Category Archives: Mental Health

Intermountain Teens host healing drum circle at Hill Valley Clinic

More than 40 people gathered at the Hill Country Clinic on Wednesday evening November 14 to participate in a healing drum circle sponsored by the Intermountain Teen Center.

Intermountain Teen Center Healing Drum Circle

The teens invited everyone in community and drew drummers and shakers ranging in age from a young toddler to senior citizens.

This young fellow tried many different instruments

Circle of Friends in Burney brought a bus load and two vans and people came from Round Mountain, Montgomery Creek, and Big Bend. There were lots of drums, shakers, clacking sticks and other rhythm instruments so that everyone was able to participate.

Teen Center Program Coordinator Theresa Callahan welcomed everybody and then introduced experienced drummer Verena Compton, who facilitated the drum circle together with her husband Randy.

Verena began with a prayer in both German and English. She advised people that the African djembes were meant to be played with hands only. Then she began a beat and everyone joined in. After a period of time the drumming came to an end and then Verena or Randy began a new beat for another period. And so it was for one hour as people joined in with djembes, bongos, Native American drums, gourds, shakers, and sticks. The drum circle continued for about one hour.

Twin drummers Britney and Sara

Communal drum circles have existed amongst indigenous people around the world for thousands of years. They began becoming popular in the United States during the counterculture movement in the  late 1960’s. Over the years, it has been found that drumming is therapeutic.

In 1991, during testimony before the United States Senate Special Committee on Aging, Grateful Dead drummer Mickey Hart stated:

Typically, people gather to drum in drum “circles” with others from the surrounding community. The drum circle offers equality because there is no head or tail. It includes people of all ages. The main objective is to share rhythm and get in tune with each other and themselves. To form a group consciousness. To entrain and resonate. By entrainment, I mean that a new voice, a collective voice, emerges from the group as they drum together.

In his book “The Healing Power of the Drum”, Robert Lawrence Friedman states:

Some of the psychological applications in which hand drums are being used include assisting veterans to release the emotional pain of post-traumatic stress disorder, releasing the pent-up anger and negative emotions of “at-risk” adolescents, and promoting health in corporate executives through releasing their day-to-day stress, in addition to many other applications.

The Intermountain Teen Center plans to host more drum circles for the community in the future.

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Filed under Circle of Friends, Intermountain Teen Center, Mental Health, youth

InterMountain Teen Centers will host Healing Drum Circle November 14

The InterMountain Teen Centers is hosting a Healing Drum Circle Wednesday, November 14 from 6-7 p.m. in the great room at Hill Country Clinic in Round Mountain.

Drumming is fun, creative, stress-relieving and therapeutic.

In his book “The Healing Power of the Drum”, Robert Lawrence Friedman states:

Some of the psychological applications in which hand drums are being used include assisting veterans to release the emotional pain of post-traumatic stress disorder, releasing the pent-up anger and negative emotions of “at-risk” adolescents, and promoting health in corporate executives through releasing their day-to-day stress, in addition to many other applications.

The healing ability of rhythm is boundless

Mr. Friedman is a corporate trainer, psychotherapist, author, professional speaker, and musician.  He has worked in the area of rhythm-based exercises and their effects on health and wellness for over 30 years. Based upon his work he believes that drumming

… provides those who use it with a link to others. The drum seems to have the capacity to unite all individuals who choose to experience it together. Despite race, religion, color, creed, background, or ideology, all are joined together through this ancient instrument’s calling. The drum, therefore, becomes a vehicle for transporting all who utilize it, across all boundaries, to an experience of wholeness and community.

The  Intermountain Teens Healing Drum Circle will be led by Verena Compton an experienced drummer who has participated in drum circles for many years.

The event is free and open to the public. Experienced and novice drummers alike are welcome. Bring drums and other rhythm instruments if you have them. If you can, bring one to share. If you don’t have a drum but want to learn, come.

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Filed under Intermountain Teen Center, Mental Health, Music, Round Mountain, youth

Circle of Friends 10th Anniversary Celebration September 12

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September 6, 2018 · 6:16 pm

Circle of Friends 10th Anniversary September 12

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Singers and poets celebrate Hope is Alive! at Ol’ Merc Pizza

Scores of people were uplifted and entertained by ten performers at the Hope is Alive! open mic at Ol’ Merc Pizza in McArthur on Friday night May 18.

Chuck Darwin Hepburn and Stu Stoore playing the blues

The evening performances included songs, spoken word, poetry, and stand up comedy. Performers included Alex Colvin, Stu Stoore, Chuck Darwin Hepburn, Kimberly Davis, spoken word artist Angel, a stand-up comedian, Michael Bennett, Phil Dekker, George Whitfield, and a young woman poet who rose from the audience at the end to read.

Kimberly Davis sings a powerful song

Chuck Darwin Hepburn, not only played and sang on the guitar. He also provided innovative improvisation on his saxophone to accompany several other performers. Mr. Hepburn recently moved to Bieber.

Angel doing spoken word

As well as performing a variety of tunes on guitar and ukulele, Stu Stoore also did an excellent job of managing the sound system.

George Whitfield sings Dylan

A poet

Amy Sturgeon explains about Suicide Prevention

Hope is Alive! open mics celebrate the power of the creative arts to uplift, comfort and heal people in times of mental or emotional crisis. The Master of Ceremonies for the evening was Marc Dadigan. The program was sponsored by Stand Against Stigma funded by the Mental Health Services Act. Mid-program, Amy Sturgeon, a community education specialist in suicide prevention gave a short talk. Toward the end of the program Carrie Jo Diamond, director of Stand Against Stigma also spoke about the activities of Intermountain Mental Health Week.

Carrie Jo Diamond from Stand Against Stigma talks about Intermountain Mental Health Week

After the program, several musicians stayed to jam together.

Jammin’ on Saint James Infirmary

For more information about Stand Against Stigma, visit www.standagainststigma.com.

 

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Filed under Hope is Alive!, McArthur, Mental Health

Five free events for Intermountain Mental Health Week

Intermountain Mental Health Week has arrived! Five FREE events that will give residents of Shasta County small towns resources they can use to support someone going through a mental health challenge:

  • Finding Hope in Our Neighbors: A Stand Against Stigma Forum – 6-8 p.m. (reception at 5:30 p.m.), Tuesday, May 15th at the Intermountain Evangelical Free Church in McArthur – Professionals and Brave Faces speakers who have become masters of managing their mental health discuss what communities can do to support those in recovery. Panelists include:
    • Donnell Ewert, Director of Shasta County Health and Human Services
    • Cathy Tillman, MHSA Volunteer Program and Peer Support Coordinator
    • Denise Green, HHSA Peer Support Specialist and Brave Faces Advocate
    • Susan Power, President of NAMI and Brave Faces Advocate
    • David Martinez, Retired firefighter/EMT, retired drug and alcohol counselor, Winnemem Wintu tribal member and Brave Faces Advocate
  • Question, Persuade, Refer (QPR) Suicide Prevention Training – QPR is a research-based training that involves three simple steps. When put into action, these steps can prevent a death by suicide. Trainings will be offered in Shingletown and Burney:
    • Shingletown – 5:30-7:30 p.m., Thursday, May 17th, Black Butte Elementary School Library
    • Burney – 4-5:30 p.m., Friday, May 18th at Circle of Friends in Burne

 

Spoken word artists, rappers, poets and musicians from throughout Shasta County are invited to share performances that celebrate how art helps healing and promotes understanding. Hope Is Alive! Performers should sign in at 5:30 p.m.

  • Becoming Brave Training – 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Saturday, May 19th, Circle of Friends in Burney. Take control of your mental health story with this peer-led training. Based on a national curriculum, this one-day training will cover 3 primary goals:
  1. Evaluating the costs/benefits of disclosing personal experience with mental health conditions.
  2. Developing strategies for safer disclosing.
  3. Crafting one’s story into a meaningful message.

Lunch is provided, there is still time to RSVP! Call 229-8484 or  email cdiamond@co.shasta.ca.us.

Hope to see you there!

With gratitude,

Carrie Jo Diamond
Community Education Specialist
Stand Against Stigma Coordinator
Shasta County Health and Human Services Agency
Office of the Director
2615 Breslauer Way
Redding, CA 96001
Office: (530) 229-8484
Fax: (530) 229-8447

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Suicide Prevention Training May 18 at Circle of Friends

Suicide Prevention Training May 18 at Circle of Friends

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Filed under Burney, Circle of Friends, Mental Health