability to walk long distances was inhibited by several illnesses. Getting to the grocery store was a challenge.

Community Organizer Lisa Barry, who works for Shasta County Health and Human Services, contacted bicycle association president Bill Campbell about Hardman’s situation.

Knowing a tricycle assured Hardman’s stable balance when riding, they attempted to find a used tricycle. After a fruitless search, they purchased a tricycle from project partner Redding Sports, LTD, who generously discounted the cost.

Hardman is the second “2 Wheels 2 Mobility” recipient.

Shasta County Health and Human Services and Burney based Tri-County Community Network help identify and screen applicants. Individuals without personal transportation who are interested in receiving a bicycle should contact either of the Burney-based social service agencies.

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Filed under Burney, Cycling, health, Johnson Park, Rotary Club of Burney-Fall River, Tri-Counties Community Center

Mountain Valleys Burney Health Center Free Health Screening August 18

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Catching the Wellness Wave at the Good Medicine Health Fair

Hundreds of people came to “Catch the Wellness Wave” on Friday July 13 at the Good Medicine Health Fair sponsored by Pit River Health Clinics, Inc. The fair featured more than 60 booths giving out helpful information on a wide array of health issues including physical, mental, dental, financial and community health.

Good Medicine Health Fair

This was the 20th annual Good Medicine Health Fair sponsored by Pit River Health Service, Inc. The fair began at 10 a.m. and lasted until 2 p.m.

Health care professionals from Sacramento, Chico, Redding and throughout the North State came to set up booths and offer information on their programs and services. Topics covered almost every conceivable mental, emotional, and physical health issue from human conception to death.

Pit River Health Clinic Medical team including Kathy Kincel P.A, Cassie Bosworth MA, Dr. Bobbie Underhill, Clinic manager, Leroy Jacoby, Marla Wolfin MA. Angelina Berba MA, Amanda Metzger MA, Yarley Contreres MA, and Lewis Furber FNP

Pit River Health Service had eight booths with information of behavioral health, dental health, blood pressure and hypertension, colon health, immunization, opioid use and addiction, the Zika West Nile Virus, AIC Screening for diabetes, Children’s car seat checks, and other services.

Pit River Health Staff Members

Pit River Health Senior Nutrition

Mountain Valleys Health Clinics and Mayer’s Memorial Hospital District were both represented as was Mercy Medical Center. Partnership HealthPlan of California that oversees Medical was present to inform people about assistance.

Mercy Medical Center

Shasta County Health and Human Services had eight booths dealing with childhood lead poisoning prevention, impaired driving, pedestrian safety, tobacco education, outreach, suicide prevention, and maternal, child and adoleescent health.

Lourdes from HHSA

Circle of Friends, a wellness program of Hill Valley Clinic funded by the Mental Health Services Act also had a booth. Stand Against Stigma, also funded by MHSA had a booth inside.

Circle of Friends

Far Northern Regional Center had helpful information about services for people with disabilities. Tegerstangs Orthotics and Prosthetics presented and array of their products. Tri Counties Bank was present to promote financial health,

Numerous Native American organizations were represented including California Indian Manpower Consortium Inc., The California Rural Indian Health Board, Indian Child Welfare Act – Pit River Tribe, Indigenous Prayer Runners, Local Indians for Education, Native American Training and Technical Assistance, and the California Tribal TANF Partnership. In addition there were several booths featuring Native American jewelry, crafts, and pine nuts.

Promoting healthy lifesyle for Native American Youth

Women’s health issues were addressed by the Women’s Healthcare Association of Redding, Every Woman Counts, Women’s Health Specialists, and NorCal Think Pink.

NorCal Think Pink

For seniors, Health Insurance Counseling and Advocacy Program (HICAP) was present to provide health insurance counseling. Eagle Lake Village Senior Living was there. Mayers Intermountain Hospice had a booth to help families cope with the issues of terminal illness and grief.

Rising Sun Fitness Cliub

Healthy Shasta was present to promote healthy lifestyle choices, and Rising Sun Fitness came to feature fitness.

Fred Gideon and Susann Chism from American Red Cross

The Red Cross, Burney Fire Protection District, and US Forest Service all had booths to explain programs for safety, fire protection, and emergency response. The Burney Mosquito Abatement District was there. There was also a booth for California Telephone Access Programs offering a variety of phones for people with special needs.

Event SNIPP came to promote animal health.

To complement the array of heath service professionals, government agencies, and business the Pit River Health Clinic provided a wonderful lunch for everyone who attended.

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