Category Archives: Montgomery Creek

Community Foundation Grant Opportunity Deadline is June 7th

The Shasta Regional Community Foundation is a resource building organization in Shasta and Siskiyou counties dedicated to promoting philanthropy by connecting people who care with causes that matter. Since 2000, the Community Foundation has awarded over $18,000,000 in grants to area nonprofit organizations.

Artist Kim Solga received a grant to paint a prominent public mural in Dunsmuir celebrating the town’s heritage.

The deadline of June 7th is fast approaching for grant applications for funding from two field of interest funds managed by the Shasta Regional Community Foundation. These opportunities are provided thanks to the efforts and investments made by many generous donors in our region. The Animal Welfare Endowment Fund was established in 2009 to benefit projects that will provide care for animals in Shasta and Siskiyou counties; the Community Arts Endowment Fund was established to support grants to nonprofits, public entities, and individual artists for the creation and presentation of new work in any media in the region. Grant review committee members from the areas served evaluate the proposals and make recommendations for funding.

More details about making donations to or requesting funding from these and other funds are available on the Community Foundation’s website at www.shastarcf.org.

For further information, contact Program Officer, Amanda Hutchings at amanda@shastarcf.org or call 530.244.1219.

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Filed under Art, Burney, Fall River Community Choir, Intermountain Art, MacArthur, Montgomery Creek, Round Mountain

PG&E flying low in Eastern Shasta County to check for drought-stricken trees

REDDING, Calif. – Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) will fly low by helicopter in the mountains of eastern Shasta County on Wednesday and Thursday (Feb. 22 and 23) to check for drought-stricken trees near power lines.

Flights will occur over the communities of Big Bend, Round Mountain, Oak Run, Montgomery Creek and Whitmore.

Residents are advised that the helicopter will fly low – about 200 to 300 feet – along distribution power lines.

PG&E is using a contract helicopter service to fly foresters to check for trees weakened by the drought. This patrol is in addition to the annual patrols PG&E conducts along power lines to identify trees and vegetation in need of pruning and removal. Weakened trees and branches can fall into power lines, leading to outages and even wild land fires.

The drought has weakened and killed many trees and left others susceptible to disease or insects. After the flights, foresters will hike to the trees in question for a closer inspection to verify tree conditions. Once a forester confirms a tree needs to be removed, PG&E will work with the property owner to schedule a contractor to cut the tree.

Consecutive years of drought have taken a toll on trees and even some trees deemed healthy six months ago have since succumbed to the dry conditions.

The U.S. Forest Service recently identified an exponentially growing rate of tree mortality in California. In 2014, 11 million dead trees were identified throughout the state. That number grew to 40 million in 2015 and 102 million in 2016.

While tree mortality is more serious in 10 counties in the southern and central Sierra Nevada region, the Forest Service also identified increasing mortality in the northern part of the state.

Weather permitting, flights will occur between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m.

 

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Filed under Big Bend, Montgomery Creek, PG&E

PG&E Checking in Shasta County for Drought-stricken Trees

The following is a press release from PG&E dated December 5. The initial import of the release is to notify and explain to residents of Round Mountain, Montgomery Creek, and Big Bend the reasons that helicopters would be flying low over their areas on Tuesday, December 7.

The release gives details about the growing number of trees that have died as a result of the drought or are threatened by insects and disease as a result of weakened resistance. After the aerial check, foresters will follow up on foot to inspect trees. Then private landowners will be contacted. Dead or infected trees will need to be trimmed or removed.

Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) will be flying low by helicopter in Shasta County on Tuesday to check for drought-stricken trees near power lines. Flights will occur over Round Mountain, Montgomery Creek and Big Bend.

Residents are advised that the helicopter will fly low – about 200 to 300 feet – along distribution power lines.

PG&E is using a contract helicopter service to fly foresters to check for trees weakened by the drought. This patrol is in addition to the annual patrols PG&E does along power lines to identify trees and vegetation in need of pruning and removal. Weakened trees and branches can fall into power lines, leading to outages and even wild land fires.

The drought has weakened and killed many trees and left others susceptible to disease or insects.  After the flights, foresters will hike to the trees in question for an up-close inspection to verify tree conditions.  Once a forester confirms a tree needs to be removed, PG&E will work with the property owner to schedule a contractor to cut the tree.

Consecutive years of drought have taken a toll on trees and even some trees deemed healthy six months ago have since succumbed to the dry conditions. The U.S. Forest Service recently identified an exponentially growing rate of tree mortality in California.  In 2014, 11 million dead trees were identified throughout the state. That number grew to 40 million in 2015 and 102 million in 2016.

While tree mortality is more serious in 10 counties in the southern and central Sierra Nevada Mountain region, the Forest Service also identified increasing mortality in the northern part of the state.

Weather permitting, all flights will occur between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m.B>>

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Filed under Big Bend, Montgomery Creek, PG&E, Pit River, Round Mountain, Timber and Forestry

Harvest Creek Carnival at Montgomery Creek School

harvest-carnival

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October 19, 2016 · 4:24 pm

Theresa Callahan new Intermountain Teen Center Coordinator

Theresa Callahan is the new Program Coordinator for the Intermountain Teen Center. Ms. Callahan worked for ten years with the McConnell Foundation on internship programs with Shasta Community College and other youth projects. She has led volunteer youth groups at the Center for Spiritual Living in Redding and has organized many outdoor activities for young people.

Theresa Callahan and Jedediah Smith at the Burney Teen Center

Theresa Callahan and Jedediah Smith at the Burney Teen Center

Ms. Callahan will be working with Jedediah Smith who is the Youth Program Manager.  Ms. Callahan will help plan after-school activities at both locations. She will also be responsible for organizing at least one special activity a month and two overnight trips a year.  Monthly activities could include hikes, museum field trips, community events, or concerts. Overnight trips would involve camping, rafting, college field trips, and other worthwhile activities.

Mr. Smith works one-on-one with at-risk teens and their families to provide counseling and other services. Chelsea Sabin, a Coach Coordinator at Circle of Friends, also helps to coordinate activities at the center in Burney.

The Intermountain Teen Center is a youth outreach program of the Hill Country Health and Wellness Center. The afterschool drop-in program works in two locations. In Round Mountain, there is a center behind Hill Country Clinic that is open on Monday, Wednesday and Friday from 3 p.m. to 6.p.m. In Burney, the center is open on Tuesday and Thursday from 3 p.m. to 6.pm at the Circle of Friends office on the corner of Main and Tamarack.

The teen center serves teens ages 13- 17. The center has held a number of classes on cooking and art. They also have a lot of fun activities, including contests, video games, air hockey, a pool table, board games, art, and music.  There are quiet areas to do homework and computers for the young people to use. There is also a music room and a small gym area with workout equipment.

Ms. Callahan said, “I am looking forward to getting to  know everyone and developing new ideas.”

If you would like more information, or if you would like to volunteer or donate supplies call Theresa Callahan or Jed Smith at (530)337-5752, or Chelsea Sabin (for Burney) at 335-4222.

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Filed under Burney, Intermountain Teen Center, Montgomery Creek, Round Mountain, youth

Great country music at Billy’s Roadside Café

The Intermountain area was treated to some stellar country music last Saturday night at Billy’s Roadside Café in Montgomery Creek.

Great country music at Billy's Roadside Cafe

Great country music at Billy’s Roadside Cafe

Rising star Jamie Pineda opened the show, soulfully singing a variety of classic and contemporary country tunes.

Jamie Pineda

In 2013, Jamie was a top contender in The X Factor.

She also sang with Merle Haggard’s band until his recent demise in April 2016. She is now currently playing and recording with some of the members of Haggard’s band.

Jamie is originally from Fall River Mills and now lives in the Burney area with her husband Juan Venegas and her their baby daughter. Her manager is Loren Kemper who became Haggard’s sound man in 2002. Kemper also provided the sound for Saturday evening’s event.

Loren Kemper and Doug Colosio

Loren Kemper and Doug Colosio

The headliner for the evening was The Lone Strangers featuring Doug Colosio.

The Lone Strangers

The Lone Strangers

Colosio is originally from Redding. He went to Nashville to pursue his dream in country music and began playing with Merle Haggard in 1998. During his career with Haggard he played keyboards and bass.

Colosio co-wrote several songs with Haggard and toward the end of Haggard’s sang the opening songs in several of Haggard’s shows.

As well as being a consummate musician, Colosio has a distinctive voice that combines elements of country and jazz.  He has a smooth style that that moves easily from ballad to boogie. Colosio now lives in Redding.

Robert Cummings, the owner of Billy’s Roadside Café said he wants to have quality bands  on a regular basis. Heavy Dose of Blues have played there several times.

On May 20, he hosted the Hope is Alive 6 open mike. Cummings said he felt really good about that event because he likes to put on events that are positive for the community.

Saturday night’s show was certainly positive and delightful!

 

 

 

 

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Filed under Montgomery Creek, Music

Hope is Alive! 6 showcases incredible talent

On Friday evening May 20, Stand Against Stigma hosted a marvelous Hope is Alive! 6 open mike at Billy’s Roadside Café (formerly the Station Café) in Montgomery Creek. The place was packed. Standing room only! Organizer Marc Dadigan opened the event at 6 p.m. and introduced the emcee for the evening, Amanda Flowers Peterson.

Marc Dadigan and Amanda Flowers Peterson

Marc Dadigan and Amanda Flowers Peterson

Amanda opened the performances with a wonderful spoken word piece and then introduced a duet by Kimberly Davis  and Michael Bennett.

Kimberly Davis and Michael Bennet sing a Duet

Kimberly Davis and Michael Bennett sing a duet

Next, Billy Riggins (Chill Bill) shared some testimony and performed some of his wonderful music.

Chill Bill

Chill Bill

Following Chill Bill, Stu Stoore, a talented sing-songwriter from McArthur shared a lovely ballad and a rousing rendition of “She’ll Be Comin’ Round the Mountain.”

Singer-Songwriter Stu Stoore

Singer-Songwriter Stu Stoore

Sarah Clark, a dancer, singer and poet, recited the “Cremation of Sammy McGee” by Robert Service.

Sarah Clark recites the Cremation of Sammy McGee

Sarah Clark recites the Cremation of Sammy McGee

Next another talented folksinger, Rodney performed.

Rodney Manning

Rodney Manning

This was followed by two songs by a very talented singer who is also a social activist named Mauro.

Mauro

Mauro

The next performer was Drake Smith. Drake’s soulful singing and dancing are always a show-stopper. After a moving song, Drake treated us an astounding performance of dance.

As you can see Drake is world class!

I was next on the list. I had planned to do a song and a short poem. Shortly before getting up Marc asked me to share a story that I had related to him.

The purpose of these open mics is to promote healing through creativity. Stand Against Stigma assists people who are facing various challenges to gain hope and help by offering resources for them to heal and recover. So, when I was introduced, I recounted a story that illustrated how important sharing was. If you recognize the signs that a person is at risk for suicide or going through some crisis, it is many times helpful to address it. People are often liberated from the burden of their suffering just by getting things off their chest. One can help by simply being a sympathetic and compassionate listener. Loneliness and isolation are at the root of many of our problems.

After sharing briefly, I then did my poem and my song.

By the way, my wife Linda took the photos and recorded most of the videos in this article.

After I finished, we were treated to a performance of Native American Rap by Pit Crew, the dynamic duo of Billy Riggins and Louis Gustafsen.

Pit Crew

Pit Crew

… and then a poignant poem accented by beautiful singing performed by Jamieson Brown.

Jamieson Brown performs a beautiful poem

Jamieson Brown performs a beautiful poem

Next, Kimberly returned to the stage to perform two songs from the Broadway musical “Tuck Everlasting.”

Kimberly Michelle Davis sings 2 songs from a Broadway show

Kimberly Michelle Davis sings 2 songs from a Broadway show

We were nearing the end of the program. However, inspired by the performances, two more people signed up. Jordyn Paiell came up to the mic and shared a poignant testimony of how she overcame a difficult situation…

Jordyn Paiell

Jordyn Paiell

… and then Diane Lahey sang a song inviting everyone to join in.

Diane Lahey Singing a song

Diane Lahey singing a song

Thus ended the individual performances. As you can see there was a wide diversity of talent. It’s hard to believe that the entire program took just over 2 hours. It all flowed smoothly because Amanda was a great emcee and the program limited each act to 8 minutes.

Moreover, the atmosphere was uplifting and the environment was convivial. It was great to see so many old friends, some of whom I hadn’t seen in quite awhile.

But still the evening was not finished. Robert, the owner of the restaurant was kind enough to welcome the musicians to stay longer and jam together. And so began a wonderful jam session.

Closing Jam

Closing Jam

It began with Steve Stoore doing a song with Pit Crew.

Leroy and Michele from Heavy Dose of Blues were there. Leroy got out his harps and Michele brought in her box drum and a lively session ensued. Here are a couple of videos capturing some of the songs.

What can I say? Hope is Alive in the Intermountain area.

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Filed under Entertainment, Montgomery Creek