Tag Archives: Alex Colvin

Fireman’s Carnival fun for children and parents

For more than forty years the fireman’s carnival has been raising money for the McArthur Fire Department.

Lots of fun for all

This year, Saturday evening March 2, hundreds of children and parents came to the Inter-Mountain Fairgrounds to win prizes in a dozen different events.

Hoping to win a loveable bear

Made it

A fun drive

A team effort

Ready for a dunk

Won a goldfish

The do-do duck tried to escape

Meanwhile in Ingram Hall over a hundred people enjoyed playing Bingo for prizes.

Bingo is fun too

This year Inter-Mountain royalty was there to assist the Carnival.

Princesses Sara Dean and Hallee Olsen

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Filed under Fire Departments, Intermountain Fair, MacArthur, youth

Hunter Whitaker wins AWANA Grand Prix

Hunter Whitaker won the Awana Grand Prix Race on Thursday evening at Intermountain Baptist Church. The average time for Hunter’s car was 2.871 seconds.

Hunter Whitaker wins the Awana Grand Prix

Shadrach Hennessey won best car design for the Spark age group competition, and Matthew Hennessey won best car design for the Truth and Training (T&T) age group.

Shadrach Hennessey and Matthew Hennessey won best design

More than 100 people came to watch as 35 cars built by children in the Awana youth program competed in the race. Each child built and designed his car from a kit including a block of wood wheels and axles.

The race was conducted by Awana leaders Peter and Joshua Hennessey.

Awana Leaders Peter and Joshua Hennessey with cars ready to race

Before the race Gerry Mead, who oversees the Awana program at Intermountain Baptist, gave a short talk in which he told the children that life is like a racing event. The goal is to reach the finish line. The finish line is to make it to heaven. To make it to heaven one needs to believe in Jesus.

Jerry Mead gave introductory remarks

Then, the race was on.

The race is on

The cars race in four lanes. Every car ran four heats so that they all had a chance to compete in each lane. Times were determined by an electronic device at the finish line and the average times for all four heats were determined by computer. Hunter’s car not only won the  race but his car beat last year’s winning time in all four races.

The competition was swift and close

About sixty children from the Burney area participate in the Awana program that is held each Thursday evening from Fall through Spring.

Awana is a world-wide nonprofit ministry focused on providing Christian youth education for children ages 2-18. It was founded in 1950 in Illinois and has expanded throughout the United States and the world. Currently, Awana works through 58,000 churches throughout the world to serve 4 million children in 120 counties.

The name Awana is derived from the first letters of “Approved Workmen Are Not Ashamed” derived from 2 Timothy 2:15. The program includes two age groups, Sparks for younger children and T&T for older youth.

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Filed under Burney, Churches, youth

Cade Harner wins 2019 Burney Lions Club Student Speakers Contest

Sophomore Cade Harner won the 2019 Student Speakers Contest at the Burney Lions Hall on Thursday evening February 21. Harner competed against two other Burney High School students, Senior Noah Bishop and Junior Paris Deaton-Geisler.

Judges Rodney and Sally Armstrong, Jiill Barnett, Charlene Sickler, Coach Melissa Madden, Student Speakers Noah Bishop, Cade Harner, Paris Deaton Geisler, and Lion Dr. Bill Cummings

This year’s speech topic is “Freedom of the Press: What does it mean?”  Each student was required to give a speech no longer that ten minutes and no shorter than five minutes. All three speakers emphasized the fundamental importance of freedom of press in a democratic society illustrating their talk with poignant quotes and examples. They also provided examples of dictatorial and autocratic societies in which the government denies freedom of the press. In his succinct speech, Harner addressed the current controversy about “fake news.”

Melissa Madden, activities director at Burney High School, helped to coach the students in preparation for their speeches.

Lion Dr. Bill Cummings officiated the contest. Charlene Charlene Sickler, Sally and Rodney Armstrong, and Jill Barnett served as judges. After all of the scores were tabulated, Dr. Cummings announced the winner.

Lion Dr. Bill Cummings announced that Cade Harner is the winner

All three participants were awarded certificates and presented with a check by Lion George Chapman. Harner won $100 for first place. The other speakers each received $25.

Lion George Chapman and Student Speakers Cade Harner, Parris Deaton Geisler, and Noah Bishop

The Club level contest is the first level of completion in the 82nd Annual Lions Multiple District Four Contest. Harner will now advance to the Zone level contest.

Lions Clubs throughout California and Nevada are holding club level contests during the month of February. Winners will advance through several levels to reach the District, Area, and Multiple District Four Contest.

Altogether, the Lions Fourth District Student Speakers Foundation will provide scholarships totaling $103,500.00. Fifteen District winners will each receive a $4,500 scholarship. Four Area winners will each receive an additional $6,500 scholarship, and the winner of the Multiple District Four Contest will receive an additional $10,000.00 scholarship.

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Filed under Burney, Burney Lions Club, youth

Grants available from Shasta Regional Community Foundation

On Monday, February 18, Amanda Hutchings, Program Officer for Shasta Regional Community Foundation sent the following notice to Nonprofit Partners in Shasta County:

“We have heard from a number of you in Shasta County that you have experienced a heavy impact on services or a loss of revenue or donations because of the Carr Fire. With this in mind, we have restructured The McConnell Fund a bit this funding cycle to provide a grant opportunity to offer operating support through a Safety Net program.  Organizational requests ranging from $5,000 – $15,000 will be considered and must be able to demonstrate need in accordance with the guidelines.”

Grant applications and guidelines can be found on the SRCF  website at www.shastarcf.org/grants. The deadline for applications via the online system is March 13 at 5:00 p.m.

Traditional funding opportunity of The McConnell Fund to provide for capital and/or equipment expenditures is also still available. The deadline for these applications is also March 13.

Two other grants available through SRCF with a March deadline are:

  1. The Burney Regional Community Fund that was established to address the needs within the communities of the Greater Burney Region. Grants from this fund are awarded to nonprofit organizations in the region through a competitive process. The deadline for applications is March 6.
  2.  The Redding Rancheria Community fund established by the Redding Rancheria, a federally recognized Tribe whose members are of Pit River, Yana and Wintu decent. This fund was established to give to worthy causes in the surrounding communities. The deadline for applications is March 27.

Other grants available include:

  1. The Animal Welfare Endowment Fund created to provide for the care of animals in Shasta and Siskiyou Counties.  As the fund grows, grants will be made to nonprofit organizations who promote animal welfare such as support for: rabies clinics, spay and neuter services, animal rescue, animal rehabilitation and more. The 2019 deadline has not yet been announced. The window for applications is April until the deadline sometime in June.
  2. Community Arts Endowment Fund that began in 2010 as the Articipate Campaign and is now the Community Arts Endowment Fund at the Shasta Regional Community Foundation. The fund allows grants for the presentation and creation of “new artistic work” to be given in support of artists and art projects such as visual public art, murals and sculptures, and other graphic art forms displayed or presented in public areas in Shasta and Siskiyou counties. The window for applications is April until the deadline sometime in June.
  3. The Women’s Fund of the Shasta Regional Community Foundation began in February 2008 with a founding cabinet of 10 women, representing diverse backgrounds, ages, and perspectives, all from the greater Redding region. The Deadline for applications is September 4, 2019 with an Application Window from  June until the Deadline Date.

Information about Shasta Regional Community organization and all of these funds can be found on the SRCF website https://www.shastarcf.org/. In addition to applying for grants, organizations and individuals who want to support the work of all of these funds are encouraged to contribute.

SRCF has also established a Community Disaster Relief Fund that has been enabled to receive donations for those in the North State impacted by the Carr Fire. The fund focuses on both the short and long-term recovery.

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Filed under Shasta Regional Community Foundation

Ray Berry’s great granddaughter appears in play about Ray Berry’s Radium Girls case

Dena Transeau

Raymond Berry’s great granddaughter, Dena Transeau, is currently appearing in a play in Frederick Maryland, “Radium Girls,” about a case that Ray Berry litigated in New Jersey in the 1920’s.

Raymond Berry played a major role in Burney history from the 1940’s into the early 1970’s. As an attorney for the Starr family he came to Burney to assess timber properties which the Starr family estate owned. In the 1940’s he moved to Burney, helped to incorporate the Scott Lumber Company, and served as its general manager for nearly three decades. During that time he also helped start the Burney Chamber of Commerce, negotiate the extension of the McCloud railroad into Burney, and start Shasta County Bank that later  merged with Tri-Counties Bank.

Before he came to Burney however, he represented a number of young ladies in the late 1920’s who had worked for the United Radium Company in New Jersey. The case is considered a landmark case in labor, women’s rights, and class action law.

The young women painted the numbers on watch dials with small brushes. They were encouraged by their employers to lick the tips of the brushes with their tongues. After a period of time many of them became seriously ill from radiation poisoning. Some of them glowed in the dark. Some died.

Dena as a radium girl

No one would take the case because the corporations were so powerful and many thought that the statute of limitations had passed. In a last ditch effort, one of the girls found a young Yale-educated lawyer who agreed to take the case. He established that the statute of limitations did not begin until the cause of the illnesses had been established and succeeded in winning a substantial settlement for five of the victims.

The case was well known in labor law history but not widely publicized in popular culture until the last few decades. The play “Radium Girls” was written in 1999 by D. W. Gregory and has become a popular play for youth drama. In 2018, it was named one of the ten most popular plays for high school drama. Gregory lives in Silver Spring Maryland and visited Frederick to offer advise on the production of the play.

Dena plays several characters in the play – one of the girls who dies, and also Katherine Wiley, executive director of the New Jersey Consumer’s League who helps the girls. She leaks the story to the press, creating public outrage, and finds a lawyer Ray Berry to take the case.

Dena Transeau as Katherine Wiley

The director  Gerard Stropnicky is quoted in an article in  the Frederick News-Post as saying, “It kind of makes my hair stand on end when I watch you, carrying that DNA, making the character that is your great-grandfather the full success that he becomes.”

“What’s interesting is that the Raymond Berry in this play, when we first meet him, is kind of clumsy, and he’s kind of a terrible lawyer,” Stropnicky said. “But Ms. Wiley, who Dena plays, builds him into becoming the lawyer who wins the case by the end of the second act.”

In 2016, a British author Kate Moore also published a book, The Radium Girls: They Paid with Their Lives. The Final Fight Was for Justice. In 2017, I also talked with a producer who was making a movie about the radium girls and another who was producing a documentary.

Incidentally, Dena was married last September in the theatre where she is performing. She had planned to be married on the beach in North Carolina but the location was changed at the last minute when a hurricane hit the Outer Banks. Her casting in the play came about as a result of the hasty change in venue.

Dena Transeau (nee Colvin) is the granddaughter of Ray Berry’s eldest daughter Alice B. Stone, and the daughter of Alex and Linda Colvin who live in Burney.

See also

Case argued by Raymond H. Berry featured in new book by British author

Texas School Girl does National History Day project on “Radium Girl” cases

Baltimore, bicycle riders, Radium Girls, and Ray Berry

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Filed under Burney, Pit River Area History

Estate planning clinic at Circle of Friends February 22

On Friday, February 22, 2019 at 1 p.m, Legal Services of Northern California’s Rural Senior Project Coordinator, Shah’ada Shaban, will host a presentation followed by a hands-on, one-on-one estate planning clinic for persons eligible for LSNC’s services at Circle of Friends,  36987 Main Street, Burney, CA 96013

Has your provider encouraged you to prepare a health care directive? Do you want to prepare a will but do not know where to start? Have you been worried about Medi-Cal Estate Recovery? Do you have questions about whether you need a trust?

This presentation, for all age groups, will address:

  • Choosing between a will, trust, or other estate planning methods
  • Advanced Healthcare Directives, healthcare power of attorney, and DNRs
  •  Financial Power of Attorney—the risks and benefits
  • Updating or changing estate planning documents you already have

If you would like to attend Please R.S.V.P. with Circle of Friends 530-335-4222

People can contact Legal Services of Northern California at their Shasta Regional Office: 1370 West Street, Redding, CA 96001, 530-241-3565, http://www.lsnc.net

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Filed under Burney, Circle of Friends

Friends of Burney Falls State Park & Friends of Castle Crags State Park 2019 Annual Report

From Catherine Camp, President, McArthur Burney Falls Interpretive Association:

We are fortunate in our supporters and staff indeed. 2018 was challenging for so many of our friends and neighbors with fires and smoke for most of the summer months. Our parks remain beautiful and safe and your support has allowed us to maintain the interpretive and educational activities that are a part of many visitors experience.

McArthur-Burney Falls Memorial State Park

Visitor Center and Interpretive Activities

The Visitor Center, open April through October, continues to be an inviting stop for many visitors to the park, more than 20,000 in 2018. The Center provides displays and hands-on activities about the geology, animal and plant life and cultural history of the area. In addition, weather and daily interpretive activities are displayed and hard-working camp host volunteers help visitors plan their time in the Park. These hosts are knowledgeable about the park and, in many cases, have returned again and again. The Park’s Interpretive Association offers special thanks to Cheryl Fish, Dave and Gloria Peavy, Ed and Judy Adams, Mary Babin, Ozzie and Theda Neighbours, Randy and Kathy Van Noort, Rick and Carol Pate and Mike and Gwen Coleman. The Park experience would not be the same without these folks who love the park!

Visits to the Park begin at the entrance kiosk with the annual Visitor Guide that provides park history, a park map and information about interpretive and program activities. The Park Association, Friends of Burney Falls, funds the production of the newspaper.

26 canoe trips, funded by the Kelly’s Wishes Foundation and the Association, took nearly 300 visitors on tours of Lake Britton, with opportunities to see turtles, otters, eagles and other abundant bird species. Thanks to the Foundation, we were able to add two new canoes this year, and hope that we can expand the number of these very popular guided trips.

Bird walks are now a regular park activity, thanks to viewing telescopes and binoculars provided by The McConnell Foundation and Kelly’s Wishes Foundation. The local Wintu Audubon Society helped the Park update its bird list, and led a Society walk in the spring. They were just in time to see the arrival of the Black Swifts that nest in the falls, along with warblers, vireos, chickadees, woodpeckers, swallows and mergansers. The park was also hosting an active eagle nest and an osprey nest with two chicks during this late May walk. Organized bird walks served nearly 30 visitors; in addition, ten individuals checked out binoculars for their own exploration and additional visitors used the small bird and native plant library in the Visitor Center.

The Park offers a self-guided Discovery Challenge program, printed in the Visitor Guide. Over 1500 visitors completed the challenge and were awarded the 2018 Discovery Challenge embroidered patch of Burney Falls. In addition, the formal Junior Ranger program offers the opportunity to participate in activities and crafts.

Regular interpretive activities include hikes, crafts, singalongs, interpretingo games and Dutch oven cooking demonstrations. Campfire presentations are as much a part of camping here as marshmallows: 13 campfire evenings included four presentations by Shasta Wildlife Rescue & Rehabilitation, giving campers a chance to see and learn about live owls, hawks and eagles. This year, Camp Host Ed Adams created a new presentation, StarWatch, giving campers a tour of the heavens through telescopes. StarWatch was held on 5 nights in the summer, but despite its popularity, it was cancelled in August due to the smoke from nearby fires.

Interpretive staff provided ten presentations to school groups who visited the Park during the year. Nearly 500 youngsters walked the trails, explored the plant and animal life, and learned some of the history of the area.

Heritage Day

Nearly 1000 Park visitors enjoyed Heritage Day in October. This community event explores life in the 1870s in the Intermountain area. Local volunteers share their history and expertise with Mountain Man exhibits of tools and implements and opportunities to participate in candle-making, beading, weaving, pine-doll making, cross-cut sawing, branding wood discs, rope-making and target knife-throwing. Attendees made fresh apple juice with a hand-cranked press and helped prepare Dutch oven apple crisp. The day was enlivened with the music of Old Time Fiddlers and wagon rides with Wagon Ponies.

In addition to the individuals who share their skills, the Burney Lions Club, Leos Youth Organization and Rotary Club of Burney-Fall River provided parking assistance, food sales and the staffing of numerous activity booths. Many community folks have been helping put this heritage-themed day on for more than 30 years.

Castle Crags State Park

Castle Crags State Park suffered extensively from nearby wildfires this year, and was closed for many days due to smoke. In addition, park staff were called upon to assist in the fire suppression tasks, and Interstate 5 was closed for an extended period of time.

Despite this shortened time, the Association provided a Visitor Guide to 8000 park visitors. The Park provided 10 evening programs and awarded more than 250 Discovery Patches to campers and day visitors who completed the nature challenge. The remodeled gift store area provided visitors with opportunities to enrich their visit, and the funds from this activity, along with the sale of firewood and recycling, supported the educational and interpretive activities.

Social Media

More than 300,000 visits were logged in to www.BurneyFallsPark.org this year. The web site has continued to add content to support visitor experience in the Park.

Castle Crags State Park now has its own website, established this past year. The site logged 4,000 visits this year. Take a look at the activities and sights at http://www.CastleCragsPark.org

We also publish a periodic e-newsletter to keep our park friends up-to-date on the latest happenings at both Burney Falls and Castle Crags State Park. If you would like to receive the newsletter, please let us know at either web site above.

Financial Report

In spite of the months of fires and smoke that reduced park visitation, we had a very good year. Gross revenues of $89,364 included generous donations from the Delong-Sweet and the Kelly’s Wishes Foundations.

54% percent of 2018 revenue supported:

  • Interpretive Program expenses (36%)
  • Administrative costs (5%)
  • Restricted and rollover funds for 2019 (13%)

46% of 2018 revenue provided purchase of Visitor Center sales merchandise and the firewood production

Distribution of Net Revenues of $47,915

Firewood and Visitor Center Sales provided over half of the net revenue at 61% of funds earned, returning profits of 44% and 38% respectively. Recycling, advertisement sales, donations and foundation grants provided the other remainder revenue.

Distribution of Interpretive Program Expenditures -$31,747

  • Printing of the Visitor Guides for both parks – 20%
    Contribution to Park Interpretive Specialist position – 47%
  • Supplies for interpretive activities: hikes & canoe excursions, bird walks, campfire talks, discovery Quest Challenge & Junior Ranger and school presentations. – 15%
  • Volunteer Support for camp hosts and recycling programs – 3%
  • Heritage Day Festival including activity supplies for candle making, saw bucking and branding, Dutch oven cooking & apple pressing; wagon rides and Old Time Fiddlers. – 10%
  •  Canoe program repair and purchase of new canoes – 5%

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Filed under Archaeology, Burney Falls