Category Archives: Pit River Tribe

Catching the Wellness Wave at the Good Medicine Health Fair

Hundreds of people came to “Catch the Wellness Wave” on Friday July 13 at the Good Medicine Health Fair sponsored by Pit River Health Clinics, Inc. The fair featured more than 60 booths giving out helpful information on a wide array of health issues including physical, mental, dental, financial and community health.

Good Medicine Health Fair

This was the 20th annual Good Medicine Health Fair sponsored by Pit River Health Service, Inc. The fair began at 10 a.m. and lasted until 2 p.m.

Health care professionals from Sacramento, Chico, Redding and throughout the North State came to set up booths and offer information on their programs and services. Topics covered almost every conceivable mental, emotional, and physical health issue from human conception to death.

Pit River Health Clinic Medical team including Kathy Kincel P.A, Cassie Bosworth MA, Dr. Bobbie Underhill, Clinic manager, Leroy Jacoby, Marla Wolfin MA. Angelina Berba MA, Amanda Metzger MA, Yarley Contreres MA, and Lewis Furber FNP

Pit River Health Service had eight booths with information of behavioral health, dental health, blood pressure and hypertension, colon health, immunization, opioid use and addiction, the Zika West Nile Virus, AIC Screening for diabetes, Children’s car seat checks, and other services.

Pit River Health Staff Members

Pit River Health Senior Nutrition

Mountain Valleys Health Clinics and Mayer’s Memorial Hospital District were both represented as was Mercy Medical Center. Partnership HealthPlan of California that oversees Medical was present to inform people about assistance.

Mercy Medical Center

Shasta County Health and Human Services had eight booths dealing with childhood lead poisoning prevention, impaired driving, pedestrian safety, tobacco education, outreach, suicide prevention, and maternal, child and adoleescent health.

Lourdes from HHSA

Circle of Friends, a wellness program of Hill Valley Clinic funded by the Mental Health Services Act also had a booth. Stand Against Stigma, also funded by MHSA had a booth inside.

Circle of Friends

Far Northern Regional Center had helpful information about services for people with disabilities. Tegerstangs Orthotics and Prosthetics presented and array of their products. Tri Counties Bank was present to promote financial health,

Numerous Native American organizations were represented including California Indian Manpower Consortium Inc., The California Rural Indian Health Board, Indian Child Welfare Act – Pit River Tribe, Indigenous Prayer Runners, Local Indians for Education, Native American Training and Technical Assistance, and the California Tribal TANF Partnership. In addition there were several booths featuring Native American jewelry, crafts, and pine nuts.

Promoting healthy lifesyle for Native American Youth

Women’s health issues were addressed by the Women’s Healthcare Association of Redding, Every Woman Counts, Women’s Health Specialists, and NorCal Think Pink.

NorCal Think Pink

For seniors, Health Insurance Counseling and Advocacy Program (HICAP) was present to provide health insurance counseling. Eagle Lake Village Senior Living was there. Mayers Intermountain Hospice had a booth to help families cope with the issues of terminal illness and grief.

Rising Sun Fitness Cliub

Healthy Shasta was present to promote healthy lifestyle choices, and Rising Sun Fitness came to feature fitness.

Fred Gideon and Susann Chism from American Red Cross

The Red Cross, Burney Fire Protection District, and US Forest Service all had booths to explain programs for safety, fire protection, and emergency response. The Burney Mosquito Abatement District was there. There was also a booth for California Telephone Access Programs offering a variety of phones for people with special needs.

Event SNIPP came to promote animal health.

To complement the array of heath service professionals, government agencies, and business the Pit River Health Clinic provided a wonderful lunch for everyone who attended.

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Filed under Burney, health, Pit River Tribe

2018 Good Medicine Health Fair

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July 12, 2018 · 5:40 am

Pit River Health Service holds appreciation barbecue

Pit River Health Service, Inc. (PRHS) held an appreciation barbecue at the Veterans Hall in Burney on Friday, June 29 to recognize and thank all who were involved in helping achieve accreditation from the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care (AAAHC). About 50 people, including board members, administrators, staff and health care providers attended.

Glenna Moore gives a slide show reviewing the process and congratulating all involved

The program began with a slide presentation by Glenna Moore, Executive Director of PRHS. Ms. Moore explained the detailed process they had gone through to meet all of the high standards required for accreditation.

The journey involved extensive self-assessment and on-site survey by AAAHC expert surveyors – physicians, nurses, and administrators who are actively involved in ambulatory health care. The survey is consultative and educational, designed to help clinics achieve the highest standard of care for their patients. Ms. Moore thanked and congratulated everyone present for their hard work.

Executive Director Glenna Moore recounting the journey to excellence

Following the slide show, Laurie Hayward, Health Board Chairperson, spoke of the compassion and commitment that contributed to success.

“I am so proud of you,” she said. “We worked together as a team, a clinic, and a community. We would not be here if you did not have compassion for your job.”

Certificates of appreciation had been prepared for all who participated. Executive Director Moore presented Betty George, Treasurer of the Board, with a beautiful blanket in appreciation of her work. Other members of the Board are: Denise Winn Wright, Vice Chairperson; Louise Davis, Board Secretary; and Lester ‘Wayne’ Gibbs.

Betty George thanked for her service

Chairperson Hayward then presented Glenna Moore with a certificate and a purse.

Laurie Hayward, Denise Petersen, and Glenna Moore

After the presentation of certificates, there was a cake cutting ceremony.

Celebrating excellence and achievement

Board members posed for a commemorative picture,

Board members standing by motto and cake

and Chairperson Hayward cut the cake.

Board members standing by motto and cake

Tribal elder Jessica Jim and Administrative Assistant Denise Petersen also shared in the celebration of compassion, commitment, and community.

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Pit River Health Service Achieves Accreditation

Press release from Pit River Health Services, Inc. June 6:

Burney, CA—Pit River Health Service, Inc. (PRHS) announced today that it has achieved full accreditation from the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care (AAAHC).  Accreditation distinguishes this community health clinic from many other outpatient facilities by providing the highest quality of care to its patients as determined by an independent, external process of evaluation.

Status as an accredited organization means that PRHS has met nationally recognized standards for the provision of quality health care set by AAAHC. More than 6,000 ambulatory health care organizations across the United States are accredited by AAAHC. Not all ambulatory health care organizations seek accreditation; not all that undergo the rigorous on-site survey process are granted accreditation. The accreditation covers PRHS clinics in both Burney and Alturas, CA.

Ambulatory health care organizations seeking accreditation by AAAHC undergo an extensive self-assessment and on-site survey by AAAHC expert surveyors – physicians, nurses, and administrators who are actively involved in ambulatory health care. The survey is consultative and educational, presenting best practices to help an organization improve its care and services.

“Accreditation has been a longstanding goal for PRHS. It is nice to be recognized for these efforts, but more importantly, we want our patients to be assured they can expect quality care from our clinics.” stated Lauri Hayward, PRHS Board Chairperson.

About Pit River Health Service ( www.pitriverhealthservice.org ):

Pit River Health Service is the primary healthcare system for the Pit River Tribe of the Intermountain region, but also welcomes non-native patients. In rural northeast California, where primary care services can be few and far between, PRHS clinics provide an important access point for the community. This is especially true because PRHS gladly accepts Medi-Cal, Medicare, and a wide variety of other healthcare coverage plans.

PRHS is a non-profit 501(c)(3) ambulatory health clinic first established in 1979. The purpose of PRHS is to serve the entire community with special focus on the American Indian population. Services offered include medical, dental, and behavioral health services, transportation, outreach, and senior nutrition. PRHS has two clinics, one is located at the base of the Burney Mountain in Burney, Ca and the other is located on the Pit River XL reservation near Alturas, Ca. PRHS will soon be opening a third location for behavioral health and outreach services in downtown Alturas. We are open to Native and non-Native patients and accept Medi-Cal, Partnership, Medicare, and most private insurances. We value all our patients and as our mission statement says, we provide the highest quality healthcare services to them.

About AAAHC ( www.aaahc.org ):

The Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care (AAAHC) is a private, non-profit organization formed in 1979. AAAHC is a nationally recognized leader in developing standards to advance and promote patient safety, quality care, and value for ambulatory health care through peer-based accreditation processes, education, and research. A certificate of accreditation is awarded to organizations that are found to be in compliance with AAAHC Standards.

AAAHC currently accredits more than 6,000 organizations in a wide variety of ambulatory health care settings including ambulatory surgery centers, community health centers, medical and dental group practices, medical home practices, and managed care organizations, as well as Indian and student health centers, among others. They are also the official accrediting organization for the US Coast Guard.

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Intermountain Preparedness Group holds interagency exercise to prepare for mass causality events

On Thursday April 26 from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m., about two dozen representatives from emergency response units, healthcare facilities, and support services met at the Burney Fire Hall to conduct a “Mass Casualty Table Top Exercise.”

Burney Fire District Chief Monte Keady facilitating the discussion

The meeting was a function of the Intermountain Preparedness Group that was formed to “attain shared preparedness and bring stability during crisis.” Agencies attending the meeting included CAL FIRE, Shasta County Fire Service, McArthur Fire Protection District, Burney Fire Protection District, Mayers Memorial Hospital District, Mountain Valley Health Centers, Pit River Health Service, Sierra Emergency Medical Services Alliance, Southern Cascades EMS District, Shasta County OEM, Shasta County Health and Human Services, and the American Red Cross,  .

The exercise was facilitated by Burney Fire Protection District Chief Monte Keady. Participants were organized into three groups according to their mission and function. The three groups were: 1) Fire, Hazmat, and Emergency Services; 2) Health Care Facilities; and 3) Support Services.

Chief Keady began the exercise by presenting a scenario of a mass causality event. The scenario involved a 40 vehicle fire on Hwy 299 in which 40 vehicles were involved. It included injuries and fatalities, a fire that began to spread, and a hazardous waste spill.

After briefing the audience on the situation, Keady asked each group to engage in a fifteen minute discussion about how they would respond to this emergency in the first 60-90 minutes.

Group discussions in progress

Afterward, a representative from each group presented a summary of their discussion. In their summaries they discussed how they would plan, organize and staff each of their operations, set up a command structure and communications, organize relief efforts and transportation, provide services, set up shelters, etc. After each presentation there was an opportunity for question and answer and open discussion.

Mayers Hosptial CEO Louis Ward reporting for the Health Services discussion group

The rest of the agenda had two more scenario updates followed by group, intergroup, and open discussions. The last scenario update involved the close of the incident. The final event of the exercise was “Lessons learned,” a thirty minute period of shared reflection during which participants could share “Aha moments.”

The meeting also included breaks during which participants could share refreshments and talk on a less formal basis.

For more information about the Intermountain Preparedness Group, citizens can contact any of the participating agencies.

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Filed under Burney, Fire Departments, health, Law enforcement, Mayers Memorial Hospital, Mountain Valleys Health Cliinic, Pit River Tribe, Public Safety

Hope is Alive! at Billy’s Roadside Cafe

About 50 people gathered at Billy’s Roadside Café in Montgomery Creek on Friday evening October 6 to hear poets and musicians share a message of hope and inspiration.

The program was sponsored by Stand Against Stigma, funded by Shasta County Health and Human Services to address issues associated with mental illness and to provide suicide prevention services. The Hope is Alive! open mics celebrate the theme of healing through  performance arts.  The gathering in Montgomery Creek was the fourth Hope is Alive open mic in the Intermountain Area and the 12th in Shasta County at large.

Marc Dadigan, community education specialist for the Shasta County Health and Human Services Agency, emceed the event. The evening performances began with a performance by Randy and Verena Compton followed by the talented Billy Riggins who share some of his original rap music.

Billy Riggins uplifts the audience with his original poetic rap

Mental illness is often associated with substance abuse.

Larry Harris from Redding shares several poignant poems

Poet Larry Harris from Redding shared three poems of personal experience describing the struggles and victory that his family experienced through their daughter’s bout with mental illness. It was a tale of hope prevailing over despair.

After a period of substance abuse resulting in mental breakdown, his daughter successfully went through therapy and recovery and now leads a successful happy life as an actress.

In one particularly poignant poem, Harris talked about his daughter going to a Simon and Garfunkle concert in San Francisco on her own after rehab. Harris shared the emotion a parent goes through as he experiences the restoration of trust, letting go and watching his child emerge as a happy independent young woman.

Michael Bennett and Kimberly Michelle Davis from the Circle of Friends in Burney both sang songs. Bennett charmed people with an a capella rendering of Mac Davis “Oh Lord it’s Hard to be Humble.” Ms. Davis once again delighted the audience as she sang Broadway show tunes in her lovely soprano voice.

A young lady who had traveled two hours to attend got up and recited a short poem.

A highlight of the evening was the personal testimony of David Martinez, a spokesman for Stand Against Stigma’s Brave Faces who has suffered from depression, anxiety and PTSD. Mr. Martinez is a member of the Wintu tribe. He has been a biker, a cowboy and an EMT for the fire department. He has also worked in Redding as a substance abuse counselor. After sharing his story, Martinez shared two popular songs, “Pancho and Lefty,” and “City of New Orleans”.

A testimony and two songs from an elder

Singer-songwriter Mauro livened things up with several of his original songs.

Mauro sings some soul stirring originals

Next, the audience was treated to a performance of Native American Rap by Louis Gustafson and his family. As well as singing, Gustafson also plays bass and performs with Pit Crew. He also is a wonderful drummer who performed at the 2015 Burney Basin Days with the Pit River Nation Drum Group.

Louis Gustafson and his family performing Native American rap

The evening was closed out by Alex Colvin and George Whitfield. Colvin opened with a poem “In This World of Heart and Mind” expressing the healing power of love and then sang “Live for Others.” Alex and George then sang “Ghost Riders in the Sky” together.

Before singing two songs,  “Sounds of Silence” and “Vietnam Song.” George talked about the seriousness of mental illness and suicide plaguing our country. Seventeen veterans die every day from suicide.

“Don’t let stigma stand in your way,” Whitman said, “If you feel like your life is going to pieces, reach out for help.”

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Filed under Art, Hope is Alive!, Mental Health, Montgomery Creek, Pit River Tribe

Pit River Casino donates $5000 to fund Kid Fit Program

On May 11, Pit River Casino General Manager Mike Avelar came to Tri Counties Community Network at the Intermountain Community Center to present a check for $5000 for the Kid Fit Program. The donation ensures that this year’s Kid Fit program will be fully funded.

Mike Avelar with staff and children at Tri CountiyCommunity Network

Avelar said, “We are always happy to do whatever we can to help the community, because without the community we would not be here.”

Shaylene Herndon is the Kid Fit project manager. The program has 7 goals:

  1. Decreasing the incidence of Childhood Obesity in our region
  2. Increasing the level of physical activity by local families
  3. Raising awareness of healthy lifestyle choices
  4. Increasing use of our local parks, facilities, and other community programs
  5. Broadening understanding of healthy food and snack choices
  6. Building a stronger community by gathering families together in a healthy proactive way, and
  7. Collaborating with already established community events.

Kid Fit will host five free fun-filled events this year for families of all socio-economic and ethnic backgrounds.

The opening activity will be “Funky Fitness Fun” at Bailey Park at 6 p.m. on Tuesday, June 13.

On June 20, Kid Fit will sponsor a Night Hike at 6 p.m. at Burney Falls State Park.

On June 29, Kid Fit will host a Family Track and Field Night as one of the opening events of this year’s Burney Basin Days.

Tuesday, July 11, will feature “Splish, Splash, and and Swim” at the Raymond H. Berry Community Pool beginning at 6 p.m.

The final Kid Fit event for 2017 will be the “Master Mud Run” on Tuesday July 18 at Bailey Park at 6 p.m.

Mud run 2016

Herndon says, “We expect that Kid Fit Summer 2017 will benefit 150 plus children and their parents and result in over 5000 hours of documented physical activity.”

Kid Fit began in 2006 to address the obesity epidemic that was threatening the health of children in our country. Since that time, thanks to increased public awareness and changes in the food supply and school lunches, obesity rates have declined.

Changes in technology have caused decreased physical activity for children and adults. Eight to eighteen year olds spend an average of 7 hours and 11 minutes engaged with electronic screen media. This is an increase of 2.5 hours in the last ten years.  As a result, children spend less time in traditional childhood activities and outdoor play.

According to Herndon, excessive screen time has been linked to increased psychological difficulties that include hyperactivity, emotional and conduct problems, difficulties with peers, and poor school performance.

Kid Fit is designed not only to increase physical activity but also to increase social connections. Research done by the Strengthening Families Program  has shown that social connections promote family health, child well-being, and optimal youth development.

For more information about the Kid Fit Program call Shaylene Herndon at 430-335-4600.

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