Tag Archives: PG&E

PG&E to Increase Flows on Pit River Below Lake Britton and Pit 5 Dams for Powerhouse Maintenance and Whitewater Recreation

BURNEY, Calif.— Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) is urging the public to take extra safety precautions as water flows are increased on the Pit River below the Lake Britton Dam and Pit 5 Dam starting in September.

The higher flows are needed so PG&E can perform maintenance on the Pit 3 powerhouse tailrace, a concrete channel that carries water out the powerhouse and into the river.

While the Pit 3 Powerhouse is not operating September 1 through mid-December, no water will be diverted through the tunnel connecting the lake to the powerhouse, so water normally going through the tunnel will instead flow through or spill over the Lake Britton Dam.

Flows in the Pit 3 Reach will be about 750 cubic feet per second (cfs) from September 1 to 15, then increase to about 1,700 cfs. Flows in the Pit 3 reach typically range from 280 to 350 cfs in September. Flows may go higher during the wet season.

The Pit 3 Reach is the 4.5-mile portion of the Pit River in the Lassen National Forest between PG&E’s Lake Britton Dam and the Pit 3 Powerhouse.

PG&E is posting signage about the higher flows along the Pit River Road, and recreationists need to be aware of – and plan for – hazardous conditions.

Flows will also be higher in the Pit 5 Reach from September 5 through late November while PG&E performs planned maintenance on two generators at the Pit 5 Powerhouse.

The Pit 5 Reach is the 9.3-mile portion of the Pit River that extends from PG&E’s Pit 5 Dam to the J.B. Black Powerhouse near Big Bend. This portion of the river contains Class III, IV and V rapids, which are appropriate only for skilled paddlers. The reach is not appropriate for tubing.

Normal flows for September on the Pit 5 Reach range from 350 to 700 cfs but will range from 600 to 1,500 cfs during the powerhouse maintenance work from September 5 to late November.

PG&E will also conduct higher flows for whitewater recreation on September 8 and 9 on the Pit 5 Reach, with flows reaching at least 1,200 cfs over both days.

PG&E offers the following water safety tips:

  • Sudden immersion in cold water can stimulate the “gasp reflex,” causing an involuntary inhalation of air or water. It can even trigger cardiac arrest, temporary paralysis, hypothermia and drowning. When faced with swift water, even the strongest swimmers may be easily overwhelmed.
  • Many unseen obstacles can be lurking below the water’s surface. Swift water can make these obstacles even more treacherous. Guided trips for inexperienced paddlers are recommended.
  • Recreating in PG&E canals and flumes is strictly prohibited. Stay out of canals and flumes, which are very dangerous due to slippery sides, sub-surface obstacles, fast moving water, and transitions to full tunnels and pipes. For more water safety tips visit:  www.pge.com/hydrosafety
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Filed under Kayaking, PG&E, Pit River

A Big Step for Hat Creek Bioenergy

Press release from Symbioticrestoration.com Aug 9

The proposed Hat Creek Bioenergy facility signed a 20 year Power Purchase Agreement (PPA) with Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E). The facility proposes to use biomass from local forest health projects to create electricity (ca. 3 megawatts) using new technology. The facility is a partnership between local Hat Creek Construction, and West Biofuels, located in Woodland CA. Unlike solar power, utilization of biomass requires regular handling of material, which translates to more jobs and better socioeconomics. Utilization of biomass also helps improve forest management and air quality as the material is not burned in open piles, and thinning of dense forest structure reduces risk of higher intensity wildfires. The project is in part funded through grants received by the Fall River Resource Conservation District through a Wood Innovations Grant (U.S. Forest Service) and Electric Program Investment Charge (EPIC) from the California Energy Commission (CEC).

For more information visit: FallRiverRCD.org

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Filed under Intermountan Economic Development

PG&E Urges Safety During High Whitewater Flows on Pit 5 Reach

REDDING, Calif. — Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) will provide high whitewater flows on the Pit 5 Reach of the Pit River in eastern Shasta County over two weekends, the company announced today.

A kayaker navigates the Pit 5 Reach of the Pit River during high whitewater flows in 2014. Photo by Jeff Cook of Spring Rivers Ecological Sciences, LLC.

The higher flows will occur on August 11-12 and September 8-9. Those recreating in or near this portion of the river are encouraged to use extra caution during the increased flows. This portion of the river contains Class III, IV and V rapids, which are appropriate only for skilled paddlers. The reach is not appropriate for tubing.

The Pit 5 Reach is the 9.3-mile portion of the Pit River that extends from PG&E’s Pit 5 Dam and the J.B. Black Powerhouse near Big Bend.

Prior to the increase for August 11-12, flows in the Pit 5 Reach will be about 450 cubic feet per second (cfs).  On early Saturday morning PG&E will gradually increase water flows until it reaches 1,500 cfs, before 10 a.m. The flows will be held at this level until about 4 p.m. that day when flows will gradually be reduced to 600 cfs.

The higher flows will be repeated the next day at the same times, then, after 4 pm, gradually decreased to the normal flow of about 450 cfs.

On the weekend of September 8-9, PG&E will increase flows to 1,200 cfs on both days. As with the previous releases, if needed, starting early in the morning the flows will gradually be increased to the target level by 10 a.m. and then after 4 p.m. gradually decreased to more normal flow levels. But starting September 5, flows in the Pit 5 Reach will already be in the 1,000 to 1,500 cfs range in September due to a planned maintenance outage at the Pit 5 Powerhouse, and will remain above their seasonal normal until November when maintenance finishes.

The whitewater flows are a requirement of PG&E’s license conditions for the Pit 3, 4, and 5 Hydroelectric Project.

Due to the potential for wild fires in the region, higher flow dates are subject to change. PG&E recommends verifying the dates via the PG&E recreation website www.pge.com/recreation/.

PG&E offers the following water safety tips:

  • Sudden immersion in cold water can stimulate the “gasp reflex,” causing an involuntary inhalation of air or water. It can even trigger cardiac arrest, temporary paralysis, hypothermia and drowning. When faced with swift water, even the strongest swimmers may be easily overwhelmed.
  • Many unseen obstacles can be lurking below the water’s surface. Swift water can make these obstacles even more treacherous. Guided trips for inexperienced paddlers are recommended.
  • Recreating in PG&E canals and flumes is strictly prohibited. Stay out of canals and flumes, which are very dangerous due to slippery sides, sub-surface obstacles, fast moving water, and transitions to full tunnels and pipes.

About PG&E

Pacific Gas and Electric Company, a subsidiary of PG&E Corporation (NYSE:PCG), is one of the largest combined natural gas and electric energy companies in the United States. Based in San Francisco, with more than 20,000 employees, the company delivers some of the nation’s cleanest energy to nearly 16 million people in Northern and Central California. For more information, visit www.pge.com/ and www.pge.com/en/about/newsroom/index.page.

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Filed under Burney, Kayaking, PG&E, Pit River

BWD approves Solar Electric Installation Contract

On June 28, the Burney Water District approved a contract with Top Hat Energy, Inc. for the installation of a solar system at the Raymond H. Berry Pool to generate electricity. The Board also authorized BWD District Manager Willie Rodriguez to accept a 50,000 grant from the McConnell Foundation to help pay for the project.

Board President Fred Ryness, and Board Members Jim Hamlin and Britta Rogers were present at the meeting and voted unanimously to approve both agenda items.

The system will be installed by the pool where the horseshoe pits presently are. To install the system will cost $87,450. The grant from McConnell Foundation will cover $50,000. The remaining $37,450 will be paid from reserve funds. Reserve funds will be paid back as savings accrue.

The annual PG&E bill for pool operation, including both gas and electric, is currently about $10,000. Most of that cost is for electricity to run the pool pumps.  To insure that the water is clean and safe, the pumps at the pool run 24 hours a day 7 days a week from pool opening in May until closing ins September.

Electricity generated by the solar panels is returned to the grid and will be credited to BWD’s account. It is expected that the electricity generated will offset most of the electric cost resulting in thousands of dollars of savings per year. Thus, funds from the reserve should be reimbursed within four years.

The McConnell grant came with several conditions. One of the conditions is that the savings provide benefit to the community. One of the benefits is that the pool will be able to maintain and increase activities without increasing rates.

Labor costs are expected to rise in 2020 when the minimum wage is raised to $15 per hour. Increased labor costs could result in cutting hours of employees or limiting hours of operation of the pool. Savings on electricity will help to offset these rising labor expenses.

Pool manager Stephanie McQuade said that she hopes that rather than decreasing activities, the pool will now be able to add new programs.

The grant also stipulated that the project include some volunteerism. Before installation can occur, the horseshoe pits need to be removed and several trees need to be cleared. Several people have expressed interest in the pits. McQuade is looking for a tree faller who will volunteer services to take down the trees.

In addition, she is planning to have volunteers split, chop, and sell the wood as a fundraiser for the Swim Club.

Now, that the contract is approved, installation of the grid will begin as soon as the area is cleared. Top Hat Energy will be responsible for obtaining permits, installation, and providing interface with the PG&E grid.

Rodriguez said the new system could be operational as soon as August this summer. The life of the panels are 20 to 25 years and will be under warranty. Cameras will be installed to deter vandalism to the solar panels.

 

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Filed under Burney, Burney Water Board

Kid Fit Inaugural at Washburn-Bue Park

It was a beautiful day at Washburn Bue Park as scores of children, parents, and volunteers turned out for the inaugural event of KID FIT Summer 2018 on Tuesday evening June 12.

Kid Fit is a program that began in 2006 to address the obesity epidemic that was threatening the health of children in our country. The purpose of the program is to promote healthy lifestyle choices for children and families in the Intermountain area.

Kid Fit is organized locally by Shaylene Herndon from Bright Futures, Dana Haugue from Full Fitness Spectrum, and Tri Counties Community Network. Burney High School Senior Hailey Shaver is assisting Shaylene Herndon in the program for her Senior Project.

Organizers prep the kids

Pit River Casino donated $5000 to fund this years Kid Fit events. Additional funds were also provided by Mountain Cruisers and PG&E Employees Funds.

Tough Competition

Activities for the kids included Hula Hoop, tug-a-war, soccer, whiffle ball, jump rope, and lacrosse. Children from toddlers to teens participated.

Having a ball

This little tiger is running a race all his own

Tuesday evening’s kick-off festival at the park was the first of a series of\ events that will take place each week until July 12.

Upcoming events will be:

Tuesday June 19: Burney Falls night hike with free admission to the park.

Tuesday June 26: Family sports night at Bailey Park

Thursday July 5: Family track and field night at Burney High School Football field as one of the opening events for Burney Basin Days

Thursday July 12: Mud race and obstacle source on Bailey Avenue and family swim night at the Raymond Berry Community Pool.

All events begin at 6 p.m. For more information call Shaylene Herndon at 530-335-4600.

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Filed under Burney, Burney Basin Days, Burney Falls, Pit River Casino, Tri-Counties Community Center, youth

PG&E Flying Low in Shasta, Tehama, Lassen, Trinity to Inspect for Dead Trees

REDDING, Calif.—As part of its ongoing response to California’s tree mortality crisis, Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) will conduct aerial patrols in Shasta, Tehama, Lassen and Trinity counties on June 12 and 13 to identify dead trees that could pose a wildfire or other public safety risk.

Five years of drought and bark beetle infestation in California have caused millions of trees to die or become structurally compromised. We’ve made significant progress to help reduce wildfire risk by removing dead and dying trees and we’re not slowing down. We will continue this critical safety work in 2018, Carl Schoenhofer, PG&E’s senior manager of PG&E’s North Valley Division.

Every year, PG&E inspects and monitors every overhead electric transmission and distribution line, either on foot or by air, with some locations patrolled multiple times. Since the tree mortality crisis began, the energy company has increased foot and aerial patrols in high fire-risk areas to twice a year and up to four times a year in some locations. In 2018, PG&E expects to patrol over half of its overhead distribution lines at least two times.

PG&E is using a contract helicopter service to fly foresters over the area to inspect trees. Patrolling by air allows the company to cover many miles quickly and efficiently, and reduces impacts on the ground. Residents are advised that the helicopter will fly low – at about 200 to 300 feet above the ground – along distribution power lines, and higher in areas where livestock are present.

On June 12, flights will occur over the Shasta County communities of Fall River Mills, McArthur, Cassel, Hat Creek and Old Station. Flights will also occur over the Lassen County communities of Nubieber and Bieber.

On June 13, flights will occur over the Tehama County communities of Manton, Paynes Creek, Dales, Mineral, Mill Creek, Lyonsville and Platina, as well as Shingletown in Shasta County and Wildwood in Trinity County.

Depending on clear weather conditions, flights will occur between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.

About PG&E

Pacific Gas and Electric Company, a subsidiary of PG&E Corporation (NYSE:PCG), is one of the largest combined natural gas and electric energy companies in the United States. Based in San Francisco, with more than 20,000 employees, the company delivers some of the nation’s cleanest energy to nearly 16 million people in Northern and Central California. For more information, visit www.pge.com/ and www.pge.com/en/about/newsroom/index.page.

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Higher Flows Below Pit 5 Dam Through June 6

Water flows are higher than seasonally normal along the Pit River below the Pit 5 Dam, and are expected to remain that way through about June 6, Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) announced today.

Nothing is more important to PG&E than the safety of the public and its employees. That’s why PG&E is urging those recreating in or near the river are encouraged to use extra caution during the increased flows. Water flows are ranging from 1,500 to 2,000 cubic feet per second (cfs) along the Pit 5 Reach, which is the 9.3-mile stretch of the Pit River between the Pit 5 Dam and the Pit 5 powerhouse near Big Bend. These flows are like those found during whitewater recreational flows in August.

With two of four generators at the powerhouse currently not producing power, less water is being diverted by tunnel from the Pit 5 Reservoir to the powerhouse, so more water is flowing past the dam. Recent high-country rains have also increased flows.

Normal flows for June range from 350 to 550 cfs.      

PG&E expects to have all four generators operating in early June, at which point flows on the Pit 5 Reach should return to normal seasonal flows.  

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Filed under PG&E, Pit River