Tag Archives: Shasta County

Albert Scheckla and Sage Harner honored as October Students of the Month

Albert Scheckla and Sage Harner were honored as October Students of the Month at the Burney Lions Club on Thursday evening October 14. Scheckla was named 12th grade student of the month and Harner was named 8th grade student of the month.

BHS Principal Ray Guerrero, Sage Harner, Albert Scheckla, and Lion George Whitfield

The students were introduced by Burney High School Principal Ray Guerrero.

Senior Albert Scheckla has a grade point of 4.29, the highest grade point a student can earn taking AP classes. He is DSB President and Boys State Delegate. He is active in Leos Club, Interact Club, FNL, and S Club and plays on the baseball and basketball teams.

Albert enjoys snorkeling, hiking and traveling. In his spare time he likes to work, do volunteer work, watch television, and sleep. In the future he hopes to visit Palau Micronesia because his dad has been there and talked about it and he wants to see what it is like for himself.

After graduating, Albert plans to go to Shasta College and then transfer to Cal Poly, Chico State, or Sacramento State to get a degree in Mechanical Engineering.

Albert’s father and mother, Brian and Barbara Scheckla were both at the dinner. His dad said, “He does so much at school that we hardly ever get to see him. It would be nice to see him do some traveling because everyone who travels comes back with a different point of view.”

Albert’s father has been to over 60 countries.

Eighth grader Sage Harner has a 4.0 grade point average. She likes science and reading and plays on the girls volleyball team. She enjoys drawing, reading, and writing.

After finishing high school, she wants to go to college and become an author or an anesthesiologist. She hopes that one day she will publish a book.

Sage’s father and mother, Marti and Lori Harner, were present to watch their daughter honored. Mr. Harner said, “It is important that young people recognize what society expect of them and also to receive the rewards.”

Lion George Whitfield presented Albert with a check for $100 and Sage with a check for $50 on behalf of the Burney Lions Club.

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Intermountain Teens host healing drum circle at Hill Valley Clinic

More than 40 people gathered at the Hill Country Clinic on Wednesday evening November 14 to participate in a healing drum circle sponsored by the Intermountain Teen Center.

Intermountain Teen Center Healing Drum Circle

The teens invited everyone in community and drew drummers and shakers ranging in age from a young toddler to senior citizens.

This young fellow tried many different instruments

Circle of Friends in Burney brought a bus load and two vans and people came from Round Mountain, Montgomery Creek, and Big Bend. There were lots of drums, shakers, clacking sticks and other rhythm instruments so that everyone was able to participate.

Teen Center Program Coordinator Theresa Callahan welcomed everybody and then introduced experienced drummer Verena Compton, who facilitated the drum circle together with her husband Randy.

Verena began with a prayer in both German and English. She advised people that the African djembes were meant to be played with hands only. Then she began a beat and everyone joined in. After a period of time the drumming came to an end and then Verena or Randy began a new beat for another period. And so it was for one hour as people joined in with djembes, bongos, Native American drums, gourds, shakers, and sticks. The drum circle continued for about one hour.

Twin drummers Britney and Sara

Communal drum circles have existed amongst indigenous people around the world for thousands of years. They began becoming popular in the United States during the counterculture movement in the  late 1960’s. Over the years, it has been found that drumming is therapeutic.

In 1991, during testimony before the United States Senate Special Committee on Aging, Grateful Dead drummer Mickey Hart stated:

Typically, people gather to drum in drum “circles” with others from the surrounding community. The drum circle offers equality because there is no head or tail. It includes people of all ages. The main objective is to share rhythm and get in tune with each other and themselves. To form a group consciousness. To entrain and resonate. By entrainment, I mean that a new voice, a collective voice, emerges from the group as they drum together.

In his book “The Healing Power of the Drum”, Robert Lawrence Friedman states:

Some of the psychological applications in which hand drums are being used include assisting veterans to release the emotional pain of post-traumatic stress disorder, releasing the pent-up anger and negative emotions of “at-risk” adolescents, and promoting health in corporate executives through releasing their day-to-day stress, in addition to many other applications.

The Intermountain Teen Center plans to host more drum circles for the community in the future.

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Deputy District Attorney speaks at Mt. View High School

Shasta County Deputy District Attorney Josh Brown and Investigator Joe Scarry came to Mountain View High School in Burney on Wednesday morning November 14 to give a slide presentation on numerous issues such as cyber security, identity theft, sexting, cyber bullying, child pornography, stealing, and sex with  minors. About two dozen students and teachers from Mt. View and Soldier Mountain High Schools and Burney and Fall River Community Day Schools were present for the presentation.

Deputy DA Brown engages in discussion with students

When asked “What does the District Attorney do?” Deputy Brown explained that he prosecutes crimes, determines what crimes have been committed, and sends cases to court.

As he showed the slides, Deputy Brown asked questions and engaged the students in discussion. Brown explained various laws and their application and students openly and honestly expressed their experiences and opinions.

The group discussed a person’s “Digital Footprint.” Anyone who uses the internet, posts on social media, makes online purchases, or opens an account creates an online record. This digital footprint can be used by cyber predators  with a negative agenda.

Investigator Scarry stated, “Once you post something, you lose control. The risk of identification theft grows higher, the more online accounts one has.”

Talking about privacy, Brown emphasized that even if a person’s Facebook or Instagram account is marked private, once a person’s friends have access to information they can make it public.

Negative aspects of sexting (sharing sexually explicit messages) can have negative and embarrassing consequences well into the future affecting peoples employment and other relationships. Examples include not being able to own a gun, fewer job opportunities, and if you are an adult, you will have to register as a sex offender, if convicted. Sexting with a minor is considered child pornography.

Minors who sext between other minors is a growing problem, because not only does this put adolescents at risk for social ridicule and cyber-bullying, but it opens up ways for sexual predators to victimize young people.

Possession of child pornography is a felony. Brown advised people that if they received unsolicited child pornography they should report it to local law enforcement.

Child pornography statute

Sexual relations between an adult and a minor was also addressed. It is a crime. The adult is responsible even if the minor misrepresents their age. The law is designed to protect minors and hold adults accountable for knowing the age of their partners.

Deputy AG Brown and Inspector Scarry talk with students

In a lively exchange on theft, Brown emphasized that stealing another person’s property is never all right. Several students made the point that if people were careless or irresponsible with their property they were also partly “at fault.” Brown responded that the carelessness of a victim does not excuse theft. For example, it is not all right or legal to take something from a car if they left the door unlocked or to take something that somebody accidentally left behind when they left a room.

Investigator Scarry told the students that his job was to thoroughly investigate each incident to determine the truth. If a crime was committed, investigation might determine that charges were warranted or exculpatory evidence might emerge which would tend to clear  an accused person of a charge of fault or guilt.

Brown explained that prosecutors need to decide what cases to prosecute. Generally, a prosecutor will not charge a person unless they feel that they have a strong enough case to convince a jury that the person is guilty.

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“Christmas in November” benefits Happy Valley Women & Children’s Center

Mother and child testimony

Approximately 45 people attended a “Christmas in November” program at the Word of Life Assembly of God Church (WOLA)in Burney on Saturday, November 10 to support Happy Valley Women & Children’s Center in Anderson.

Happy Valley Women & Children’s Center is a part of Sacramento Valley Teen Challenge, a branch of Adult & Teen Challenge, a worldwide network of Christian faith-based corporations intended to help teenagers, adults, and families with problems such as substance abuse or self-destructive behavior.

Christmas in November

Eight churches from the Assemblies of God Mt. Shasta Section of the Northern California Nevada District participated in Saturday’s gathering at WOLA . $50 gift certificates were given for 23 women and gifts were given to 6 children. Each child received a present purchased specially for them.

The event included fellowship, testimonies from women participating in the Happy Valley program, and lunch. Anna’s Country Kitchen donated beef enchiladas to provide a delicious main course.

WOLA Church Secretary Kathy Newton said, “It was such a joyful experience to see the delight on the kids faces and to share a meal and get to know some of the women from Teen Challenge whose lives are really being changed!”

Teen Challenge traces its roots to the work of David Wilkerson with New York City teens in the late 1950’s. Wilkerson founded Teen Challenge in 1960. In 1962, he published his influential book, The Cross and the Switchblade.

Over the years the program expanded nationally and then internationally. It also expanded its work to include families and adults. In 2017, the organization officially changed its name to Adult & Teen Challenge to acknowledge that the organization works with both teenagers and adults in its addiction treatment centers.

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Never Be Confused about How to Recycle in Shasta County Again!

From Shasta County Resource Management Department:

Shasta County’s Department of Resource Management has made it much easier for residents to stay informed about how to reduce waste and recycle in our community. County staff knows that remembering what’s recyclable or what to do with unwanted items such as electronics, mattresses, and paint can be difficult. That’s why they added a “waste wizard”, also called the “How Do I Get Rid Of?” tool, to their website!

The waste wizard can be found at recycle.co.shasta.ca.us. To use it, simply choose which part of the county you live in and then type in the name of the material you would like to get rid of. The waste wizard will tell you where to take the material for recycling, composting, or proper disposal. The waste wizard also provides tips on reusing and repairing certain items, as well as ideas for preventing waste from being generated in the first place.

“The residents of our county are motivated to conserve resources and protect our natural environment by recycling, composting, and diverting waste away from landfills,” said Paul Hellman, Director of Resource Management. “We are pleased to make it easier for them to do so with the introduction of a new online tool.”

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County officials encourage attention to air quality due to wildfire smoke

From  Shasta County Air Quality Management District:SHASTA COUNTY

It’s important residents take the appropriate measures to protect their health and lungs as wildfire smoke from the Camp Fire is entering Shasta County due to decreased northerly winds.

Officials from the Shasta County Air Quality Management District (AQMD) and Health and Human Services Agency encourage the public to check air quality levels when making daily plans. Conditions can change quickly and can also vary in different areas of the county based on elevation, topography and wind direction. These changing conditions will continue until the fires are under control, making the habit of checking air quality a practice that should be done frequently.

Based on current weather patterns, particulate matter levels within low lying areas on the eastern side of the Sacramento Valley and Anderson have reached UNHEALTHY for SENSITIVE GROUPS (AQI 101-150 range). Smoke is expected to be worse in the early morning hours, then improve in the afternoon as northerly winds materialize. This pattern is expected to remain in place for several days.

For other areas in Shasta County, particulate matter readings are predicted to be anywhere on the Air Quality Index from GOOD (AQI 0-50), MODERATE (AQI 51-100 range), UNHEALTHY for SENSITIVE GROUPS (AQI 101-150 range), and UNHEALTHY (AQI 151 to 200 range). All members of the public, especially those with respiratory or heart disease, the elderly, pregnant women, and children should remain alert. If necessary, reduce or avoid all outdoor exertion when wildfire smoke is present. When levels are not favorable, everyone else should limit prolonged exertion in areas of noticeable smoke accumulation. Individuals wishing to minimize their exposure should:
1) Limit exercise and outdoor activities.
2) Remain indoors with the windows and doors closed.
3)Turn on an air conditioner with a recirculation setting. (such as in a vehicle)

The AQI readings from the fixed monitor are updated hourly and are available at the following website: www.co.shasta.ca.us/index/drm_index/aq_index/aq_map.aspxAdditionally, the air district has deployed experimental particulate matter (smoke) sensors throughout Shasta County. These sensors are not official monitors but can be used to help gauge smoke levels in particular locations. When accessing this data, it is advisable to switch the Map Data Layer dialogue box in the lower left hand corner from “None” to “AQ and U”. This will apply a correction factor that will make the readings relate more closely to the official air quality data. They can be accessed at: For additional information and updates, you may visit the Air Quality Management District Wildfire Smoke Webpage at: https://www.co.shasta.ca.us/index/drm_index/aq_index/aq_wildfire.aspx or call 225-5674.

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Rotary Club of Burney-Fall River hosts foreign exchange student victimized by Camp Fire

NEWS RELEASE from Bob Jehn, November 10, 2018:

Imagine yourself in a foreign country trying to communicate in a new language when suddenly a massive wildfire sweeps through the town where you are living, destroying your house and everything you brought with you except your passport, your cell phone, and the clothes you are wearing. That’s exactly what happened to Valeria Romo Mejia, a fifteen-year-old Rotary Youth Exchange Student from Columbia, as she was preparing to leave for classes at Paradise High School on November 8th.

Photo taken by Valeria as she was fleeing the Camp Fire

Victims of the most destructive fire in California history, Valeria and her host family endured the four-hour drive to Chico with more than 20,000 others who were trying to escape the flames, not knowing what would be next.

Fire Chief Monte Keady

Thanks to the Rotary support network and a quick decision by Rotary Club President-Elect and Burney Fire Chief Monte Keady, Valeria is safely in Burney in her own room at Monte and Robin Keady’s home. The Keadys were already hosting Austrian Exchange Student Katharina Schatz, who had made friends with Valeria at the Interact Kickoff Event in Winters, California last month.

Columbian exchange Student Valeria Romo Mejia

Rotary Youth Exchange Officer Bob Jehn along with Rotary District personnel is coordinating the effort to provide immediate financial assistance to Valeria, so she can purchase new clothes, school supplies, and other personal items lost in the fire.

Jehn says, “We hope Valeria decides to stay in Burney for the rest of her exchange year, but we’re taking it one day at a time. I’m just so proud to be part of an organization with members like Monte and Robin, who are always thinking of how they can help others.”

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