Category Archives: Johnson Park

Trouble at Ogiba’s Restaurant

Richard Koras and Andrea Ogiba are a hard-working young couple pursuing a dream. On November 21 they opened a diner and bakery in Johnson Park where the Frosty’s used to be. They named it Ogiba’s after Andrea’s family name.

Andrea Ogiba pursuing a dream

“My dad, Andrew Ogiba was the start of my inspiration for loving to bake. When he passed away my Nana Pat helped expand the horizon. They are a big part of all of this.”

Richard, soon to turn 30, and Andrea, 25, were married in April. They have two children, Andrew, 5, and Natalia, 2. Richard is a former Marine. He was stationed at Camp Pendleton where he worked as a Avionics Technician doing electrical work on the Huey and Cobra AH1-W and UH1-N helicopters. Both Richard and Andrea are seeking to further their education. Andrea is pursuing online studies with Escoffier School of Culinary Arts to receive a pastry certificate. Richard is working toward a degree in computer information systems. Richard is also working three days a week at Ray’s market.

The couple’s goals for the restaurant are to “support our family, give back to the community, and expand.” Currently the restaurant is open from 4 a.m. to 2 p.m. In the future they hope to serve dinner also.

The couple worked hard for six months to prepare the building for their opening. Beginning in June, they replaced the water main, painted the walls, installed tiling in the floor, put in new sinks, improved fire prevention, repaired gas leaks and did a lot of cleaning. They had hoped to open by August 1, but completing the work and going through the regulatory process prolonged the opening till late November.

Two weeks before opening someone stole Andrea’s cell phone. Shortly after, one panel of the to-go window was broken. The perpetrator did not climb through the window but reached through and grabbed some valves off of the counter. Ogiba suspects that the thief was hoping to steal some tools but couldn’t get in because of the jagged broken glass.

After the business opened, word began to spread that there was a new restaurant and bakery in the area. Business began to pick up.

Ogiba said, “People were excited and eager to try the food. The response was good.  Sometimes it is breakfast and sometime it is lunch, But the fresh baked goods always sell out. The demand for baked goods is more that my two hands can handle. I do all the baking and no one else knows my recipes.”

Then in the wee hours of the morning of Monday, December 17, a thief removed the plastic covering from the to-go window and stole $200 worth of bacon, plus five pounds of sausage, and a loaf of banana bread. Richard recovered the window and reinforced it with boarding.

Inside view of broken window

That did not deter the thief however. The next night he struck again forcing the board back and shattering the other panel of glass so that he could slide the window open and climb in again. This time he stole shredded cheese, bacon bits, Crisco, three more loaves of banana bread, and some Pam. Then he got out through the back door.

Outside view of Broken window

“It was as though he had a grocery list, and he wanted more banana bread. He had to search for it because I had hidden it but he found it.” said Andrea.

She was particularly aggravated that the crook had stolen the Crisco because it was her son Andrew’s fifth birthday and she needed it to prepare the cake.

Richard and Andrea come in every evening to prepare and bake for the next morning. They work through the evening into the night. Then they go home to rest and return the next morning at 3:30 to open up. They estimate that the thief comes between 1:30 a.m. when the last patrol passes through Johnson Park and the time of their return. Ogiba estimates that the combined cost for repair to the window and the stolen goods is over $500.

The response of the people living in the community to the burglaries has been overwhelmingly supportive.

“People want to help. They are angry that this has happened. They are afraid that we may close the business and leave,” Ogiba said.

Many have come to express their support and desire to help. The incidents have been reported to the Sheriff’s Department.

The couple remains firm in their determination to succeed.

Andrea declared, “This is something that I’ve dreamed about for a long time. We’re not going to let it get taken away so easily. We’re not going anywhere!”

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Johnson Park

F Troop Santa delivers Christmas toys to Intermountain children

Riding through the chilly winter fog, United Bikers of Northern California “F Troop” delivered Christmas toys to more than one hundred children in low income housing in the Intermountain Area on Saturday morning December 15.

Lots of Kids happy to meet Santa

The bikers met at Greg Trotter’s house at 9:30 a.m. to pack vehicles with toys for boys and girls. F Troop raised funds to purchase toys at their giant annual yard sale during the summer. Additional toys were gathered by the “Stuff the Ambulance” program sponsored by Mayers Memorial Hospital.

Santa and F Troop deliver Christmas toys

The club delivered toys to apartments on Superior Avenue and Burney Villa in Burney, Rainbow’s End Trailer Park in Johnson Park, Cedarwood apartments in Fall River Mills, Mayer’s Memorial Hospital, and McArthur Trailer Park.

Hunter and Chloe with Santa

At each stop, children and their parents streamed out of their homes to greet Santa and receive presents.

A thoughtful moment with Santa

Giving and receiivng brings Christmas joy

F Troop is the local affiliate of United Bikers of Northern California a non-profit tax exempt charitable organization dedicated to the freedom and safety of all motorcyclists.  Part of F Troop’s motto is “riding to live and living to give.”

F Troop President Greg Trotter with grateful kids

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Burney, F Troop, Fall River Mills, Johnson Park, Mayers Memorial Hospital, McArthur, Motorcycles

Local civic groups provide tricycle for Johnson Park resident

Bill Campbell and Lisa Barry presented Johnson Park resident Shiree Hardman with a tricycle as part of “2 Wheels 2 Mobility,” at the September 13 meeting of Rotary Club of Burney-Fall River.

Lisa Barry, Community Organizer, Shasta County Health and Human Services and Bill Campbell present Shiree Hardman with a tricycle during a Rotary Club of Burney-Fall River meeting. Photo courtesy of Bill Campbell

“It was like Christmas,” Hardman said, describing her excitement and gratitude.

“2 Wheels 2 Mobility” is a program of the Burney-Fall River Bicycle Association that provides individuals without motorized transportation a refurbished bicycle.

Rotary Club of Burney-Fall River funds the project supplemented with private contributions. Dr. Henry and Fran Patterson donated three helmets and locks.

Hardman desperately needed personal motorized transportation. Her ability to walk long distances was inhibited by several illnesses. Getting to the grocery store was a challenge.

Community Organizer Lisa Barry, who works for Shasta County Health and Human Services, contacted bicycle association president Bill Campbell about Hardman’s situation.

Knowing a tricycle assured Hardman’s stable balance when riding, they attempted to find a used tricycle. After a fruitless search, they purchased a tricycle from project partner Redding Sports, LTD, who generously discounted the cost.

Hardman is the second “2 Wheels 2 Mobility” recipient.

Shasta County Health and Human Services and Burney based Tri-County Community Network help identify and screen applicants. Individuals without personal transportation who are interested in receiving a bicycle should contact either of the Burney-based social service agencies.

Leave a comment

Filed under Burney, Cycling, health, Johnson Park, Rotary Club of Burney-Fall River, Tri-Counties Community Center

Stuff the Ambulance Toy Drive donates toys to F Troop for delivery to kids

On the evening of December 12, members of F Troop rode to Meyers Memorial Hospital to pick up toys that they will deliver to low income children in Burney, Johnson Park, Fall River, and McArthur.

 -

F Troop members Leslie Horney, Dee Covert, Rex Horney, and Tim Covert pick up toys from Mayers Memorial Stuff the Ambulance – photo courtesy of Leslie Horney

The toys were donated as part of the Stuff the Ambulance Toy Drive sponsored by Meyers Memorial Hospital. Collection of toys, “stuffing the ambulance,” took place at seven locations throughout the Intermountain area. This is the third year that the program has been in place.

F Troop with toys from Stuff The Ambulance

In addition to the toys from Stuff the Ambulance, F Troop has purchased more than $2000 worth of toys. The money for the toys was raised at F Troop’s annual yard sale held in Burney during the summer. Yard sale items are donated by people in the community for the project. All together the project gives out quality new toys to more than 125 children of families living in low income housing in the Intermountain Area. The club also buys new batteries for all the battery operated toys.

F Troop is the Burney affiliate of United Bikers of Northern California. They began giving out toys for kids 17 years ago when Tom Tindel was president of the club. The first year they gave out 30 Christmas stockings stuffed with toys and goodies in the Safeway parking lot. The program has grown every year since. Tom Miller succeeded Tindel as President and helped organize the program for three years.

Three years ago, under the leadership of President Greg Trotter, they began the summer yard sale so the community could be more involved. Each year, on a Saturday before Christmas, they give out the toys on a Christmas Toy Run led by Santa on a motorcycle. This year’s run will be Saturday December 16. Some of the bikers dress up as elves to help Santa deliver the toys.

See also

F Troop Christmas Toy Run

F Troop hosts run for Northern California bikers

Leave a comment

Filed under Burney, Fall River Mills, Johnson Park, Mayers Memorial Hospital, McArthur, Motorcycles, youth

Community Meeting on Crime and Homelessness

The Veterans Hall was full on July 11, as hundreds turned out for the community meeting organized by Jen Luck and Mary Rickert. People came not only from Burney but also from Fall River Valley and Montgomery Creek in hope of finding positive solutions to problems of crime and the increase of homelessness in the area.

Jen Luck, Office Manager of the Burney Chamber of Commerce, began the meeting promptly at 6 p.m. and introduced County Supervisor Mary Rickert.

Community meeting on crime and homelessness

Supervisor Rickert gave brief opening remarks. She has been attending similar town meetings throughout our district in the county. She said that the subject is complex and that crime has deep underlying root causes. She said that where there has been the most success dealing with the problem is when people in the community work together and form local groups such as Neighborhood Watch where they monitor their neighborhood and address issues on the local level as they arise.

Mary Rickert addresses the audience

She also mentioned a community-building program called Meet The Neighbors. Meet the Neighbors does not focus only on crime. It’s mission is to give “you and your neighbors powerful tools to communicate, meet, organize, get important local stuff done…”

After sharing her opening remarks, members of the panel introduced themselves. Officials attending included Shasta County Sheriff Tom Bosenko, Lieutenant Tyler Thompson from the Burney Sheriff’s station, Lieutenant Scott Frederick from California Highway Patrol, Nick Truax from Cal Fire, Monte Keady from Burney Fire Protection District, and Rod Armstrong from the Burney Citizen Volunteer Patrol.

The first and main speaker of the evening was Sheriff Bosenko. He spoke for a half hour about the effect of several public safety bills and propositions.  Because the US Supreme Court mandated a reduction in California’s overcrowded prisons, Assembly Bill 109 on Public Safety Realignment was passed in 2011. According to Bosenko, this resulted in the release of 30,000 inmates.

In addition, Proposition 47 reduced penalties for certain crimes and Proposition 57 altered sentencing rules. Many crimes have been reduced from felonies to misdemeanors. As the state prison population has decreased the county jails have filled up. With shorter sentences, recidivism has increased.

Sherriff Tom Bosenko addresses the crowd

Bosenko said that the problems have been compounded by limited resources to maintain facilities and manpower. Officers have to prioritize calls and they are limited as to what they can do by state regulation.

At the same time, Sheriff Bosenko cited statistics indicating that crime is down overall for the Burney, Fall River, and Montgomery Creek area.

He said that panhandling is not against the law, but that if business owners post “no soliciting” or “no trespassing” signs then they can be asked to move on or be prosecuted for trespassing if they don’t comply.

Concerning homelessness, Bosenko said, “All homeless people are not criminals and all criminals are not homeless.”

If people are camped or squatting on private land, they can not be removed unless it is posted “No trespassing.”

He then opened the floor to questions, of which there were many.

Generally speaking the questions and comments fell into three categories: 1) people who wanted to know what the Sheriff’s Department and other law enforcement could do to deal with burglaries, squatting, trash in the woods. etc. 2) People asking what they themselves could do, and 3) people recounting personal stories of problems they had encountered with theft, unruly, or indecent behavior.

One man said, “I came here to find out what you can do for me!”

Another said, “Are you telling us that Sacramento has handcuffed you?” To which Bosenko answered in the affirmative.

There was some advice in regard to burglary and suspicious behavior concerning getting license plate numbers and descriptions, but a lot of the responses concerned regulations and lack of manpower and resources that impeded action.

Cal Fire and Burney Fire Department advised people to notify them if there were any fires in the woods.

The representative from CHP said that their work was mainly in the area of traffic law enforcement and safety, but that they and other law enforcement agencies were also there to back up and work together with local law enforcement.

Monte Keady said that while we are facing current problems we should also be taking action that would address underlying issues and ensure a better future such as mentoring our youth.

When people asked what they could do generally, they were advised to communicate with appropriate law enforcement officers. If violations occurred on US Forest Service Land, people should contact the Forest Service and they would take action. If there were encampments or trash on private land, people should notify the landowners such as Sierra Pacific, PG&E, or United Fruit Growers.

The most sound advice seemed to be that of Mary Rickert to form community associations and work together with their neighbors in cooperation with local public services.

Someone asked about citizen’s arrests. Bosenko said that people could make arrests but they needed to be careful in apprehending people because they may be on drugs, armed or dangerous. Also, if the charges were not successfully prosecuted they could be sued for false arrest.

One lady who had military experience asked about carrying a gun. Bosenko advised her that she had a right for her and her family to walk in public areas and trails, and if they had a concealed weapons permit and felt that there was a need to protect themselves they could carry a weapon.

There were also questions and discussions regarding the Windmill Fund and the Fire Protection Tax. Cal Fire said that most of the money spent from the tax in Shasta County had been to build the fire break near Burney after the fire two years ago.

The room was hot and many left early but a lot of people stayed until the end.

When one attendee said that he felt that more town meetings were necessary not only on these issues but on other issues such as the condition of the parks in Burney, Mary Rickert committed that she would be willing to come up and host a town meeting once a month.

Rod Armstrong from Burney Citizen Patrol

One bright spot towards the end was when a request was made for specific activities volunteers could be involved in, Rickert asked Rod Armstrong from the Citizens Patrol to speak. He described the activities of the patrol and how people could get involved. Several people signed up as volunteers after the meeting. More volunteers are still needed.

There was broad representation of the meeting. Not only were many business people, homeowners and concerned parents present, but also several ministers who would like to address these problems. Tri Counties Community Network was present. Representatives of Circle of Friends also attended. They have had considerable success helping some people to get out of homelessness, and many others overcome substance abuse and addiction.

The meeting ended after 8 p.m. Many stayed until 8:45 to talk with officials and each other.

The next day, Jen Luck said that she is already working on ideas for future meetings. She has researched and joined Meet the Neighbors and hopes that others will do so to create local community groups dedicated to community improvement and practical problem solving.

Since the meeting there has been a lot of conversation on social media, amongst friends, family and neighbors and in several meetings. Some are frustrated but others are determined to find constructive ways to address the situation.

See Wikipedia article on Neighborhood Watch

2 Comments

Filed under Burney, Chamber of Commerce, Fall River Mills, Johnson Park, Montgomery Creek

United Pentecostal Church yard sale and clothing give-away April 15

Notice from United Pentecostal Church in Johnson Park:

“The United Pentacostal Church in Johnson Park thanks the community, the awesome gals at AT&T, and McKenzies Thrift Shop for their generous contributions of clothing and food for the homeless outreach program.

The church is overflowing and will have a giant give-away of clothes to those in need as well as a yard sale to raise money for the youth program. It will be held April 15th from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. outside the church unless the rain forces us indoors. There will be a bounce house, an antique piano and organ for sale as well as many more items.

We hope to see you there.”

For more information call Jeanne Lindler 335-4770

Leave a comment

Filed under Churches, Johnson Park, youth

Hundreds come out for candlelight memorial for Dave Wicks

More than 150 people came out for a candlelight memorial for Dave Wicks on Wednesday evening at Burney High School.

Dave Wicks Candlelight Memorial

Dave Wicks Candlelight Memorial

Kyle Cantrell helped to organize and oversee the event. Burney Volunteer Fire Department and Shasta County Sherriff’s Department personnel attended and businesses in town left their lights on for the evening to show their love and support for Dave and his family

dave-wicks-candlelight-memorial

Mr. Cantrell brought 300 candles for people to light. People lit all of the candles and placed them in a cleared area. Some people placed candles spelling out Dave’s name with a heart.

dave-wicks-candlelight-memorial3

After all of the candles were lit, Cantrell opened up the microphone for anyone to share. The first to do so was a lifetime friend of Dave’s who had known him as a lad in Reno, had played music with him in the band Razormade, and had been present when Dave first met his wife Sonja. He said that he had never seen Dave happier than while he was living in this area with Sonja. He and Sonja shared the same joyful giving spirit.

Longtime friend John Kirk who plated with Dave in Razormade shares aa testimony about Dave

Longtime friend John Kirk who played with Dave in Razormade shares a testimony

Afterwards, many came forward to share how Dave’s goodness had touched their lives. Several shared how he had befriended them through his friendly warm-heartedness while working at the Shell Station.

A heartfelt testimony to Dave's kindness

A heartfelt testimony to Dave’s kindness

Others talked of how they had been uplifted by his music. One of his coworkers at the gas station spoke of Dave’s faith. Dave loved God and he loved people. He was kind to everyone.

A coworker talks about how wonderful it was working with Dave

A coworker talks about how wonderful it was working with Dave

Most of those who spoke shed tears as they testified to his acts of kindness. Dave was much-loved and will be dearly missed. At the end of the memorial everyone sang Dave’s name together.

There will be a memorial service for Dave at Burney High School on January 21.

To view videos of the memorial see: Videos of Candlelight Memorial for Dave Wicks Wednesday, December 28, 2016

 

1 Comment

Filed under Burney, Johnson Park