Tag Archives: Montgomery Creek

Harvest Carnival at Montgomery Creek Elementary coming October 27

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October 7, 2017 · 9:13 pm

Hope is Alive! at Billy’s Roadside Cafe

About 50 people gathered at Billy’s Roadside Café in Montgomery Creek on Friday evening October 6 to hear poets and musicians share a message of hope and inspiration.

The program was sponsored by Stand Against Stigma, funded by Shasta County Health and Human Services to address issues associated with mental illness and to provide suicide prevention services. The Hope is Alive! open mics celebrate the theme of healing through  performance arts.  The gathering in Montgomery Creek was the fourth Hope is Alive open mic in the Intermountain Area and the 12th in Shasta County at large.

Marc Dadigan, community education specialist for the Shasta County Health and Human Services Agency, emceed the event. The evening performances began with a performance by Randy and Verena Compton followed by the talented Billy Riggins who share some of his original rap music.

Billy Riggins uplifts the audience with his original poetic rap

Mental illness is often associated with substance abuse.

Larry Harris from Redding shares several poignant poems

Poet Larry Harris from Redding shared three poems of personal experience describing the struggles and victory that his family experienced through their daughter’s bout with mental illness. It was a tale of hope prevailing over despair.

After a period of substance abuse resulting in mental breakdown, his daughter successfully went through therapy and recovery and now leads a successful happy life as an actress.

In one particularly poignant poem, Harris talked about his daughter going to a Simon and Garfunkle concert in San Francisco on her own after rehab. Harris shared the emotion a parent goes through as he experiences the restoration of trust, letting go and watching his child emerge as a happy independent young woman.

Michael Bennett and Kimberly Michelle Davis from the Circle of Friends in Burney both sang songs. Bennett charmed people with an a capella rendering of Mac Davis “Oh Lord it’s Hard to be Humble.” Ms. Davis once again delighted the audience as she sang Broadway show tunes in her lovely soprano voice.

A young lady who had traveled two hours to attend got up and recited a short poem.

A highlight of the evening was the personal testimony of David Martinez, a spokesman for Stand Against Stigma’s Brave Faces who has suffered from depression, anxiety and PTSD. Mr. Martinez is a member of the Wintu tribe. He has been a biker, a cowboy and an EMT for the fire department. He has also worked in Redding as a substance abuse counselor. After sharing his story, Martinez shared two popular songs, “Pancho and Lefty,” and “City of New Orleans”.

A testimony and two songs from an elder

Singer-songwriter Mauro livened things up with several of his original songs.

Mauro sings some soul stirring originals

Next, the audience was treated to a performance of Native American Rap by Louis Gustafson and his family. As well as singing, Gustafson also plays bass and performs with Pit Crew. He also is a wonderful drummer who performed at the 2015 Burney Basin Days with the Pit River Nation Drum Group.

Louis Gustafson and his family performing Native American rap

The evening was closed out by Alex Colvin and George Whitfield. Colvin opened with a poem “In This World of Heart and Mind” expressing the healing power of love and then sang “Live for Others.” Alex and George then sang “Ghost Riders in the Sky” together.

Before singing two songs,  “Sounds of Silence” and “Vietnam Song.” George talked about the seriousness of mental illness and suicide plaguing our country. Seventeen veterans die every day from suicide.

“Don’t let stigma stand in your way,” Whitman said, “If you feel like your life is going to pieces, reach out for help.”

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Filed under Art, Hope is Alive!, Mental Health, Montgomery Creek, Pit River Tribe

Fort Crook Lodge 250 give backpacks to second graders

Over the past week, Masons Jim Crockett and George Whitfield from Fort Crook Lodge 250 F&AM  delivered more than 100 backpacks to second graders in the Intermountain area.

George Whitfield and Jim Crockett passing out backpacks at Burney Elementary as teacher Michael von Schalscha and school psychologist Brent Beyer look on

On Friday, August 18 they delivered 12 backpacks to students in Montgomery Creek.

Montgomery Creek (Photo courtesy of Jim Crockett)

On Tuesday August 22, they gave out about 40 backpacks at Fall River Elementary School

and another 40 at Burney Elementary School.

Burney Elementary (Photo courtesy of Jim Crockett)

Then on Thursday August 24, they drove to Big Valley to deliver another 17 back packs to grateful children.

Big Valley (Photo courtesy of Jim Crockett)

This is the 16th year that Fort Crook Lodge 250 has done this program. Each backpack contained a ruler, a composition book, pencils, crayons, and erasers.

At each school, Crockett and Whitfield gave a short presentation before presenting the backpacks.

Crockett and Whitfield explain about the Masons

For instance, at Burney Elementary, the children listened attentively as Master Mason Jim Crockett spoke about the history of the Masons. He told them that this year is the 300th anniversary of Freemasonry.

George Whitfield asked if any of the children had heard of George Washington and explained that George Washington and Benjamin Franklin were both Masons.

To help the children understand the Masons in their own terms, second grade teacher Joy Ford told the children that “the Masons are a club like the Boy Scouts, only for adults.”

Joy Ford helped the students to understand the Masons

The children appreciated the explanation and nodded and smiled.

The three core principles of Freemasonry are brotherly love, relief, and truth.

Mason George Whitfield shakes hands with a young student as he hands him a backpack

After hearing that the Masons were 300 years old, one young boy raised his hand and asked Mr. Crockett, “How old are you.”

“Older than George,” he replied.

“And I’m too old to be asked that question,” Mr. Whitfield quipped as the children laughed.

When questions were finished, all the children lined up in two orderly rows and advanced to share a friendly handshake and receive their pack.

Master Mason Crockett said, “We truly enjoy the kids and their expressions and gratitude in receiving the backpacks with the school supplies inside.”

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Filed under Bieber, Big Valley, Burney, Fall River, Fall River Mills, Montgomery Creek, Schools, youth

PG&E flying low in Eastern Shasta County to check for drought-stricken trees

REDDING, Calif. – Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) will fly low by helicopter in the mountains of eastern Shasta County on Wednesday and Thursday (Feb. 22 and 23) to check for drought-stricken trees near power lines.

Flights will occur over the communities of Big Bend, Round Mountain, Oak Run, Montgomery Creek and Whitmore.

Residents are advised that the helicopter will fly low – about 200 to 300 feet – along distribution power lines.

PG&E is using a contract helicopter service to fly foresters to check for trees weakened by the drought. This patrol is in addition to the annual patrols PG&E conducts along power lines to identify trees and vegetation in need of pruning and removal. Weakened trees and branches can fall into power lines, leading to outages and even wild land fires.

The drought has weakened and killed many trees and left others susceptible to disease or insects. After the flights, foresters will hike to the trees in question for a closer inspection to verify tree conditions. Once a forester confirms a tree needs to be removed, PG&E will work with the property owner to schedule a contractor to cut the tree.

Consecutive years of drought have taken a toll on trees and even some trees deemed healthy six months ago have since succumbed to the dry conditions.

The U.S. Forest Service recently identified an exponentially growing rate of tree mortality in California. In 2014, 11 million dead trees were identified throughout the state. That number grew to 40 million in 2015 and 102 million in 2016.

While tree mortality is more serious in 10 counties in the southern and central Sierra Nevada region, the Forest Service also identified increasing mortality in the northern part of the state.

Weather permitting, flights will occur between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m.

 

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Filed under Big Bend, Montgomery Creek, PG&E

PG&E Checking in Shasta County for Drought-stricken Trees

The following is a press release from PG&E dated December 5. The initial import of the release is to notify and explain to residents of Round Mountain, Montgomery Creek, and Big Bend the reasons that helicopters would be flying low over their areas on Tuesday, December 7.

The release gives details about the growing number of trees that have died as a result of the drought or are threatened by insects and disease as a result of weakened resistance. After the aerial check, foresters will follow up on foot to inspect trees. Then private landowners will be contacted. Dead or infected trees will need to be trimmed or removed.

Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) will be flying low by helicopter in Shasta County on Tuesday to check for drought-stricken trees near power lines. Flights will occur over Round Mountain, Montgomery Creek and Big Bend.

Residents are advised that the helicopter will fly low – about 200 to 300 feet – along distribution power lines.

PG&E is using a contract helicopter service to fly foresters to check for trees weakened by the drought. This patrol is in addition to the annual patrols PG&E does along power lines to identify trees and vegetation in need of pruning and removal. Weakened trees and branches can fall into power lines, leading to outages and even wild land fires.

The drought has weakened and killed many trees and left others susceptible to disease or insects.  After the flights, foresters will hike to the trees in question for an up-close inspection to verify tree conditions.  Once a forester confirms a tree needs to be removed, PG&E will work with the property owner to schedule a contractor to cut the tree.

Consecutive years of drought have taken a toll on trees and even some trees deemed healthy six months ago have since succumbed to the dry conditions. The U.S. Forest Service recently identified an exponentially growing rate of tree mortality in California.  In 2014, 11 million dead trees were identified throughout the state. That number grew to 40 million in 2015 and 102 million in 2016.

While tree mortality is more serious in 10 counties in the southern and central Sierra Nevada Mountain region, the Forest Service also identified increasing mortality in the northern part of the state.

Weather permitting, all flights will occur between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m.B>>

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Filed under Big Bend, Montgomery Creek, PG&E, Pit River, Round Mountain, Timber and Forestry

Harvest Creek Carnival at Montgomery Creek School

harvest-carnival

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October 19, 2016 · 4:24 pm

Safety kits, live radio and training available for Walk to School Day

Shasta County – The Safe Routes to School program is offering safety kits and technical assistance to Shasta County schools for coordinating Walk to School Day on October 5, 2016. Kits include educational materials, vests, cones and promotional materials. One lucky school will win a live radio remote on their campus to celebrate Walk to School Day. Interested PTA/parent groups or schools are invited to submit applications by 5 pm on Thursday, September 1.

To be eligible, schools are encouraged to have volunteers from Parent-Teacher Association (PTA), a parent club or site council willing to coordinate the event, and lead weekly walks to school throughout October.

Last year, 14 local schools participated in International Walk to School Day. The goal of the Safe Routes to School Program is to make walking and biking to school safer, easier, more convenient and increase the numbers of children walking or biking to school safely.

“Walking and biking to school is a great way for children to get exercise before starting their school day, making them more prepared to concentrate and learn when they arrive at school,” said Sara Sundquist, Safe Routes to School Program Coordinator. “When more students walk, the number of vehicles around the school area is reduced, making it safer for more children to walk or bike.”

For more information or for an application, call at 245-6457 or visit www.healthyshasta.org.

Healthy Shasta is a partnership committed to making healthy eating and physical activity choices easier where you live, work and play. Visit http://www.healthyshasta.org for more information.

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Filed under Schools