Tag Archives: Native American

Pit River Health Opening Outreach Center in Alturas

Click on image to enlarge

Pit River Health Service, Inc. (PRHS) will be holding a Grand Opening for a new behavioral health and outreach center in Alturas on Monday, November 26 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. The public is invited to attend. Refreshments will be served. For more information call Denise 335-5090.

Pit River Health Service, Inc.(PRHS) is a non-profit ambulatory health clinic established in 1979. The purpose of PRHS is to serve the community with a primary focus on the Native American population. PRHS offers medical, dental, and behavioral health services, as well as providing transportation, outreach, and senior nutrition services.

PRHS has two clinics, one is located at the base of the Burney Mountain in Burney and the other is located on the Pit River Tribal reservation in Alturas. The clinics are open to Native and non-Native patients and accept Medi-Cal, Partnership, Medicare, and most private insurances.

PRHS mission statement is:

“To provide the highest quality healthcare services to our patients making all possible efforts to raise the standards of healthcare for our tribal members and others we serve”

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Alturas, Burney, health, Pit River Tribe

Third Annual California Tribal TANF Partnership Open House Dec. 27

Leave a comment

Filed under Burney

California Native American Day Celebrated at Pit River Casino

On Friday afternoon September 28, Pit River Casino hosted a special celebration of California Indian Day for the Burney and Intermountain community. The event featured a chili cook off and fry bread contest, a delicious barbecue lunch courtesy of the casino’s River Rock Grill, a horseshoe contest, a fun play area for the kids, Native American drumming and singing, and dancing by the RISE youth dancers.

RISE Youth Dancers from Alturas

In 1968, Governor Ronald Reagan signed a resolution calling for a holiday called American Indian Day, to be held the Fourth Friday in September. In 1998, the California Assembly passed AB 1953, which made Native American Day an official state holiday, observed annually on the fourth Friday in September.

California has more than 100 recognized Native American tribes, representing a diverse cultural heritage extending back over thousands of years. The Pit River basin is the home of the Achomawi people.

Activities began in the early afternoon with a chili cook-off and fry bread contest. June Avelar won the chili cook-off and Lavenna won the fry bread contest. Each winner received a prize of $150. Lavenna, from Ganado, Arizona, is a member of the Navaho nation who is visiting the area.

Chili cook-off winner June Avelar and Fry bread winner Lavenna

The River Rock Grill also provided a delicious buffet lunch including tri-tips, chicken, mini-tacos, chili, potato salad, pasta salad, and apple crisp.

Lining up for a delicious lunch

Mike Avelar said he knew that at least 200 attended, because the casino gave out over 200 free t-shirts to commemorate the event. Many more people came who did not go to receive a t-shirt.

In addition to the food booths, Pauline Nez, had a display of beautiful hand-crafted Navaho jewelry for sale.

Throughout the afternoon children enjoyed playing in a fun area.

Fun for the kids

Later in the afternoon there was horseshoe contest with an entry fee of $20 per team. The casino added another $100 and the winning team won all.

About 3 o’clock, visitors were treated to superb drumming and singing by Thoz Womenz. The group of women drummers and singers is directed by April Goforth, director of Resources for Indian Student Education (RISE) in Alturas.

Drumming and singing by Thoz Womens

The drumming group is made up of professional women educators and medical personnel. The group began in Alturas. Since that time some of the members have moved to other locations throughout Northern California, but they continue to come together to drum and sing.

One of the drummers introduced Mr. Jimenez, a Pomo Indian dancer, and seven young RISE dancers who had come for the celebration.

Grass dance

After several songs and dances by Thoz Womenz and RISE youth, local children were invited to join in a Tiny Tot dance.

Tiny tots join the dancers

Casino Manager Mike Avelar said that they hosted the event to “celebrate and to show appreciation to our customers.”

Later in the evening beginning at 6 p.m. the Casino also hosted a Tough Man Boxing Tournament.

Leave a comment

Filed under Burney, Pit River Casino, Pit River Country Events, Pit River Tribe, youth

Pit River Health Service holds appreciation barbecue

Pit River Health Service, Inc. (PRHS) held an appreciation barbecue at the Veterans Hall in Burney on Friday, June 29 to recognize and thank all who were involved in helping achieve accreditation from the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care (AAAHC). About 50 people, including board members, administrators, staff and health care providers attended.

Glenna Moore gives a slide show reviewing the process and congratulating all involved

The program began with a slide presentation by Glenna Moore, Executive Director of PRHS. Ms. Moore explained the detailed process they had gone through to meet all of the high standards required for accreditation.

The journey involved extensive self-assessment and on-site survey by AAAHC expert surveyors – physicians, nurses, and administrators who are actively involved in ambulatory health care. The survey is consultative and educational, designed to help clinics achieve the highest standard of care for their patients. Ms. Moore thanked and congratulated everyone present for their hard work.

Executive Director Glenna Moore recounting the journey to excellence

Following the slide show, Laurie Hayward, Health Board Chairperson, spoke of the compassion and commitment that contributed to success.

“I am so proud of you,” she said. “We worked together as a team, a clinic, and a community. We would not be here if you did not have compassion for your job.”

Certificates of appreciation had been prepared for all who participated. Executive Director Moore presented Betty George, Treasurer of the Board, with a beautiful blanket in appreciation of her work. Other members of the Board are: Denise Winn Wright, Vice Chairperson; Louise Davis, Board Secretary; and Lester ‘Wayne’ Gibbs.

Betty George thanked for her service

Chairperson Hayward then presented Glenna Moore with a certificate and a purse.

Laurie Hayward, Denise Petersen, and Glenna Moore

After the presentation of certificates, there was a cake cutting ceremony.

Celebrating excellence and achievement

Board members posed for a commemorative picture,

Board members standing by motto and cake

and Chairperson Hayward cut the cake.

Board members standing by motto and cake

Tribal elder Jessica Jim and Administrative Assistant Denise Petersen also shared in the celebration of compassion, commitment, and community.

Leave a comment

Filed under Burney, health, Pit River Tribe

California Tribal TANF Partnership holding Open House December 8

The California Tribal TANF Partnership (CTTP) will be holding an Open House on December 8 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at their Burney office at 37106 Main Street Suite 2. The office is located next to Zito Media behind the office of Dr. Fred Jones.

December 8 is the second anniversary of the opening of the Burney site. The public is invited to come learn about the vision and mission of CTTP, the services that they offer, and their accomplishments.

The California Tribal TANF Partnership (CTTP) is associated with 20 tribes and other organizations that operate tribal Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) programs for Native American people. CTTP was established on July 8, 2003 and remains operational under the governing body Robinson Rancheria of Pomo Indians as lead administrators.

The four stated purposes of TANF are

  • provide assistance for needy families so that children may be cared for in their homes
  • Reduce the dependency of needy persons by promoting job preparation, work and marriage
  • Prevent out-of-wedlock pregnancies
  • Encourage the formation and maintenance of two-parent families

For more information call 530-335-5586

Leave a comment

Filed under Burney

Hope is Alive! at Billy’s Roadside Cafe

About 50 people gathered at Billy’s Roadside Café in Montgomery Creek on Friday evening October 6 to hear poets and musicians share a message of hope and inspiration.

The program was sponsored by Stand Against Stigma, funded by Shasta County Health and Human Services to address issues associated with mental illness and to provide suicide prevention services. The Hope is Alive! open mics celebrate the theme of healing through  performance arts.  The gathering in Montgomery Creek was the fourth Hope is Alive open mic in the Intermountain Area and the 12th in Shasta County at large.

Marc Dadigan, community education specialist for the Shasta County Health and Human Services Agency, emceed the event. The evening performances began with a performance by Randy and Verena Compton followed by the talented Billy Riggins who share some of his original rap music.

Billy Riggins uplifts the audience with his original poetic rap

Mental illness is often associated with substance abuse.

Larry Harris from Redding shares several poignant poems

Poet Larry Harris from Redding shared three poems of personal experience describing the struggles and victory that his family experienced through their daughter’s bout with mental illness. It was a tale of hope prevailing over despair.

After a period of substance abuse resulting in mental breakdown, his daughter successfully went through therapy and recovery and now leads a successful happy life as an actress.

In one particularly poignant poem, Harris talked about his daughter going to a Simon and Garfunkle concert in San Francisco on her own after rehab. Harris shared the emotion a parent goes through as he experiences the restoration of trust, letting go and watching his child emerge as a happy independent young woman.

Michael Bennett and Kimberly Michelle Davis from the Circle of Friends in Burney both sang songs. Bennett charmed people with an a capella rendering of Mac Davis “Oh Lord it’s Hard to be Humble.” Ms. Davis once again delighted the audience as she sang Broadway show tunes in her lovely soprano voice.

A young lady who had traveled two hours to attend got up and recited a short poem.

A highlight of the evening was the personal testimony of David Martinez, a spokesman for Stand Against Stigma’s Brave Faces who has suffered from depression, anxiety and PTSD. Mr. Martinez is a member of the Wintu tribe. He has been a biker, a cowboy and an EMT for the fire department. He has also worked in Redding as a substance abuse counselor. After sharing his story, Martinez shared two popular songs, “Pancho and Lefty,” and “City of New Orleans”.

A testimony and two songs from an elder

Singer-songwriter Mauro livened things up with several of his original songs.

Mauro sings some soul stirring originals

Next, the audience was treated to a performance of Native American Rap by Louis Gustafson and his family. As well as singing, Gustafson also plays bass and performs with Pit Crew. He also is a wonderful drummer who performed at the 2015 Burney Basin Days with the Pit River Nation Drum Group.

Louis Gustafson and his family performing Native American rap

The evening was closed out by Alex Colvin and George Whitfield. Colvin opened with a poem “In This World of Heart and Mind” expressing the healing power of love and then sang “Live for Others.” Alex and George then sang “Ghost Riders in the Sky” together.

Before singing two songs,  “Sounds of Silence” and “Vietnam Song.” George talked about the seriousness of mental illness and suicide plaguing our country. Seventeen veterans die every day from suicide.

“Don’t let stigma stand in your way,” Whitman said, “If you feel like your life is going to pieces, reach out for help.”

Leave a comment

Filed under Art, Hope is Alive!, Mental Health, Montgomery Creek, Pit River Tribe

Shasta county indigenous leaders, and youth to share lessons from standing rock

Press release from Indigenous Peoples’ Day – Shasta County
Click on image to enlarge

Click on image to enlarge

Redding, Calif. – At the FREE “Standing Rock Comes Home” community forum, Shasta County indigenous leaders, educators and youth will discuss their experiences visiting the Standing Rock spiritual camp in North Dakota where indigenous people and supporters have resisted the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline. They will also discuss “local DAPLs”, big projects such as the proposed raise of Shasta Dam and Medicine Lake geothermal plants that would damage or flood sacred sites and could risk further contamination of the state’s water supply.

The forum will be held 3-5 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 28 at the United Methodist Church community room, 1825 East St., in Redding. Following the panel discussion, there will be a potluck dinner and musical performances by Native American hip hop artists, spoken word poets and local folk rock artists Feral Tortie.

Panelists will include:

  • Mickey Gemmill Jr, Chairman of the Pit River Tribe
  • Rod Lindsay, Director of the Local Indians for Education Center in the City of Shasta Lake
  • Jack Potter, Chairman of the Redding Rancheria
  • Caleen Sisk, Traditional Chief and Spiritual Leader of the Winnemem Wintu

The Dakota Access Pipeline would extend 1,168 miles across many states including North Dakota to carry crude oil from the Bakken oil fields to Illinois, where it will link with another pipeline to transport oil to refineries along the Gulf of Mexico. Members of the Standing Rock Sioux, who say the pipeline violates their treaty as well as federal law and that a spill would threaten their water supply, began a spiritual resistance against the pipeline this summer that has brought international attention and support.

This event is organized by Indigenous Peoples’ Day – Shasta County, an organization of Native and non-Native people formed to respectfully promote an accurate and inclusive history of the United States, the West and Northern California that recognizes the humanity and vitality of Pre- and Post-colonial indigenous societies.

Leave a comment

Filed under Pit River Tribe