Category Archives: Schools

Greg Hawkins to retire as FRJUSD Superintendent

Greg Hawkins has informed the Fall River Joint Unified School District Board of Trustees that he will be retiring as Superintendent at the end of the 2018-2019 school year.

Looking back over a career in the school district spanning almost four decades, Hawkins said with a smile, “The whole picture just been great, from my first teaching job up to the present day.”

FRJUSD Superintendent Greg Hawkins

Hawkins moved to Fall River Mills with his family in 1959 when he was three years old. He attended Fall River Elementary School and Fall River Junior Senior High School. He was in the 9th grade when Burney High School opened. He graduated from Fall River High School in 1974.

After graduating he attended Shasta Community College and received his AA and then went on the California  State University, Chico where he earned his BA in Physical Education in 1978. He continued on to get his teaching credential doing his student teaching at Red Bluff High School and received his teaching credentials in 1979.

That summer was an eventful summer. After receiving his teaching credentials, he returned home to marry his high school sweetheart, Rena Oiler. They have been happily married for 40 years and have three sons: Brent, 36, Tyler, 34, and Preston 32. They have two grandchildren, one boy Rider who is three years old, and a seven month old granddaughter Raiya.

For their honeymoon, the couple  went to Happy Camp, where Hawkins was hired by the Siskiyou Union High School District to teach English and Drama at the high school. He also coached Football, Basketball, and Baseball . He was named Happy Camp’s High School Teacher of the Year in 1979.

Hawkins taught at Happy Camp though 1981. In 1982, he came to Burney to teach English at Burney High School.

“It was one of my best years of teaching. Great town, great staff,” he said.

It was also interesting experience coaching the Burney sports teams who had been his rivals not so many years before.

Concerning his years of coaching, Hawkins said that over time he realized that the relationships with the students was more important than winning or losing. Some years you have really talented players and an extraordinary season. But the years when the players you work with are not as gifted, the kids still work just as hard with just as much enthusiasm and it is just as inspiring.

Then from 1982 through 1983, Hawkins worked with the Regional Occupation Program, assisted some teachers, and taught English part time.

From 1983 until 1996, he taught English, Social Studies, and PE at Fall River High School.

After receiving his Pupil Personnel Services Credential, Hawkins served as full time school counselor for Fall River Junior-Senior High School from 1997-2000. He earned his M.S. in Pupil Personnel Services from the University of LaVerne in 1997.

From 2000-2006, he served as Vice Principal at Fall River Junior Senior High School. He also continued to serve as counselor and in addition became athletic director. Then from 2006 to 2011, he was Principal of the Fall River High School. In 2011, he was appointed District Superintendent.

In the role of Superintendent, Hawkins said the budget is always of primary concern. It would be nice to always have the money for everything you want to do, but there are often changes in state funding. The challenge is to make sure that we continue to meet the needs of our students and the community for optimum education.

He also said that maintaining a safe environment for students and teachers has become a top priority. He believes that the district has done its best to ensure that the schools are safe and that teachers, staff, students and law enforcement are prepared to respond quickly and appropriately in case of any emergency.

“One thing that I am most proud of is when one of our graduates goes on to become successful and then comes back to give back to our community. Thirty percent of our teachers are graduates from this district. That’s rewarding!”

Many of the employees of the District were once his students.

Hawkins is an affable people person. He spoke warmly of his appreciation for all of the support that individuals and organizations in the community give to the schools. He also praised the staff, teachers, and Board Members who have worked hard to make the school system successful. Most of all he spoke of how much he has enjoyed interacting with the students as a teacher, coach, counselor, and administrator for the past 36 years and how rewarding it is when past students come up to say hello and remind him of experiences they shared in the past.

After retiring, Hawkins looks forward to traveling with his wife and spending time with his children and grandchildren.

Hawkins will retire at the end of the school year on June 28. He believes that the FRJUSD is in good shape. During the remainder of his term, he wants to ensure that everything will be in order so that there will be a smooth transition for his successor.

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Filed under Burney, Fall River Mills, MacArthur, Schools, youth

Mt. View students give out Christmas presents at Burney Annex

Three students from Mt. View High School, Elias Avelar, Danell Brumbaugh, and Jordan Potts, gave out presents to 55 patients at the Burney Annex on Wednesday afternoon December 19.

Danell Brumbaugh, Teacher Becky Mock, patient Sally Schmidt, Elias Avelar, Superintendent Greg Hawkins, and Vice Principal Becky Torgrimson

The presents, hand-handmade by students, included pinecone-peanut butter-bird seed bird feeders, homemade snowflake decorations with glitter, and water bottles and bags filled with sugar-free candy and gum.

The activity was part of the students’ empathy unit. School Nurse Karen Van Cleave comes to the school once a week to teach a class on empathy.

According to teacher Becky Mock, the purpose of the unit is to “help students to put themselves in the shoes of others and serve people in need.”

Teacher Lori Carlson suggested the idea of giving gifts to patients at the Annex. The visit to the Annex also helps to fulfill the students’ community service requirement for graduation.

Teacher Becky Mock, FRJUSD Superintendent Greg Hawkins, BHS Vice Principal Becky Torgrimson, and MVHS Secretary Shaun Davis accompanied the students as they delivered the presents.

 

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Burney Jr. Sr. High School performs The Annual Sounds of the Season

The Music Department of the Burney Junior Senior High School presented there 2018 Winter Concert at the Burney High School gym on Tuesday evening December 18. The Concert was titled “The Annual Sounds of the Season.”

Vocal Ensemble

Hundreds of parents, family members, teachers, and friends came to hear the students perform.

Beginning Band

Altogether, more than seventy students took part in the concert under the direction of music teacher Hugo Castro.

Advanced Band

The concert began with the Vocal Ensemble singing five songs. Mary Lawson, Angel Estrada, and Makenna Crook were featured as a trio,

Featured trio

and Christinia James and Neveah Trump did a duet.

Featured duet

Next the beginning band, which this year has more than 40 students, performed five songs with a wide variety of instruments.

Clarinets

Diverse instruments

The Advanced Band played the final five selections ending with a lively well arranged rendition of Feliz Navidad. Mr. Castro brought out his saxophone and joined in playing with the students.

Flute and sax

All in all, the students displayed their musical talents performing a delightful selection of traditional Christmas carols and popular songs of the season.

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Operation Warm Winter provides coats and boots to disadvantaged elementary school children

Operation Warm Winter provided new warm coats and boots to more than a dozen elementary school children at the GIVEAWAY at Word of Life Assembly of God Church (WOLA) on Thursday afternoon between 3-5 p.m. More families came to the program on Thursday to sign up. They will also receive boots and coats in the near future.

Kira Hernandez giving out boots, coats, and beanies

Burney High School Junior Kira Hernandez organized Operation Warm Winter as her Senior Project. Burney Elementary School teachers assisted in selecting 15 children who needed warm coats and boots. Parents signed up in advance so that the exact size needed could be purchased. The program is funded by community donations. A major fundraiser for the program the past few years has been the concert by the Ohio Northern University Choir held in the late Spring.

Signing up in the foyer

In addition, scores of people from the community came to select coats, sweaters, sweat shirts, pants, shirts, and other  gently used items that had been donated by people from the community. Altogether, over 200 people signed in for the GIVEAWAY.

One recipient said, “This is such an unexpected blessing. I haven’t had a good warm winter coat for years. I also found a pair of wonderful pants in my size which is almost impossible to find.”

Many items to choose from

WOLA church secretary Kathy Newton helped Ms. Hernandez to organize the GIVEAWAY at the church. She also helped with fundraising and collecting clothing donations. The Burney High School Leadership Club came in the morning to help set up tables and display clothing. Volunteers helped to man the sign-up tables and oversee the event. Pastor Ken Frazier was present to welcome and chat with all who came.

Operation Warm Winter was started in 2007 when Stephanie Pruitt, a WOLA church member and wife of a BHS teacher, discovered that some elementary school children could not go outside to play during recess in the winter because they did not have adequate winter clothing. Ms. Pruitt ran the program for six years. Parents and community members interested in learning more about the program can contact Burney Elementary School or Kathy Newton at WOLA.

For the last two years, a Burney High School student has organized the program for their Senior Project. Last year junior Alexus Bellino organized the program. This year Kira Hernandez has successfully overseen the operation.

Kira Hernandeex organized this year’s Operation Warm Winter for her senior project

Ms. Hernandez said, “Operation Warm Winter means helping the community out in a way that makes them feel loved and welcome.”

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Filed under Burney, Schools, Word of Life Assembly of God, youth

Burney Elementary Craft Fair and Soup Café – Good food, Good vendors, and lots of Good people

Burney Elementary School PTA Homemade Craft Fair and Soup Café was great! Hundreds of residents came to shop and visit on Saturday November 17 as a score of vendors displayed their wares.

Burney Elementary School PTA Homemade Craft Fair and Soup Café

The affair was sponsored by the Burney Elementary PTA and organized by Kathy Urlie. Burney 4-H served delicious soups.

Items displayed included McKay Brothers crafts made from natural sources, Andrew Urlie’s art pottery, a variety of jewelry, Christmas decorations, cloth snowmen, mittens and aprons, bath towels, adult bibs, purses, scented soaps and lotions by Shasta Soap Company, photography, handcrafted cards, paintings, Michelle’s creations, blankets, homemade jams, floral design, microwave bowls. coffee cozies, wood toys, nuts and baked goods.

Linda Colvin displaying her handcrafted cards and art

Langston Tate represented the Burney High School AG classes displaying floral design. The AG classes were raising money for one of their field trips to study agricultural techinques and also to install aquaponics at the greenhouse at the high school

Langston Tate showing BHS AG classes Floral Design

Jackie Young and Marie Conley had a table selling assorted nuts for Soroptomist International of Burney-Fall River to raise money for scholarships. S-Club was selling baked good to raise money for Operation Warm Winter.

Jackie Young and Marie Conley featuring Assorted Soroptomist Nuts

One new vendor from Shingletown this year was Enjoy by Bev. Bev Thacker and her husband raise llamas and alpacas. They shear their coats and spin the fiber into yarn. Bev uses the yarn to crochet and knit purses, hats, gloves, and scarves. With the money they make they can buy more food for the animals so that they can produce more fiber.

“We enjoy it!” Bev said.

Enjoy by Bev

When asked what she thought of the Burney Elementary Craft Fair, Bev responded succinctly with a smile, “We like it. Good turnout, good vendors, and a lot of good people.”

Who could ask for more?

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Albert Scheckla and Sage Harner honored as October Students of the Month

Albert Scheckla and Sage Harner were honored as October Students of the Month at the Burney Lions Club on Thursday evening October 14. Scheckla was named 12th grade student of the month and Harner was named 8th grade student of the month.

BHS Principal Ray Guerrero, Sage Harner, Albert Scheckla, and Lion George Whitfield

The students were introduced by Burney High School Principal Ray Guerrero.

Senior Albert Scheckla has a grade point of 4.29, the highest grade point a student can earn taking AP classes. He is DSB President and Boys State Delegate. He is active in Leos Club, Interact Club, FNL, and S Club and plays on the baseball and basketball teams.

Albert enjoys snorkeling, hiking and traveling. In his spare time he likes to work, do volunteer work, watch television, and sleep. In the future he hopes to visit Palau Micronesia because his dad has been there and talked about it and he wants to see what it is like for himself.

After graduating, Albert plans to go to Shasta College and then transfer to Cal Poly, Chico State, or Sacramento State to get a degree in Mechanical Engineering.

Albert’s father and mother, Brian and Barbara Scheckla were both at the dinner. His dad said, “He does so much at school that we hardly ever get to see him. It would be nice to see him do some traveling because everyone who travels comes back with a different point of view.”

Albert’s father has been to over 60 countries.

Eighth grader Sage Harner has a 4.0 grade point average. She likes science and reading and plays on the girls volleyball team. She enjoys drawing, reading, and writing.

After finishing high school, she wants to go to college and become an author or an anesthesiologist. She hopes that one day she will publish a book.

Sage’s father and mother, Marti and Lori Harner, were present to watch their daughter honored. Mr. Harner said, “It is important that young people recognize what society expect of them and also to receive the rewards.”

Lion George Whitfield presented Albert with a check for $100 and Sage with a check for $50 on behalf of the Burney Lions Club.

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Deputy District Attorney speaks at Mt. View High School

Shasta County Deputy District Attorney Josh Brown and Investigator Joe Scarry came to Mountain View High School in Burney on Wednesday morning November 14 to give a slide presentation on numerous issues such as cyber security, identity theft, sexting, cyber bullying, child pornography, stealing, and sex with  minors. About two dozen students and teachers from Mt. View and Soldier Mountain High Schools and Burney and Fall River Community Day Schools were present for the presentation.

Deputy DA Brown engages in discussion with students

When asked “What does the District Attorney do?” Deputy Brown explained that he prosecutes crimes, determines what crimes have been committed, and sends cases to court.

As he showed the slides, Deputy Brown asked questions and engaged the students in discussion. Brown explained various laws and their application and students openly and honestly expressed their experiences and opinions.

The group discussed a person’s “Digital Footprint.” Anyone who uses the internet, posts on social media, makes online purchases, or opens an account creates an online record. This digital footprint can be used by cyber predators  with a negative agenda.

Investigator Scarry stated, “Once you post something, you lose control. The risk of identification theft grows higher, the more online accounts one has.”

Talking about privacy, Brown emphasized that even if a person’s Facebook or Instagram account is marked private, once a person’s friends have access to information they can make it public.

Negative aspects of sexting (sharing sexually explicit messages) can have negative and embarrassing consequences well into the future affecting peoples employment and other relationships. Examples include not being able to own a gun, fewer job opportunities, and if you are an adult, you will have to register as a sex offender, if convicted. Sexting with a minor is considered child pornography.

Minors who sext between other minors is a growing problem, because not only does this put adolescents at risk for social ridicule and cyber-bullying, but it opens up ways for sexual predators to victimize young people.

Possession of child pornography is a felony. Brown advised people that if they received unsolicited child pornography they should report it to local law enforcement.

Child pornography statute

Sexual relations between an adult and a minor was also addressed. It is a crime. The adult is responsible even if the minor misrepresents their age. The law is designed to protect minors and hold adults accountable for knowing the age of their partners.

Deputy AG Brown and Inspector Scarry talk with students

In a lively exchange on theft, Brown emphasized that stealing another person’s property is never all right. Several students made the point that if people were careless or irresponsible with their property they were also partly “at fault.” Brown responded that the carelessness of a victim does not excuse theft. For example, it is not all right or legal to take something from a car if they left the door unlocked or to take something that somebody accidentally left behind when they left a room.

Investigator Scarry told the students that his job was to thoroughly investigate each incident to determine the truth. If a crime was committed, investigation might determine that charges were warranted or exculpatory evidence might emerge which would tend to clear  an accused person of a charge of fault or guilt.

Brown explained that prosecutors need to decide what cases to prosecute. Generally, a prosecutor will not charge a person unless they feel that they have a strong enough case to convince a jury that the person is guilty.

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Filed under Burney, Fall River Mills, Schools, youth