Tag Archives: Northern California

Cade Harner wins 2019 Burney Lions Club Student Speakers Contest

Sophomore Cade Harner won the 2019 Student Speakers Contest at the Burney Lions Hall on Thursday evening February 21. Harner competed against two other Burney High School students, Senior Noah Bishop and Junior Paris Deaton-Geisler.

Judges Rodney and Sally Armstrong, Jiill Barnett, Charlene Sickler, Coach Melissa Madden, Student Speakers Noah Bishop, Cade Harner, Paris Deaton Geisler, and Lion Dr. Bill Cummings

This year’s speech topic is “Freedom of the Press: What does it mean?”  Each student was required to give a speech no longer that ten minutes and no shorter than five minutes. All three speakers emphasized the fundamental importance of freedom of press in a democratic society illustrating their talk with poignant quotes and examples. They also provided examples of dictatorial and autocratic societies in which the government denies freedom of the press. In his succinct speech, Harner addressed the current controversy about “fake news.”

Melissa Madden, activities director at Burney High School, helped to coach the students in preparation for their speeches.

Lion Dr. Bill Cummings officiated the contest. Charlene Charlene Sickler, Sally and Rodney Armstrong, and Jill Barnett served as judges. After all of the scores were tabulated, Dr. Cummings announced the winner.

Lion Dr. Bill Cummings announced that Cade Harner is the winner

All three participants were awarded certificates and presented with a check by Lion George Chapman. Harner won $100 for first place. The other speakers each received $25.

Lion George Chapman and Student Speakers Cade Harner, Parris Deaton Geisler, and Noah Bishop

The Club level contest is the first level of completion in the 82nd Annual Lions Multiple District Four Contest. Harner will now advance to the Zone level contest.

Lions Clubs throughout California and Nevada are holding club level contests during the month of February. Winners will advance through several levels to reach the District, Area, and Multiple District Four Contest.

Altogether, the Lions Fourth District Student Speakers Foundation will provide scholarships totaling $103,500.00. Fifteen District winners will each receive a $4,500 scholarship. Four Area winners will each receive an additional $6,500 scholarship, and the winner of the Multiple District Four Contest will receive an additional $10,000.00 scholarship.

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Grants available from Shasta Regional Community Foundation

On Monday, February 18, Amanda Hutchings, Program Officer for Shasta Regional Community Foundation sent the following notice to Nonprofit Partners in Shasta County:

“We have heard from a number of you in Shasta County that you have experienced a heavy impact on services or a loss of revenue or donations because of the Carr Fire. With this in mind, we have restructured The McConnell Fund a bit this funding cycle to provide a grant opportunity to offer operating support through a Safety Net program.  Organizational requests ranging from $5,000 – $15,000 will be considered and must be able to demonstrate need in accordance with the guidelines.”

Grant applications and guidelines can be found on the SRCF  website at www.shastarcf.org/grants. The deadline for applications via the online system is March 13 at 5:00 p.m.

Traditional funding opportunity of The McConnell Fund to provide for capital and/or equipment expenditures is also still available. The deadline for these applications is also March 13.

Two other grants available through SRCF with a March deadline are:

  1. The Burney Regional Community Fund that was established to address the needs within the communities of the Greater Burney Region. Grants from this fund are awarded to nonprofit organizations in the region through a competitive process. The deadline for applications is March 6.
  2.  The Redding Rancheria Community fund established by the Redding Rancheria, a federally recognized Tribe whose members are of Pit River, Yana and Wintu decent. This fund was established to give to worthy causes in the surrounding communities. The deadline for applications is March 27.

Other grants available include:

  1. The Animal Welfare Endowment Fund created to provide for the care of animals in Shasta and Siskiyou Counties.  As the fund grows, grants will be made to nonprofit organizations who promote animal welfare such as support for: rabies clinics, spay and neuter services, animal rescue, animal rehabilitation and more. The 2019 deadline has not yet been announced. The window for applications is April until the deadline sometime in June.
  2. Community Arts Endowment Fund that began in 2010 as the Articipate Campaign and is now the Community Arts Endowment Fund at the Shasta Regional Community Foundation. The fund allows grants for the presentation and creation of “new artistic work” to be given in support of artists and art projects such as visual public art, murals and sculptures, and other graphic art forms displayed or presented in public areas in Shasta and Siskiyou counties. The window for applications is April until the deadline sometime in June.
  3. The Women’s Fund of the Shasta Regional Community Foundation began in February 2008 with a founding cabinet of 10 women, representing diverse backgrounds, ages, and perspectives, all from the greater Redding region. The Deadline for applications is September 4, 2019 with an Application Window from  June until the Deadline Date.

Information about Shasta Regional Community organization and all of these funds can be found on the SRCF website https://www.shastarcf.org/. In addition to applying for grants, organizations and individuals who want to support the work of all of these funds are encouraged to contribute.

SRCF has also established a Community Disaster Relief Fund that has been enabled to receive donations for those in the North State impacted by the Carr Fire. The fund focuses on both the short and long-term recovery.

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Dr. Daniel Dahle named 2019 “Country Doctor of the Year” by Staff Care

Press release from Staff Care, and AMN Healthcare company:

DALLAS, TX – Serving an area larger than five states and a community 45 miles from the nearest traffic light, Dr. Daniel Dahle is the medical version of a hero in a Clint Eastwood western, keeping the local citizens safe not with six shooters but with over three decades of medical expertise and an unflinching commitment to personalized care.

Dr. Dahle checking a heart

For his exceptional record of compassion and service, Dr. Dahle has been named 2019 Country Doctor of the Year.

Presented by Staff Care, an AMN Healthcare company, the Country Doctor of the Year Award recognizes the spirit, skill, and dedication of America’s rural medical practitioners. The leading temporary physician staffing firm in the United States, Staff Care has presented the national award since 1992 to exemplary physicians practicing in communities of 30,000 or less.

“Dr. Dahle is more than an outstanding primary care physician,” said Jeff Decker, President of Staff Care, “he is one of the pillars on which his community stands. The people, the health system, and the economy of his region simply could not do without him.”

Raised on a potato farm near the California/Oregon border, Daniel Dahle served as a medical corpsman in Vietnam before earning a Ph.D. in radiation biology and a medical degree at the University of Rochester in New York. In 1985, he elected to return to his home region and began practicing in Bieber, California, a frontier town of 300 people located in an isolated section of northeastern California, where he has continued to practice for 33 years.

The sole primary care physician in Bieber, Dr. Dahle is on staff at Big Valley Health Center, a Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC) that sees all patients, regardless of ability to pay. He draws patients from a service area that extends over 7,500 square miles, larger than Rhode Island, Delaware, Connecticut, Hawaii and New Jersey, and to a large extent has been personally responsible for maintaining health services in the region.

Dr. Dahle visiting a patient

In addition to seeing patients at the health center, Dr. Dahle drives 25 miles one way almost every day to see inpatients at Mayers Memorial Hospital in the town of Fall River Mills, where he also covers the emergency department and cares for long-term patients at the hospital’s nursing home. Over half the hospital’s inpatients are admitted by Dr. Dahle, and his presence in the community has been vital to the hospital’s continued viability.

“As a rural hospital goes, so goes the community,” Decker said. “Few people want to stay in or move to a place where there are no healthcare facilities. By supporting the local hospital, Dr. Dahle has done more than keep patients alive – he has kept the community alive.”

Dr. Dahle has delivered over 1,000 babies in his career, often under trying circumstances. Many of the residents in the local valleys, including much of the student body at Bieber’s high school where Dr. Dahle coached track for 25 years, were delivered by Dr. Dahle. His skills as a diagnostician are legendary, as one particularly telling incident illustrates. When a long-term patient and co-worker presented with pain and mental confusion, Dr. Dahle correctly diagnosed herpes encephalitis, despite encountering this rare condition only one previous time in approximately 350,000 patient encounters. The condition is commonly fatal, but by rushing the patient to a tertiary care center hours away and insisting on proper treatment, Dr. Dahle is credited with saving her life.

Not all of the duties that fall to a frontier doctor are strictly clinical. In one instance, Dr. Dahle was present when a knife wielding assailant attacked the local sheriff. Dr. Dahle was able to subdue the man with a forearm shiver. Most of his activities, however, are much more benign. One patient describes how Dr. Dahle was able to provide her dying husband with a last wish, personally escorting him on a scuba diving trip to Hawaii, while another relates how Dr. Dahle revived her newborn when the infant was not breathing. Virtually all of the town’s residents (including Clint Eastwood himself, who has a ranch in the area) have been positively impacted by him in one way or another.

Now aged 70 and contemplating retirement, Dr. Dahle has made educating future care givers part of his mission.   Each year he provides training to medical residents from the University of California, Davis as well as students from the physician assistant program at the University of Iowa. He is well known for sharing his “zebras” with students, medical slang for patients whose maladies are masked or otherwise difficult to diagnose.   Dr. Dahle is hoping to pass the torch on to a husband and wife duo who will soon be completing their medical training and who Dr. Dahle has been recruiting since the couple was in medical school.   Though he has seen rural practice evolve during his tenure, Dr. Dahle believes the essence remains the same.

“Much has changed in 30 years,” said Dr. Dahle, “but patients still respond to someone who really knows them and to someone who really cares.”

As the 2019 Country Doctor of the Year, Dr. Dahle will be able to enjoy two weeks of time off, as Staff Care will provide a temporary physician to fill in for him at no charge, a service valued at approximately $10,000. He also will receive the award’s signature plaque featuring a country doctor making his rounds on a horse and buggy, an engraved stethoscope, and a monogrammed lab coat. Additional information about the Country Doctor of the Year Award can be found at www.countrydoctoraward.com.

About Staff Care and AMN Healthcare
Staff Care is the nation’s leading temporary physician staffing firm and is a company of AMN Healthcare (NYSE: AMN) the largest healthcare workforce solutions company in the United States . For more information, visit www.staffcare.com or www.amnhealthcare.com.

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Friends of Burney Falls State Park & Friends of Castle Crags State Park 2019 Annual Report

From Catherine Camp, President, McArthur Burney Falls Interpretive Association:

We are fortunate in our supporters and staff indeed. 2018 was challenging for so many of our friends and neighbors with fires and smoke for most of the summer months. Our parks remain beautiful and safe and your support has allowed us to maintain the interpretive and educational activities that are a part of many visitors experience.

McArthur-Burney Falls Memorial State Park

Visitor Center and Interpretive Activities

The Visitor Center, open April through October, continues to be an inviting stop for many visitors to the park, more than 20,000 in 2018. The Center provides displays and hands-on activities about the geology, animal and plant life and cultural history of the area. In addition, weather and daily interpretive activities are displayed and hard-working camp host volunteers help visitors plan their time in the Park. These hosts are knowledgeable about the park and, in many cases, have returned again and again. The Park’s Interpretive Association offers special thanks to Cheryl Fish, Dave and Gloria Peavy, Ed and Judy Adams, Mary Babin, Ozzie and Theda Neighbours, Randy and Kathy Van Noort, Rick and Carol Pate and Mike and Gwen Coleman. The Park experience would not be the same without these folks who love the park!

Visits to the Park begin at the entrance kiosk with the annual Visitor Guide that provides park history, a park map and information about interpretive and program activities. The Park Association, Friends of Burney Falls, funds the production of the newspaper.

26 canoe trips, funded by the Kelly’s Wishes Foundation and the Association, took nearly 300 visitors on tours of Lake Britton, with opportunities to see turtles, otters, eagles and other abundant bird species. Thanks to the Foundation, we were able to add two new canoes this year, and hope that we can expand the number of these very popular guided trips.

Bird walks are now a regular park activity, thanks to viewing telescopes and binoculars provided by The McConnell Foundation and Kelly’s Wishes Foundation. The local Wintu Audubon Society helped the Park update its bird list, and led a Society walk in the spring. They were just in time to see the arrival of the Black Swifts that nest in the falls, along with warblers, vireos, chickadees, woodpeckers, swallows and mergansers. The park was also hosting an active eagle nest and an osprey nest with two chicks during this late May walk. Organized bird walks served nearly 30 visitors; in addition, ten individuals checked out binoculars for their own exploration and additional visitors used the small bird and native plant library in the Visitor Center.

The Park offers a self-guided Discovery Challenge program, printed in the Visitor Guide. Over 1500 visitors completed the challenge and were awarded the 2018 Discovery Challenge embroidered patch of Burney Falls. In addition, the formal Junior Ranger program offers the opportunity to participate in activities and crafts.

Regular interpretive activities include hikes, crafts, singalongs, interpretingo games and Dutch oven cooking demonstrations. Campfire presentations are as much a part of camping here as marshmallows: 13 campfire evenings included four presentations by Shasta Wildlife Rescue & Rehabilitation, giving campers a chance to see and learn about live owls, hawks and eagles. This year, Camp Host Ed Adams created a new presentation, StarWatch, giving campers a tour of the heavens through telescopes. StarWatch was held on 5 nights in the summer, but despite its popularity, it was cancelled in August due to the smoke from nearby fires.

Interpretive staff provided ten presentations to school groups who visited the Park during the year. Nearly 500 youngsters walked the trails, explored the plant and animal life, and learned some of the history of the area.

Heritage Day

Nearly 1000 Park visitors enjoyed Heritage Day in October. This community event explores life in the 1870s in the Intermountain area. Local volunteers share their history and expertise with Mountain Man exhibits of tools and implements and opportunities to participate in candle-making, beading, weaving, pine-doll making, cross-cut sawing, branding wood discs, rope-making and target knife-throwing. Attendees made fresh apple juice with a hand-cranked press and helped prepare Dutch oven apple crisp. The day was enlivened with the music of Old Time Fiddlers and wagon rides with Wagon Ponies.

In addition to the individuals who share their skills, the Burney Lions Club, Leos Youth Organization and Rotary Club of Burney-Fall River provided parking assistance, food sales and the staffing of numerous activity booths. Many community folks have been helping put this heritage-themed day on for more than 30 years.

Castle Crags State Park

Castle Crags State Park suffered extensively from nearby wildfires this year, and was closed for many days due to smoke. In addition, park staff were called upon to assist in the fire suppression tasks, and Interstate 5 was closed for an extended period of time.

Despite this shortened time, the Association provided a Visitor Guide to 8000 park visitors. The Park provided 10 evening programs and awarded more than 250 Discovery Patches to campers and day visitors who completed the nature challenge. The remodeled gift store area provided visitors with opportunities to enrich their visit, and the funds from this activity, along with the sale of firewood and recycling, supported the educational and interpretive activities.

Social Media

More than 300,000 visits were logged in to www.BurneyFallsPark.org this year. The web site has continued to add content to support visitor experience in the Park.

Castle Crags State Park now has its own website, established this past year. The site logged 4,000 visits this year. Take a look at the activities and sights at http://www.CastleCragsPark.org

We also publish a periodic e-newsletter to keep our park friends up-to-date on the latest happenings at both Burney Falls and Castle Crags State Park. If you would like to receive the newsletter, please let us know at either web site above.

Financial Report

In spite of the months of fires and smoke that reduced park visitation, we had a very good year. Gross revenues of $89,364 included generous donations from the Delong-Sweet and the Kelly’s Wishes Foundations.

54% percent of 2018 revenue supported:

  • Interpretive Program expenses (36%)
  • Administrative costs (5%)
  • Restricted and rollover funds for 2019 (13%)

46% of 2018 revenue provided purchase of Visitor Center sales merchandise and the firewood production

Distribution of Net Revenues of $47,915

Firewood and Visitor Center Sales provided over half of the net revenue at 61% of funds earned, returning profits of 44% and 38% respectively. Recycling, advertisement sales, donations and foundation grants provided the other remainder revenue.

Distribution of Interpretive Program Expenditures -$31,747

  • Printing of the Visitor Guides for both parks – 20%
    Contribution to Park Interpretive Specialist position – 47%
  • Supplies for interpretive activities: hikes & canoe excursions, bird walks, campfire talks, discovery Quest Challenge & Junior Ranger and school presentations. – 15%
  • Volunteer Support for camp hosts and recycling programs – 3%
  • Heritage Day Festival including activity supplies for candle making, saw bucking and branding, Dutch oven cooking & apple pressing; wagon rides and Old Time Fiddlers. – 10%
  •  Canoe program repair and purchase of new canoes – 5%

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Rylee Stier honored as National PTA 2020-2021 Reflections Theme Search Contest winner

Rylee Stier with Principal Marcy Schmidt (Photo courtesy of Marcy Schmidt)

On January 30, Burney Elementary School first-grader Rylee Stier was honored at an afternoon assembly for being selected as the 2020-2021 Reflections Theme Search Contest winner by the National PTA Reflections Team.

Rylee’s submission, “I Matter Because…” was selected from nearly 100 student submissions across 21 states. The review was conducted by the National PTA Board Officer Team and Mission Engagement Committee.

As the Theme Search Contest winner, Rylee will receive $100 from National PTA and recognition in the 2019 Awards & Reflections Celebration program at the PTA annual convention.

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Now is the time to support the new library building in Burney

A meeting will soon be scheduled before the Shasta County Board of Supervisors to vote on release of funds for a new library building in Burney. If passed this will be good for all of the people in the Intermountain Area and a blessing for Shasta County.

It is very important at this time for people to contact all of the County Supervisors to express your support. Encourage them to review the plan being presented by Friend’s of the Intermountain Library (FOIL) and to vote for release of the Hatchet Ridge Wind Fund money that was set aside for this purpose. Now is the time to act!

People can contact all of he individual members of the Board. The members of the Board of Supervisors and their Email addresses are as follows:

Joe Chimenti, District 1 (Redding) jchimenti@co.shasta.ca.us
Leonard Moty, District 2 (Centerville, French Gulch, Happy Valley, Igo/Ono, Keswick, Platina, Shasta, South Redding, Verde Vale) lmoty@co.shasta.ca.us
Mary Rickert, District 3 (Bella Vista, Big Bend, Burney, Cassel, Fall River Mills, Hat Creek, McArthur, Montgomery Creek, Oak Run, Old Station, Palo Cedro, Pittville, Round Mountain, Whitmore) mrickert@co.shasta.ca.us
Steve Morgan, District 4 (Castella, Crag View, Lakehead, Shasta Lake, Mountain Gate) swmorgan@co.shasta.ca.us
Les Baugh, District 5 (Anderson, Cottonwood, Millville, Manton, Shingletown, Viola) lbaugh@co.shasta.ca.us

In addition to Emailing the individual Supervisors, you can also send an Email to the whole Board at shastacountybos@co.shasta.ca.us

Here is a flyer from FOIL.

Click to enlarge

For more information on the library action plan:
Kim Niemer explains FOIL action plan in meeting at Burney Lions Hall
FOIL appeals to the Board of Supervisors for release of library funds

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Filed under Burney, Burney Library, Friends of the Intermountain Library, Public Hearings

Kim Niemer explains FOIL action plan in meeting at Burney Lions Hall

On Tuesday evening January 22 at the Burney Lions Hall, the Friends of the Intermountain Library (FOIL) held a meeting to update the Burney community on the status of efforts to acquire a new building for the Intermountain branch of the Shasta County Library system in Burney.

Burney citizens attending a meeting on proposed new library building for the Burney branch of the Shasta County Public Library System

About 50 community members attended the event. FOIL president Pat Pell moderated the meeting. Ms. Pell thanked Lions Club President Mike Barnes for hosting the meeting on short notice and thanked the Burney Lions and the Rotary Club for their support for the project.

FOIL President Pat Pell opens the meeting

Pell then welcomed several people who have been helping prepare the FOIL plan. Kim Niemer, the evening’s main presenter, is the Redding Community Services Director. In that capacity, she helps to oversee the governance of the Shasta County Library System.

Francie Sullivan is currently a Shasta County Library Advisory Board representative. She lived in Burney and has served on the Shasta County Board of Supervisors and was on the Redding City Council from 2010 to 2018.

Peggy O’Lea is the retired director of the Shasta Library Foundation who helped to organize community support for the new Redding Library.

Anna M. Tracy is the Library Director for the Shasta Public Libraries who has been coming to Burney once a month to work with the Burney Library.

Ms. Pell also introduced the current officers and members of the FOIL Board and Kevin McKay, a general contractor from Cassel who has helped FOIL work through some of the practical aspects of improvements that are necessary for the proposed building.

Before Ms. Niemer’s presentation of FOIL’s action plan, Shasta County Supervisor Mary Rickert made brief comments. Rickert said that she came as an observer, explaining that she could not take a position on the proposed library building because she needs to remain open to all points of view until the public hearing has taken place at the Board of Supervisors and a vote is taken. She also said that she needs to be careful to abide by the Brown Act.

Supervisor Mary Rickert gives brief comment to the audience

After Supervisor Rickert’s remarks, Pell invited Ms. Niemer to speak. Ms. Niemer gave a 25 minute power point presentation in which she explained some of the history of the library and FOIL’s action plan for completion of the building project.

Ms. Niemer’s presentation began with a timeline of the history of the Burney Library in the context of the Shasta County Library system. The Burney Library became Shasta County’s first branch library in 1949. The current library building was built in 1969.

In 1989, all 14 of the Shasta County Library branches were closed due to a funding crisis. FOIL was formed to combat funding issues. In 1990, Shasta County along with the Cities of Redding and Anderson agreed to fund and reopen three libraries as part of the Shasta County Library system: Redding, Anderson, and Burney. FOIL has been making annual contributions as a part of the agreement. In 1999, FOIL’s contributions increased to over $11,000 per year.

In 2003, the State of California awarded a $12 million grant for the building of a new Redding library. FOIL continued to financially support the library system.

In 2004, another funding crisis led to shortened library hours. A Library Governance and Financing Task Force was formed to evaluate library services. FOIL continued their support during the hour shortage. In 2005, the task force recommended transferring governance to the City of Redding and in 2006, the Shasta County Board of Supervisors entered a 40 year contract with the City of Redding to manage County Library Services. That same year, the Redding City Council hired Library Systems and Services LLC to manage the library system. The arrangement has proved efficient and cost effective. The new Redding Library opened in 2007.

In 2008, Shasta County entered a community benefit agreement with the Hatchet Ridge Wind LLC. Hatchet Ridge Wind provided a grant of $1 million and an additional $100,000 per year for 20 years. The payments are to be used for the benefit of Burney and the surrounding area.

In 2009, FOIL made the expansion and relocation of the Burney Branch Library a priority. In 2012, Shasta County agreed to a preliminary feasibility study for a new library building. The study was completed in 2013. In 2014, the study was presented to the Board of Supervisors and the Board approved and set aside a $400,000 grant for a new library building contingent upon the formulation of a feasible plan and successful fundraising by FOIL.

After FOIL determined that the best location for a new building was the Roper building on Main Street, Shasta County did an assessment of the Roper building in 2016. In 2018, an official appraisal of the building was completed. The appraisal came in at $285,000.

There is a difference between the appraised value and the assessment of the building by the County. The County maintains that the value of the property is $300,000, which is the price that Mr. Roper is asking for the building. There are ongoing discussions on how to bridge the gap.

Ms. Niemar explained that the project is nearing the finish line. FOIL is hoping to bring their proposed plan before the Board of Supervisors in February for consideration as an action item. Their plan involves shared responsibility amongst Shasta County, The City of Redding, and FOIL.

FOIL is hoping that the plan will be accepted and that the County will approve release of the $400,000 Windmill funds for the purchase of the building and installation of a visual fire alarm system.

FOIL would need to complete their fundraising. According Ms. Pell, FOIL has $50,000 in cash and an additional $50,000 in pledges. Several foundations have indicated that they would also provide grants once a building is secured. They would be responsible for completing interior ADA improvements, parking lot improvements and moving the contents of the library to the new location.

The City of Redding would coordinate with the County on implementation of the action plan. Ms. Niemer proposed that he City of Redding would complete the parking lot improvements in coordination with FOIL and partner with FOIL on relocation and start-up.

Niemer presented a proposed budget detailing the costs to the County and FOIL respectively as follows:

Shasta County

Property and associated costs                                                        $299,250
Tenant Improvements                                                                     $   11,523
ADA and Safety                                                                                 $  45,000
Engineering/Inspection/Administration                                    $  23,650

Total                                                                                                   $379, 423

Friends of the Intermountain Library

Interior checklist (including ADA)                                              $ 30,000
Parking lot                                                                                        $ 40,000
Miscellaneous furnishings                                                            $  10,000
Contingency                                                                                     $  20,000

Total                                                                                                  $100,000

Ms. Neimer concluded her presentation by saying, “This is sort of our Hail Mary. If we don’t do this project at this time on this building, we know we lose the Rotary money because that money is going away quickly, there’s not really any other building on Main Street that is suitable, and I think that the patience and focus at Shasta County on this project goes away too. So now is the time if this is going to happen. I think we have before you a plan that is very viable and feasible. Now is the people part.”

She then invited Francie Sullivan and Peggy O’Lea to come forward to share. Both advised everyone to write or Email all of the members of the Board of Supervisors to encourage them to support the project.

There are five Supervisors on the Shasta County Board of Supervisors. In order for the project to be approved, three Board Members of the Board will need to vote in favor of the plan.

Ms. Sullivan also stressed the advantages that the County Library system provides and the difference between the County Library system and local lending libraries.

The discussion led to an extended period of question and answer during which Niemer, Sullivan, O’Lea, and Anna Tracy explained in more detail the plans and functions of the library.

A copy of the power point presentation on the action plan is available at the Burney Library.

People desiring more information about the plan, proposed library services, or how they can help, please contact Pat Pell, FOIL President, 335-7236 or ppell389@gmail.com.

People can contact all of he individual members of the Board. The members of the Board of Supervisors and their Email addresses are as follows:

Joe Chimenti, District 1 (Redding) jchimenti@co.shasta.ca.us
Leonard Moty, District 2 (Centerville, French Gulch, Happy Valley, Igo/Ono, Keswick, Platina, Shasta, South Redding, Verde Vale) lmoty@co.shasta.ca.us
Mary Rickert, District 3 (Bella Vista, Big Bend, Burney, Cassel, Fall River Mills, Hat Creek, McArthur, Montgomery Creek, Oak Run, Old Station, Palo Cedro, Pittville, Round Mountain, Whitmore) mrickert@co.shasta.ca.us
Steve Morgan, District 4 (Castella, Crag View, Lakehead, Shasta Lake, Mountain Gate) swmorgan@co.shasta.ca.us
Les Baugh, District 5 (Anderson, Cottonwood, Millville, Manton, Shingletown, Viola) lbaugh@co.shasta.ca.us

In addition to Emailing the individual Supervisors, you can also send an Email to the whole Board at shastacountybos@co.shasta.ca.us

See also:

FOIL appeals to the Board of Supervisors for release of library funds (Sept 2017)

Video playlist of January 22 meeting at Burney Lions Hall

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