Cade Harner wins 2019 Burney Lions Club Student Speakers Contest

Sophomore Cade Harner won the 2019 Student Speakers Contest at the Burney Lions Hall on Thursday evening February 21. Harner competed against two other Burney High School students, Senior Noah Bishop and Junior Paris Deaton-Geisler.

Judges Rodney and Sally Armstrong, Jiill Barnett, Charlene Sickler, Coach Melissa Madden, Student Speakers Noah Bishop, Cade Harner, Paris Deaton Geisler, and Lion Dr. Bill Cummings

This year’s speech topic is “Freedom of the Press: What does it mean?”  Each student was required to give a speech no longer that ten minutes and no shorter than five minutes. All three speakers emphasized the fundamental importance of freedom of press in a democratic society illustrating their talk with poignant quotes and examples. They also provided examples of dictatorial and autocratic societies in which the government denies freedom of the press. In his succinct speech, Harner addressed the current controversy about “fake news.”

Melissa Madden, activities director at Burney High School, helped to coach the students in preparation for their speeches.

Lion Dr. Bill Cummings officiated the contest. Charlene Charlene Sickler, Sally and Rodney Armstrong, and Jill Barnett served as judges. After all of the scores were tabulated, Dr. Cummings announced the winner.

Lion Dr. Bill Cummings announced that Cade Harner is the winner

All three participants were awarded certificates and presented with a check by Lion George Chapman. Harner won $100 for first place. The other speakers each received $25.

Lion George Chapman and Student Speakers Cade Harner, Parris Deaton Geisler, and Noah Bishop

The Club level contest is the first level of completion in the 82nd Annual Lions Multiple District Four Contest. Harner will now advance to the Zone level contest.

Lions Clubs throughout California and Nevada are holding club level contests during the month of February. Winners will advance through several levels to reach the District, Area, and Multiple District Four Contest.

Altogether, the Lions Fourth District Student Speakers Foundation will provide scholarships totaling $103,500.00. Fifteen District winners will each receive a $4,500 scholarship. Four Area winners will each receive an additional $6,500 scholarship, and the winner of the Multiple District Four Contest will receive an additional $10,000.00 scholarship.

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Burney, Burney Lions Club, youth

Grants available from Shasta Regional Community Foundation

On Monday, February 18, Amanda Hutchings, Program Officer for Shasta Regional Community Foundation sent the following notice to Nonprofit Partners in Shasta County:

“We have heard from a number of you in Shasta County that you have experienced a heavy impact on services or a loss of revenue or donations because of the Carr Fire. With this in mind, we have restructured The McConnell Fund a bit this funding cycle to provide a grant opportunity to offer operating support through a Safety Net program.  Organizational requests ranging from $5,000 – $15,000 will be considered and must be able to demonstrate need in accordance with the guidelines.”

Grant applications and guidelines can be found on the SRCF  website at www.shastarcf.org/grants. The deadline for applications via the online system is March 13 at 5:00 p.m.

Traditional funding opportunity of The McConnell Fund to provide for capital and/or equipment expenditures is also still available. The deadline for these applications is also March 13.

Two other grants available through SRCF with a March deadline are:

  1. The Burney Regional Community Fund that was established to address the needs within the communities of the Greater Burney Region. Grants from this fund are awarded to nonprofit organizations in the region through a competitive process. The deadline for applications is March 6.
  2.  The Redding Rancheria Community fund established by the Redding Rancheria, a federally recognized Tribe whose members are of Pit River, Yana and Wintu decent. This fund was established to give to worthy causes in the surrounding communities. The deadline for applications is March 27.

Other grants available include:

  1. The Animal Welfare Endowment Fund created to provide for the care of animals in Shasta and Siskiyou Counties.  As the fund grows, grants will be made to nonprofit organizations who promote animal welfare such as support for: rabies clinics, spay and neuter services, animal rescue, animal rehabilitation and more. The 2019 deadline has not yet been announced. The window for applications is April until the deadline sometime in June.
  2. Community Arts Endowment Fund that began in 2010 as the Articipate Campaign and is now the Community Arts Endowment Fund at the Shasta Regional Community Foundation. The fund allows grants for the presentation and creation of “new artistic work” to be given in support of artists and art projects such as visual public art, murals and sculptures, and other graphic art forms displayed or presented in public areas in Shasta and Siskiyou counties. The window for applications is April until the deadline sometime in June.
  3. The Women’s Fund of the Shasta Regional Community Foundation began in February 2008 with a founding cabinet of 10 women, representing diverse backgrounds, ages, and perspectives, all from the greater Redding region. The Deadline for applications is September 4, 2019 with an Application Window from  June until the Deadline Date.

Information about Shasta Regional Community organization and all of these funds can be found on the SRCF website https://www.shastarcf.org/. In addition to applying for grants, organizations and individuals who want to support the work of all of these funds are encouraged to contribute.

SRCF has also established a Community Disaster Relief Fund that has been enabled to receive donations for those in the North State impacted by the Carr Fire. The fund focuses on both the short and long-term recovery.

Leave a comment

Filed under Shasta Regional Community Foundation

NEWS ADVISORY: Child abuse/neglect hotline

From Shasta County Health and Human Services Friday 2/15/19:

Power is out at our downtown offices and some of our phone lines are not working correctly. If you need to report child abuse/neglect, please call 225-5144.

 

Leave a comment

Filed under youth

PG&E Continues Restoring Power, Brings in More Resources

From PG&E:

Broken pole

Pacific Gas and Electric Company continues restoring power to thousands of customers each day in the North Valley and has brought in additional workers and mutual aid crews from Oregon to help local crews restore power more quickly.

More than 250 PG&E workers and partner utility workers are in the North Valley, where heavy, low-elevation snow and heavy rains on Wednesday fell trees and damaged power lines and poles. The extensive damage to PG&E equipment, coupled with blocked roads and snowy terrain, impacted 60,000 PG&E customers at its peak on early Wednesday morning.  As of 4 p.m. Friday, about 22,000 customer remain without power, most of them – or about 19,000 – are in Shasta County, which was hit especially hard by severe weather. Nearly 3,000 are without power in Tehama County communities of Cottonwood, Lyonsville, Mineral, Mill Creek and Manton.

Pole set

PG&E has established a small base camp at the Shasta County Fairgrounds in Anderson to stage materials and support crews.

With adverse weather this weekend, there may be fresh power outages. PG&E crews and its partner crews are working to assess and repair damages to electric equipment.

Even if customers don’t see crews in their neighborhood, crews are often working on another part of the system that needs repairs before their power can be restored. Power lines don’t always follow roads and often span fields, forests and rough terrain where access can be difficult in wet conditions.

PG&E knows extended electric outages pose significant challenges for our customers and apologizes for the inconvenience.  Power outages can sometimes affect gas appliances as they require power to operate.

PG&E understands reliable information about restoration timing is necessary to help customers make plans.  Customers may call 800-743-5002 for outage information or visit www.pge.com and click on the outage tab for information.  If no outage restoration time is listed for your outage, PG&E encourages customers to have a plan for possibly being without power for up to a few days.

Leave a comment

Filed under PG&E

Ray Berry’s great granddaughter appears in play about Ray Berry’s Radium Girls case

Dena Transeau

Raymond Berry’s great granddaughter, Dena Transeau, is currently appearing in a play in Frederick Maryland, “Radium Girls,” about a case that Ray Berry litigated in New Jersey in the 1920’s.

Raymond Berry played a major role in Burney history from the 1940’s into the early 1970’s. As an attorney for the Starr family he came to Burney to assess timber properties which the Starr family estate owned. In the 1940’s he moved to Burney, helped to incorporate the Scott Lumber Company, and served as its general manager for nearly three decades. During that time he also helped start the Burney Chamber of Commerce, negotiate the extension of the McCloud railroad into Burney, and start Shasta County Bank that later  merged with Tri-Counties Bank.

Before he came to Burney however, he represented a number of young ladies in the late 1920’s who had worked for the United Radium Company in New Jersey. The case is considered a landmark case in labor, women’s rights, and class action law.

The young women painted the numbers on watch dials with small brushes. They were encouraged by their employers to lick the tips of the brushes with their tongues. After a period of time many of them became seriously ill from radiation poisoning. Some of them glowed in the dark. Some died.

Dena as a radium girl

No one would take the case because the corporations were so powerful and many thought that the statute of limitations had passed. In a last ditch effort, one of the girls found a young Yale-educated lawyer who agreed to take the case. He established that the statute of limitations did not begin until the cause of the illnesses had been established and succeeded in winning a substantial settlement for five of the victims.

The case was well known in labor law history but not widely publicized in popular culture until the last few decades. The play “Radium Girls” was written in 1999 by D. W. Gregory and has become a popular play for youth drama. In 2018, it was named one of the ten most popular plays for high school drama. Gregory lives in Silver Spring Maryland and visited Frederick to offer advise on the production of the play.

Dena plays several characters in the play – one of the girls who dies, and also Katherine Wiley, executive director of the New Jersey Consumer’s League who helps the girls. She leaks the story to the press, creating public outrage, and finds a lawyer Ray Berry to take the case.

Dena Transeau as Katherine Wiley

The director  Gerard Stropnicky is quoted in an article in  the Frederick News-Post as saying, “It kind of makes my hair stand on end when I watch you, carrying that DNA, making the character that is your great-grandfather the full success that he becomes.”

“What’s interesting is that the Raymond Berry in this play, when we first meet him, is kind of clumsy, and he’s kind of a terrible lawyer,” Stropnicky said. “But Ms. Wiley, who Dena plays, builds him into becoming the lawyer who wins the case by the end of the second act.”

In 2016, a British author Kate Moore also published a book, The Radium Girls: They Paid with Their Lives. The Final Fight Was for Justice. In 2017, I also talked with a producer who was making a movie about the radium girls and another who was producing a documentary.

Incidentally, Dena was married last September in the theatre where she is performing. She had planned to be married on the beach in North Carolina but the location was changed at the last minute when a hurricane hit the Outer Banks. Her casting in the play came about as a result of the hasty change in venue.

Dena Transeau (nee Colvin) is the granddaughter of Ray Berry’s eldest daughter Alice B. Stone, and the daughter of Alex and Linda Colvin who live in Burney.

See also

Case argued by Raymond H. Berry featured in new book by British author

Texas School Girl does National History Day project on “Radium Girl” cases

Baltimore, bicycle riders, Radium Girls, and Ray Berry

Leave a comment

Filed under Burney, Pit River Area History

Dr. Daniel Dahle named 2019 “Country Doctor of the Year” by Staff Care

Press release from Staff Care, and AMN Healthcare company:

DALLAS, TX – Serving an area larger than five states and a community 45 miles from the nearest traffic light, Dr. Daniel Dahle is the medical version of a hero in a Clint Eastwood western, keeping the local citizens safe not with six shooters but with over three decades of medical expertise and an unflinching commitment to personalized care.

Dr. Dahle checking a heart

For his exceptional record of compassion and service, Dr. Dahle has been named 2019 Country Doctor of the Year.

Presented by Staff Care, an AMN Healthcare company, the Country Doctor of the Year Award recognizes the spirit, skill, and dedication of America’s rural medical practitioners. The leading temporary physician staffing firm in the United States, Staff Care has presented the national award since 1992 to exemplary physicians practicing in communities of 30,000 or less.

“Dr. Dahle is more than an outstanding primary care physician,” said Jeff Decker, President of Staff Care, “he is one of the pillars on which his community stands. The people, the health system, and the economy of his region simply could not do without him.”

Raised on a potato farm near the California/Oregon border, Daniel Dahle served as a medical corpsman in Vietnam before earning a Ph.D. in radiation biology and a medical degree at the University of Rochester in New York. In 1985, he elected to return to his home region and began practicing in Bieber, California, a frontier town of 300 people located in an isolated section of northeastern California, where he has continued to practice for 33 years.

The sole primary care physician in Bieber, Dr. Dahle is on staff at Big Valley Health Center, a Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC) that sees all patients, regardless of ability to pay. He draws patients from a service area that extends over 7,500 square miles, larger than Rhode Island, Delaware, Connecticut, Hawaii and New Jersey, and to a large extent has been personally responsible for maintaining health services in the region.

Dr. Dahle visiting a patient

In addition to seeing patients at the health center, Dr. Dahle drives 25 miles one way almost every day to see inpatients at Mayers Memorial Hospital in the town of Fall River Mills, where he also covers the emergency department and cares for long-term patients at the hospital’s nursing home. Over half the hospital’s inpatients are admitted by Dr. Dahle, and his presence in the community has been vital to the hospital’s continued viability.

“As a rural hospital goes, so goes the community,” Decker said. “Few people want to stay in or move to a place where there are no healthcare facilities. By supporting the local hospital, Dr. Dahle has done more than keep patients alive – he has kept the community alive.”

Dr. Dahle has delivered over 1,000 babies in his career, often under trying circumstances. Many of the residents in the local valleys, including much of the student body at Bieber’s high school where Dr. Dahle coached track for 25 years, were delivered by Dr. Dahle. His skills as a diagnostician are legendary, as one particularly telling incident illustrates. When a long-term patient and co-worker presented with pain and mental confusion, Dr. Dahle correctly diagnosed herpes encephalitis, despite encountering this rare condition only one previous time in approximately 350,000 patient encounters. The condition is commonly fatal, but by rushing the patient to a tertiary care center hours away and insisting on proper treatment, Dr. Dahle is credited with saving her life.

Not all of the duties that fall to a frontier doctor are strictly clinical. In one instance, Dr. Dahle was present when a knife wielding assailant attacked the local sheriff. Dr. Dahle was able to subdue the man with a forearm shiver. Most of his activities, however, are much more benign. One patient describes how Dr. Dahle was able to provide her dying husband with a last wish, personally escorting him on a scuba diving trip to Hawaii, while another relates how Dr. Dahle revived her newborn when the infant was not breathing. Virtually all of the town’s residents (including Clint Eastwood himself, who has a ranch in the area) have been positively impacted by him in one way or another.

Now aged 70 and contemplating retirement, Dr. Dahle has made educating future care givers part of his mission.   Each year he provides training to medical residents from the University of California, Davis as well as students from the physician assistant program at the University of Iowa. He is well known for sharing his “zebras” with students, medical slang for patients whose maladies are masked or otherwise difficult to diagnose.   Dr. Dahle is hoping to pass the torch on to a husband and wife duo who will soon be completing their medical training and who Dr. Dahle has been recruiting since the couple was in medical school.   Though he has seen rural practice evolve during his tenure, Dr. Dahle believes the essence remains the same.

“Much has changed in 30 years,” said Dr. Dahle, “but patients still respond to someone who really knows them and to someone who really cares.”

As the 2019 Country Doctor of the Year, Dr. Dahle will be able to enjoy two weeks of time off, as Staff Care will provide a temporary physician to fill in for him at no charge, a service valued at approximately $10,000. He also will receive the award’s signature plaque featuring a country doctor making his rounds on a horse and buggy, an engraved stethoscope, and a monogrammed lab coat. Additional information about the Country Doctor of the Year Award can be found at www.countrydoctoraward.com.

About Staff Care and AMN Healthcare
Staff Care is the nation’s leading temporary physician staffing firm and is a company of AMN Healthcare (NYSE: AMN) the largest healthcare workforce solutions company in the United States . For more information, visit www.staffcare.com or www.amnhealthcare.com.

2 Comments

Filed under health, Uncategorized

Local Rotarian goes to India to administer polio vaccine to children

News release from Bob Jehn, Rotary Club of Burney-Fall River:

Rotarian Patricia Bergman headed to Delhi on January 28 to join Anil Garg of the Rotary Club of Simi Valley, California, along with a group of Rotarians from around the world to administer polio vaccine to children in India. The group will be vaccinating children during the country’s National Immunization Days.

Burney-Fall River Rotarian Patricia with children in India.

“When this program was started back in 1985, there were 1,000 cases per day worldwide, and it was endemic in 125 countries,” said Bergman. “Last year we had only 30 cases worldwide; the year before that we only had 22 cases worldwide, and that was in two countries, Pakistan and Afghanistan. So, we are very, very, very close in eradicating the disease.”

Bergman and the group attended three orientation programs with representatives from the World Health Organization, UNICEF and India’s national polio committee office.

Burney-Fall River Rotarian Patricia Bergman administering polio vaccine to children in India.

India hasn’t had a polio case in five years, but because the virus is still present in Pakistan and Afghanistan, and it would take only one flight to bring the virus back into the country where, so far, Rotary has spent over $8 billion in this program since 1985.

On Feb. 1, the team flew to Nagpur, located in central India, where they were taken around the local areas to meet with different Rotary clubs. High school, middle school, and elementary school students went around town with banners promoting a polio-free country, a polio-free city, rallying to motivate people.

On February 2, the group began to administer the liquid drops to children 5 and younger.

“It is very satisfying to be able to participate in this Rotary-sponsored program,” said Bergman. “To be on the ground with a program that Rotary has been working on since I joined the organization 25 years ago is a truly humbling experience.”

Leave a comment

Filed under Rotary Club of Burney-Fall River