Tag Archives: Pit River Tribe

Burney Chamber Fall Fling

160 people turned out for the Burney Chamber of Commerce Fall Fling at the Veterans Hall on Saturday evening, October 28.

Burney Chamber President and Office Manager Willie Rodriguez and Jen Luck emceed the event.

Burney Chamber President Willie Rodriguez

Chamber Office Manager Jen Luck

Honorary Mayor of Burney Jill Daugherty announced this year’s award winners.

Honorary Mayor of Burney Jill Daugherty

Tubit Enterprises was named Business of the Year.

Doug & Jennifer Lindgren of Tubit Enterprises receive the award for Business of the Year

Anesha Pearson was named Employee of the Year.

Anesha Pearson from Gepetto’s named Employee of the Year

Boy Scout Troop 38 was named Organization of the Year

Organization Of The Year is Boy Scout Troop 38

George Chapman was named Volunteer of the year.

George Chapman is Volunteer of the Year

The theme of this year’s Fall Fling was Outdoor Adventure. Folks dressed for the occasion.

A delicious meal was prepared by Lassen RV Bistro.

Jen introducing chefs from Lassen RV Park

Many civic minded people showed up to enjoy the evening and support the event.

Pit River Casino Supporters

The Leadership Club of Burney High School served the meal.

After the meal, raffle winners were announced and items were auctioned. It was a jolly good time and a worthwhile event. Congratulations to the Burney Chamber of Commerce for a successful year.

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Burney, Chamber of Commerce, Pit River Country Events

Pit River Casino Egg Hunt delights

Hundreds of children took delight in gathering plastic eggs filled with candy on the grounds of Pit River Casino on a beautiful Saturday afternoon April 15. Beginning at noon, there were 4 separate hunts for age groups 0-3, 4-6, 7-9, and 10 and older.

Young lad in a field of eggs

 

Parents with toddlers on a hunt for eggs

 

Harvesting a cache of eggs

 

Ten year old and up are off and running

 

A stampede of 7 to 9 year olds

In addition to the egg hunts, there was also a delicious barbecue of hamburgers and hot dogs and drawings for cool prizes.

Signing up for the drawing

 

Cool prizes

Pit River Casino Manager Mike Avelar said, “We do this to give back to the community by getting everybody together and letting the kids have fun.”

Mike Avelar preparing kids for the egg hunt

Among the many families who enjoyed the event were the Meltons. Jakob Melton, age 6, collected 17 eggs.  He said the Easter Bunny came and left the eggs and then “just hopped off.”

The Melton family

Melisha Carpenter said she would like to have more eggs but she was very grateful to the Easter Bunny for the ones that she did find.

Melisha Laree Carpenter

Many thanks to Pit River Casino for a wonderful community event.

Leave a comment

Filed under Burney, Pit River Country Events, Pit River Tribe, youth

Pit River Tribe to host reader’s theatre and pot luck January 13

Click on flyer to enlarge

Click on flyer to enlarge

On January Friday 13, 2017, there will be a reading of a play entitled “Undamming History.” The event will held from 6-8 p.m. at the Pit River Tribal Community Room in the Pit River Health Services Building located on Park Ave. Burney, CA.

There will also be a pot luck dinner.

The community is invited to “Bring a dish and join an informal script read of the play about local tribal history that debuted Oct. 22 at the Cascade Theater. Have fun while learning about indigenous history!”

The Shasta Historical Society and four tribes in the area collaborated to create the work.

Marc Dadigan, Jack Potter, Louise Davis, Jessica Jim and others who were part of the committee that produced the play will be in attendance. Some of the actors who played roles at the debut in Redding are also planning to come. In addition, Patricia Lord from the Shasta Historical Society will be present and perhaps speak about the resources the society can provide.

If you would like more information on the program, please email marcdadigan@gmail.com. A copy of the script is available on the Shasta Historical Society’s website.

Leave a comment

Filed under Burney, Pit River Area History, Pit River Tribe

Whitewater Recreation on the Pit One Reach

About 60 whitewater adventurers came to Pit River Country the weekend of October 29-30 for whitewater recreation on the Pit One Reach. Kayakers and rafters came from as far away as Alaska and Wyoming. Ages of participants ranged from 14 years old to 68.

Headed down the Pit photo by Christine O'Conner

Headed down the Pit photo by Christine O’Connor

Every year, whitewater flows are required as part of PG&E’s license conditions for the Pit 1 Hydroelectric Project. The Pit 1 Reach is the 6.5-mile portion of the Pit River that extends from PG&E’s Pit 1 Forebay in Fall River Mills to the Pit 1 Powerhouse.

Group by the rock photo by Christine O'Conner

Group by the rock photo by Christine O’Connor

On October 24, PG&E increased flows from about 200 cubic feet per second (cfs) to 800 to 900 cfs creating Class IV and V rapids . This provides a particularly exciting opportunity for kayakers and rafters because the section of the river includes Pit River Falls.

Heading over the falls photo by Christine O'Conner

Heading over the falls photo by Christine O’Connor

Some kayakers go over the falls. Some choose to ride the chute parallel to the falls. In either case it is an exciting ride. The stretch ends at the Bureau of Land Management Campground at Pit 1.

Over the falls photo by Christine O'Conner

Over the falls photo by Christine O’Connor

 

Where's the kayak photo by Christine O'Conner

Where’s the kayak photo by Christine O’Connor

This was the second whitewater recreation weekend of the year on Pit 1 reach. The first event had been October 8-9. The scheduling of the event is a cooperative effort of PG&E, BLM and American Whitewater.

Most of the participants come on Saturday and camp overnight at the BLM  campground to  continue their weekend of fun. On Saturday night many of the campers enjoyed a combination Halloween Octoberfest celebration.

Halloween October Fest celebration photo by Christine O'Conner

Halloween October Fest celebration photo by Christine O’Connor

I wasn’t able to make the first event. Nor was I able to get there on Saturday the 29. Sunday was my last chance.

When my wife Linda and I got out of church it was pouring rain. We drove to the campground to interview some of the kayakers. The first group I met consisted of  Karen Guibault from Chico, Jami Rains from Sacramento, Sara Strader and Mary Elliot from Verdi, Nevada, Bruce Taylor from Reno, and Stephanie Viselli from Carson City and Christine O’Connor who had taken many wonderful pictures of the group’s escapades.

Kayakers from Nevada and Northern California

Kayakers from Nevada and Northern California

Undaunted by the rain, they had finished their ride for the day and were enjoying a feast of leftovers from the celebration that they had had the night before. They kindly gave me a bag full of sauerkraut.

When I asked them all if they had a quote, they said, “Thanks to PG&E, BLM, and AW!”

After a joyful chat, I headed down to the swimming hole where I met another group: Patrick Baird and Bird Sewett from White Salmon Washington, Brad Gossett from Alaska, and Riley Gardner from Jackson Hole Wyoming.

Kayakers from Alaska, Wyoming, Oregon, and Washington

Kayakers from Alaska, Wyoming, Oregon, and Washington

Then I saw two more trudging up from the river carrying their kayaks.

Joyful rafters after a great ride

Joyful rafters after a great ride

And last but not least 14 year old Nathan with his kayak on his back.

14 year-old Nathan carrying his kayak back from the Pit

14 year-old Nathan carrying his kayak back from the Pit

They were done for the day. I was getting soaked and Linda was waiting in the car. There were a few rafters still on the river but they weren’t expected to arrive soon. Linda and I headed home grateful that we had been able to meet these wonderful whitewater enthusiasts  of all ages and share just a taste of their excitement.

Many thanks to Christine O’Connor for the wonderful action photos.

Leave a comment

Filed under Kayaking, PG&E, Pit River

PG&E to increase flows above Pit One Oct 24-Nov 20

Whitewater recreation scheduled October 29 to 30

Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) will provide higher flows on a portion of the Pit River in eastern Shasta County.

The higher flows will occur from October 24 to November 20. The higher flows are the result of both powerhouse maintenance at the Pit 1 Powerhouse and for whitewater recreation scheduled October 29 to 30. Flows will be increased from about 200 cubic feet per second (cfs) to 800 to 900 cfs over the entire four-week period.

Recreationalists in or near this portion of the river are encouraged to use extra caution during the increased flows. This portion of the river contains Class IV and V rapids, which are appropriate only for skilled paddlers. The flows are not safe for tubing.

The Pit 1 Reach is the 6.5-mile portion of the Pit River that extends from PG&E’s Pit 1 Forebay in Fall River Mills to the Pit 1 Powerhouse.

While the powerhouse is undergoing scheduled maintenance, water will not be diverted into a tunnel and instead will flow into the Pit 1 Reach.

PG&E previously conducted higher flows on the Pit 1 Reach on October 8 and 9.

The whitewater flows are a requirement of PG&E’s license conditions for the Pit 1 Hydroelectric Project.

Despite the drought, water flows in the Pit River watershed are near normal as the Pit River is largely fed by springs that steadily release water from large volcanic aquifers, even in dry years.

At PG&E, safety is our top priority. PG&E offers the following water safety tips:

  • Sudden immersion in cold water can stimulate the “gasp reflex,” causing an involuntary inhalation of air or water. It can even trigger cardiac arrest, temporary paralysis, hypothermia and drowning. When faced with swift water, even the strongest swimmers may be easily overwhelmed.
  • Many unseen obstacles can be lurking below the water’s surface. Swift water can make these obstacles even more treacherous. Guided trips for inexperienced paddlers are recommended.
  • Recreating in PG&E canals and flumes is strictly prohibited. Stay out of canals and flumes, which are very dangerous due to slippery sides and fast moving water.See
For more on the recreation event see Whitewater Recreation on the Pit One Reach

Leave a comment

Filed under PG&E, Pit River

Happy Native American Day!

In 1998, the California Assembly passed AB 1953 making Native American Day an official state holiday, observed annually on the fourth Friday in September.

California has more than 100 recognized Native American tribes, representing a diverse cultural heritage extending back over thousands of years. Pit River Country is the home of the Achomawi people.

To celebrate this year’s California Native American Day, the Pit River Casino and Kwahn Corporation hosted a special Customer Appreciation Day.

The casino provided a delicious tri-tip barbecue.

Tri-tips barbecue, Music, and raffles

Tri-tips barbecue, Music, and raffles

The Pit River Nation Drum group were there singing and drumming sacred songs and music.

Pit River Drummers

Pit River Drummers

As the drummers drummed and sang, Lawrence Thomas danced in traditional regalia.

Pit River Drummers and Lawrence and Native American dancer Thomas

Pit River Drummers and Lawrence and Native American dancer Thomas

People who attended were given a beautiful Native American Day T-shirt. If they made a $5 purchase at the mini-mart they got a ticket for a $500 raffle at 3 p.m. Other prizes were drawn throughout the afternoon.

Pepsi, Sysco, Frito Lays, K&K Distributing Co., John and Sandy McCullar, the Mountain Cruisors, Burney Chamber of Commerce, Hovis Hardware, Precision Lube, Valley Hardware, and Mountain Auto Parts sponsored the event.

Evelyn Maldonada, one of the organizers said that the event was something to “bring the community together.”

Mike Avelar, Pit River Casino Manager said that they like to do things to support the community “because without the community, we would not be here.”

 

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Burney, Pit River Tribe

Tribal Youth Program teaches knowledge and skill

Photos courtesy of Lomakatsi Restoration Project

This July, ten young members of the Pit River Tribe ranging in age from 14-18 participated in a month long work and training program. The project combined science and cultural education with work to restore the ecology of the wild trout area of lower Hat Creek.

Tribal Youth, Elders, and Program Partners on opening day of the Pit River Tribal Ecosystem Workforce Training Program

Tribal Youth, Elders, and Program Partners on opening day of the Pit River Tribal Ecosystem Workforce Training Program

The Pit River Tribe, Lomakatsi Restoration Project, and Cal Trout cooperated to make the project a success. Cal Trout provided a grant to pay for the program. Pit River Tribe elders, cultural representatives and environmental technicians instructed the youth in Traditional Ecological Knowledge. Lomakatsi managed the program and employed the youth, providing technical expertise and professional mentors in ecological restoration.

The project included a full schedule of educational and hands-on activities.

The young people spent a week at a science camp at the College of the Siskiyous in Weed learning about the waterways, flora, and the fauna of the area.

The work project on Hat Creek involved trail improvement, restabilizing the banks, and helping to restore the natural oak environment along the creek. Belinda Brown, Tribal Partnership Coordinator for Lomakatsi Restoration Project, organized the work crews, picking up the young workers in the morning at the Safeway store and supervised their activities thoughout the day.

Trail improvement along Hat Creek

Trail improvement along Hat Creek

The group also visited Ajumawi Springs to study and repair fish traps.

Ginger Mike, Cultural Representative of the Ajumawi Band, shared about the importance of cultural resource protection and sacred sites.

Ginger Mike shares about the importance of cultural resource protection and sacred sites

Ginger Mike teaching about cultural resource protection and sacred sites

Participants learned about traditional foods such as pine nuts. The Hat Creek Ranger Station also addressed the group. In addition, the young people received some instruction in Achomawi language.

As a complement to learning traditional Pit River environmental technology, the young people were also treated to a day of fly fishing. Michelle Titus hosted the group at Clearwater Lodge and Drew Braugh from Cal Trout and three guides taught the young people fly fishing techniques.

Toward the end of the program the group was joined by tribal youth from the Ashland area in Southern Oregon. Radley Davis, Cultural Practitioner of the Illmawi Band, led a workshop teaching the young people to make a dugout canoe from a giant cedar tree trucked over from Old Station.

Dug out canoe workshop

Dug out canoe workshop

The program concluded with a visit by the combined youth programs to Burney Falls a traditional sacred site of the Illmawi Band of the Pit River Tribe.

Tribal Youth Project at Burney Falls

Tribal Youth and Ashland Youth Programs at Burney Falls

The Pit River Tribe is a sovereign federally recognized Native American Tribe consisting of 11 autonomous bands, whose homes and properties are distributed throughout the Upper Pit River watershed in northern California for time immemorial. The tribe contributed immensely to the success of the project.

“Protection and preservation of the cultural and environmental resources helps the tribe maintain sovereign jurisdiction over the tribe’s ancestral lands,” Chairman Gemmill said. “The partnerships have been able to provide economic and educational opportunities for the people.”

Lomakatsi in the Hopi language means “life in balance.” The Lomakatsi Restoration Project is a non‐profit, grassroots organization that develops and implements forest and watershed restoration programs and projects in Oregon and Northern California. Since 1995, Lomakatsi has formed collaborative partnerships with a broad range of partners including federal and state land management agencies, Native American Tribes, The Nature Conservancy, land trusts, private landowners, watershed councils, and city and county governments.

“Inspiring young people to pursue careers focused on the stewardship of forests, waterways and wildlife habitat is an important part of our mission,” Lomakatsi Executive Director Marko Bey said. “Traditional Ecological Knowledge is vital to successful ecosystem restoration.”

Leave a comment

Filed under Ajumawi State Park, Burney, Burney Falls, Hat Creek, Lake Britton, Pit River Tribe